Melissa A. Schilling

Melissa A. Schilling
New York University | NYU · Leonard N. Stern School of Business

Ph.D.

About

87
Publications
331,955
Reads
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11,605
Citations
Citations since 2017
27 Research Items
5253 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230200400600800
20172018201920202021202220230200400600800
20172018201920202021202220230200400600800
20172018201920202021202220230200400600800
Additional affiliations
August 2001 - present
NYU Stern School of Business
Position
  • Professor of Management and Organizations
Education
June 1997
University of Washington Seattle
Field of study
  • Strategy

Publications

Publications (87)
Article
Full-text available
Over the past three decades, platform competition—the competition between firms that facilitate transactions and govern interactions between two or more distinct user groups who are connected via an indirect network—has attracted significant interest from the fields of management and organizations, information systems, economics, and marketing. Des...
Article
Full-text available
Research summary Platform ecosystems have spurred new products and services, sparked innovation, and improved economic efficiency in various industries and technology sectors. A distinctive feature of the platform architecture is its modular and interdependent system of core and complementary components bound together by design rules and an overarc...
Article
Full-text available
Most innovation builds closely on existing knowledge and technology, delivering incremental advances on existing ideas, products, and processes. Sometimes, however, inventors make discoveries that seem very distant from what is known and well understood. How do individuals and firms explore such uncharted technological terrain? This paper extends r...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past three decades, platform competition—the competition between firms that facilitate transactions and govern interactions between two or more distinct user groups who are connected via an indirect network—has attracted significant interest from the fields of management and organizations, information systems, economics, and marketing. Des...
Article
Full-text available
Platform sponsors typically have both incentive and opportunity to manage the overall value of their ecosystems. Through selective promotion, a platform sponsor can reward successful complements, bring attention to underappreciated complements, and influence the consumer’s perception of the ecosystem’s depth and breadth. It can use promotion to ind...
Article
Full-text available
Forward-looking behavior is central to the concept of strategy and strategic management (Barnard, 1938; Hamel and Prahalad, 1994; Mintzberg and Waters, 1985; Tsoukas and Shepherd, 2004). Yet, ironically, mainstream theories and assumptions (e.g., environment that changes in an unpredictable manner, managerial cognition that is characterized by boun...
Article
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This Special Issue has the overarching goal to publish original research works that contribute to the ongoing debate on whether established assumptions in extant management theories still hold true when faced with the pervasive diffusion and adoption of digital technologies. There are several digital technologies—e.g., Internet of Things, 5G, Cloud...
Article
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Firms engage in mergers for many reasons, some of which create value for both the firm’s shareholders and society, some that create value only for the firm’s shareholders, and some that fail even to do that. A considerable body of research concludes that most mergers do not create value for anyone, except perhaps the investment bankers who negotiat...
Article
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Some strategic decisions will long be remembered for being remarkably successful, providing dramatic benefits to customers, investors, or social welfare. The individuals who make these decisions are often called “visionary.” But what enables some people to be visionary? Is it a gift or skill, and can it be learned? In this paper I identify three ma...
Book
Full-text available
The science behind the traits and quirks that drive creative geniuses to make spectacular breakthroughs What really distinguishes the people who literally change the world–those creative geniuses who give us one breakthrough after another? What differentiates Marie Curie or Elon Musk from the merely creative, the many one-hit wonders among us? Qu...
Chapter
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Technology (from the Greek, techne, which means craft, or skill) refers to any manner of systematically applying knowledge or science to a practical application. As such it is one of the central factors motivating the founding, structure, and management of most organizations. Intraorganizational technology can be defined as including all forms of t...
Article
Whether you make cars or mattresses, operate a hospital or a grocery store, or are in some other business, successful innovation depends on understanding what’s driving the technological changes in your industry and anticipating what product and service features consumers will value in the future. In this article, the author describes her proven sy...
Article
Full-text available
Platform sponsors typically have both incentive and opportunity to manage the overall value of their ecosystems. Through selective promotion, a platform sponsor can reward successful complements, bring attention to underappreciated complements, and influence the consumer’s perception of the ecosystem’s depth and breadth. It can use promotion to ind...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous studies have documented a strong association between diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The nature of the relationship, however, has remained a puzzle, in part because of seemingly incongruent findings. For example, some studies have concluded that insulin deficiency is primarily at fault, suggesting that intranasal insulin or inhibiti...
Book
Full-text available
