Melissa Alcorn

Melissa Alcorn
University of California, Santa Barbara | UCSB · Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

9.61
 · 
B.S. in Chemistry
About
5
Research items
132
Reads
5
Citations
Introduction
Melissa Alcorn currently works at the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara. Melissa does research in Molecular Biology, Genetics and Developmental Biology. Their most recent publication is 'Heterotaxy in Caenorhabditis : widespread natural variation in left–right arrangement of the major organs.' Current on-going work includes identifying genetic variants and underlying molecular mechanism(s) of stochastic programmed cell death.
Network
Cited By
Followers
Following
Research
Research items (5)
Article
Full-text available
Innovations in metazoan development arise from evolutionary modification of gene regulatory networks (GRNs). We report widespread cryptic variation in the requirement for two key regulatory inputs, SKN-1/Nrf2 and MOM-2/Wnt, into the C. elegans endoderm GRN. While some natural isolates show a nearly absolute requirement for these two regulators, in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Innovations in metazoan development arise from evolutionary modifications of gene regulatory networks (GRNs). We report large cryptic variation in the requirement for two key inputs, SKN-1/Nrf2 and MOM-2/Wnt, into the C. elegans endoderm-determining GRN. Some natural variants show a nearly absolute requirement for SKN-1 and MOM-2, while in others,...
Article
Full-text available
Although the arrangement of internal organs in most metazoans is profoundly left–right (L/R) asymmetric with a predominant handedness, rare individuals show full (mirror-symmetric) or partial (heterotaxy) reversals. While the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is known for its highly determinate development, including stereotyped L/R organ handedness,...
Article
Although the arrangement of internal organs in most metazoans is profoundly left–right (L/R) asymmetric with a predominant handedness, rare individuals show full (mirror-symmetric) or partial (heterotaxy) reversals. While the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is known for its highly determinate development, including stereotyped L/R organ handedness,...
Article
Anatomical left-right (L/R) handedness asymmetry in C. elegans is established in the four-cell embryo as a result of anteroposterior skewing of transverse mitotic spindles with a defined handedness. This event creates a chiral embryo and ultimately an adult body plan with fixed L/R positioning of internal organs and components of the nervous system...