The author does not have rights to distribute the full-text copy online -- only the Table of Contents is provided here. If you are an instructor seeking a review copy or teaching supplements (powerpoint slides, instructors manual, recommended cases and videos, etc.), please use this link to find and contact your sales representative who can arrange...
Book
The authors do not have rights to distribute the full-text online so only the table of contents and front matter are provided here. If you are an instructor seeking a review copy or teaching supplements, please use this link to locate your Cengage representative: http://www.cengage.com/repfinder/ Brief Contents PART ONE INTRODUCTION TO STRATEGIC...
Book
Full-text available
The authors do not have rights to distribute the full-text online so only the table of contents and front matter are provided here. If you are an instructor seeking a review copy or teaching supplements, please use this link to locate your Cengage representative: http://www.cengage.com/repfinder/ Brief Contents PART ONE INTRODUCTION TO STRATEGIC...
Article
Full-text available
There is growing consensus that the goal of antitrust enforcement should be to manage for dynamic efficiency, that is, an appropriate balance between short-run static efficiencies such as reducing costs and maximizing consumer surplus, and the longer-term gains that arise from innovation. However, determining how to incorporate innovation into effi...
Article
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In the early-to-mid 1990s technology alliances suddenly surged to unprecedented levels – roughly 300% growth per year from 1990 to 1995 – and then declined just as precipitously. This massive increase in alliance activity caused the crystallization of a giant component in the global technology network that connected a large portion of the world’s f...
Book
Full-text available
The plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) holds much promise— from reducing dependence on imported petroleum to decreasing greenhouse gas emissions to improving urban air quality. However, there are many barriers to its mainstream adoption regardless of incentives and enticing promises to solve difficult problems. Such vehicles have some limitations owing...
Article
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The interpersonal network structure of an organization directly influences the diffusion and recombination of ideas, and can thus facilitate or impede organizational learning. Most interpersonal networks have “hubs” – individuals that have significantly more connections than does the average member. This raises important questions about how hubs in...
Article
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This symposium aspires to take stock of recent developments in the study of value creation and appropriation in the context of ecosystem. Drawing on the cutting-edge research of senior scholars who have also been active in teaching and in communicating with managers, we consider how the recent upsurge of interest in and understanding of ecosystems...
Article
Research on creativity, scientific discovery, and innovation is growing exponentially in the management literature. This growth is a result of a convergence of at least three major drivers: 1) the increasing perception by managers that innovation is one of, if not the, most important competitive levers for their organizations, 2) rapid increases in...
Chapter
Full-text available
Innovation networks enable agents (individuals, firms, universities etc.) to pool, exchange and jointly create knowledge and other resources. By providing network members access to a wider range of resources than individual members possess, innovation networks can enable members to achieve much more than they could individually. This entry gives an...
Article
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Much research in strategic entrepreneurship has focused on the consequences of network structure for firm performance. Despite this emphasis, little is known about variation in network structure across industries, or about the antecedents of this variation. In a comparative study of alliance networks in 32 industries, we demonstrate substantial var...
Article
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Some ideas have dramatically more impact than others – they may overturn existing paradigms or launch new areas of scientific inquiry. Where do such high impact ideas come from? Are some search processes significantly more likely to lead to breakthrough idea generation than others? In this research, we compare “high impact” papers from the social s...
Article
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The existing research on industrial districts is fragmented, and yields conflicting advice for managers about the benefits and costs of locating in an industrial district. We resolve much of this ambiguity by synthesizing and integrating the existing research, and developing a typology of districts based on the continuous dimensions of need for coo...
Article
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The classic tradeoff between exploration and exploitation in organizational learning has attracted vigorous attention by researchers over the last two decades. Despite this attention, however, the question of how firms can better maintain the balance of exploration and exploitation remains unresolved. Drawing on a wide range of research on populati...
Article
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"Observations, such as the many celebrated inventive entrepreneurs with minimal schooling, lead to the hypothesis that protracted and rigorous education can impede entrepreneurship. Systematic analysis of biographies of noted inventors and entrepreneurs appears not to support the hypothesis. We do find that with time, entrepreneurial and inventor e...
Article
Full-text available
Plotting the performance of a technology against the money or effort invested in it most often yields an S-shaped curve: slow initial improvement, then accelerated improvement, then diminishing improvement. These S-curves can be used to gain insight into the relative payoff of investment in competing technologies, as well as providing some insight...
Article
Full-text available
A considerable body of research utilizes large alliance databases (e.g., SDC, MERIT-CATI, CORE, RECAP, and BIOSCAN) to study interorganizational relationships. Understanding the strengths and limitations of these databases is crucial for informing database selection and research design. In this study I conduct an analysis of five prominent alliance...
Article
Full-text available
In industries with increasing returns, firms are sometimes encouraged to liberally diffuse their technologies to increase their likelihood of becoming the dominant design. The choice of protecting versus diffusing technologies, however, imposes a number of significant tradeoffs. This research develops a comprehensive model of the tradeoffs involved...
Article
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The article investigates the question of whether it is profitable for firms to begin their marketing of innovative products in specific foreign markets, known as lead markets, which are thought to be particularly receptive to such innovations. Such a practice differs from the traditional product launch, which starts in the home market and only expa...
Article
The classic tradeoff between exploration and exploitation in organizational learning has attracted vigorous attention by researchers over the last two decades. Despite this attention, however, the question of how firms can better maintain the balance of exploration and exploitation remains unresolved. Drawing on a wide range of research on populati...
Article
Full-text available
A considerable body of research utilizes large alliance databases (e.g., SDC, MERIT-CATI, CORE, RECAP, and BIOSCAN) to study inter-organizational relationships. Understanding the strengths and limitations of these databases is crucial for informing database selection and research design. I conduct an analysis of five prominent alliance databases, e...
Article
Full-text available
Information technology (IT) enhances coordination both within the firm and between the firm and its external partners. Consequently, IT investment can promote both loosely and tightly coupled organizational forms. Indeed, in some industries, widespread investment in IT is associated with high levels of disaggregation. In other industries, this is n...
Article
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The structure of alliance networks influences their potential for knowledge creation. Dense local clustering provides information transmission capacity in the network by fostering communication and cooperation. Nonredundant connections contract the distance between firms and give the network greater reach by tapping a wider range of knowledge resou...
Chapter
Full-text available
This article describes the recent expansion of research on entrepreneurship, innovation and growth. Although the entrepreneur is widely credited with critical contributions to innovation and growth, the subject of entrepreneurship has virtually disappeared from mainstream theory and standard textbooks. Reasons explaining this gap are indicated. In...
Article
Full-text available
The structure of alliance networks strongly influences their potential for knowledge creation. Dense local clustering provides transmission capacity in the network by fostering communication and cooperation while non-redundant connections contract the distance between firms and give the network greater reach by tapping a wider range of knowledge re...
Article
Full-text available
The structure of alliance networks strongly influences their potential for knowledge creation. Dense local clustering provides bandwidth in the network by fostering communication and cooperation while non-redundant connections contract the distance between firms and give the network greater reach by tapping a wider range of knowledge resources. How...
Article
Full-text available
Despite many decades of study, scientists still puzzle over the process of insight. By what mechanism does a person experience that “Aha!” moment, when sudden clarity emerges from a tangled web of thoughts and ideas? This research integrates psychological work on insight with graph theoretic work on “small-world” phenomenon, to construct a theory t...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, I first provide a brief review of the history of the U.S. video game industry, beginning with the introduction of the Magnavox Odyssey and Atari's Pong, and ending with the 128-bit generation. Next, the generations of competition are analyzed with respect to three competitive dimensions: the ability to provide advanced technology c...
Article
We integrate research on creativity and innovation at the individual, group and interfirm-network levels to develop a level-agnostic definition of a knowledge network. We identify properties of these networks that appear to be common across levels, and show how these properties influence knowledge diffusion and search. We then apply graph theoretic...
Article
Full-text available
In industries characterized by network externalities, the self-reinforcing effects of installed base and the availability of complementary goods can lead to a single (or few) firm(s) controlling nearly all of the market share in a product category. A new entrant may attempt to displace the incumbent standard by introducing a radically improved tech...
Article
Full-text available
in industries characterized by network externalities, the self-reinforcing effects of installed base and the availability of complementary goods can lead to a single (or few) firm(s) controlling nearly all of the market share in a product category. A new entrant may attempt to displace the incumbent standard by introducing a radically improved tech...
Article
Full-text available
Many organizational learning studies have an implicit assumption that the learning rate is maximized through specialization: the more an individual or organization focuses on a particular task, the faster it will improve. However, through contrasting the various learning process theories described in the research on organizational, group, and indiv...
Article
Full-text available
In industries characterized by network externalities, the self-reinforcing effects of installed base and the availability of complementary goods can lead to a single (or few) firm(s) controlling nearly all of the market share in a product category. A new entrant may attempt to displace the incumbent standard by introducing a radically improved tech...
Article
Full-text available
Theories on the motivation underlying firm boundaries have recently sparked renewed debate. What best explains whether a firm relies on market control or hierarchical control to secure required resources? How do the characteristics of the resources come into play? In this study, we consider a comprehensive path model of the governance mode decision...
Article
Full-text available
Examines the factors driving the selection of a dominant design in markets characterized by a single technology architecture. Considers the importance of entry timing, observing that markets characterized by network externalities demonstrate marked path dependency effects. Develops hypotheses concerning the installed base and complementary goods, l...
Article
Full-text available
In industries characterized by network externalities, a single technology standard often rises to dominance, locking out competing technologies. This research demonstrates that despite "path dependency," it is possible to model the technology selection process and predict likely outcomes. This work extends previous work in network externalities by...
Chapter
Full-text available
Modularity is a general systems concept used in multiple disciplines, including technology and management, psychology, biology, and American studies. This chapter describes how the concept of modularity is used across a range of disciplines, and identifies commonalities and differences.
Article
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In many industries, integrated hierarchical organizations have been replaced by nonhierarchical entities that are permeable, interconnected, and modular. Other industries, however, maintain relatively high levels of integration. We use the logic of general systems modularity to explain why in some industries there is a greater use of modular organi...
Article
Full-text available
Though the work of Mary Parker Follett predates the field of stakeholder theory by almost 60 years, and no reference to her work is found in the stakeholder literature, many of the tenets of stakeholder theory echo Follett’s ideas precisely. More importantly, Follett’s work yields a much richer foundation for stakeholder theory, as well as providin...
Article
Full-text available
Many organizational learning studies have an implicit assumption that the learning rate is maximized through specialization: the more an individual or organization focuses on a particular task, the faster they will improve. However, through contrasting the arguments made in the literature on absorptive capacity and the psychology research on learni...
Article
Full-text available
Many systems migrate towards increasing or decreasing modularity, yet no explicit causal models exist to explain this process. This paper builds a general theory of modular systems, drawing on systems research from many disciplines. This general theory is then used to derive a model of inter-firm product modularity, including testable research prop...
Article
Full-text available
In markets that have forces encouraging the adoption of a dominant design, the size of a technology's installed base and the availability of complementary goods may be the most important factors determining its success or failure. This article examines the path dependent nature of technology trajectories, and the self-reinforcing effects of install...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the rapid increased of attention given to new product development (NPD), development project failure rate is still very high. Many companies develop interesting products, but only those firms that are effective in developing products that meet customer needs and efficient in allocating their development resources will succeed in the long ru...
Article
Full-text available
For many industries, new product development is now the single most important factor driving firm success or failure. The emphasis on new products has spurred researchers from strategic management, engineering, marketing, and other disciplines to study the new product development process. Most conclude that in order to be successful at new product...
Article
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Technology markets often exhibit extreme path dependency, enabling random or idiosyncratic events to have dramatic effects on technology success or failure. However, these effects accrue in an ordered way: by impacting a set of factors that have predictable influences on technology adoption. Since firm strategy also impacts these factors, technolog...
Article
Full-text available
Many environmentally oriented state agencies have adopted the mission of ecosystem management. However, existing agency structures have proven to be poorly suited to managing the interdependent components of ecosystems, resulting in interagency conflicts, slow responses, and poor coordination across elements of the ecosystem. In this article, organ...
Article
Full-text available
Although researchers in the fields of mathematics, psychology, biology, and social systems theory have long used the concept of modularity, none of these fields offered an explicit causal model of how and why increasingly modular forms are adopted. The authors apply constructs and models developed in the study of organizational modularity to explai...
Article
Full-text available
Many systems migrate towards increasing or decreasing modularity, yet no explicit causal models exist to explain this process. This paper builds upon a general theory of modular systems (Schilling 2000), to explain the migration of systems towards or away from increasingly modular forms. It then applies this model to a specific context: the adoptio...
Article
Full-text available
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 1997 Technological trajectories are characterized by path dependency; random events may dramatically influence final outcomes. However, these events influence technology selection indirectly, by impacting a set of factors which have predictable effects on technology adoption. Furthermore, these factors are...

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