Melissa Pastore

Melissa Pastore
University of Vermont | UVM · Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources

Ph.D. in Ecology Evolution and Behavior from the University of Minnesota

About

12
Publications
4,744
Reads
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302
Citations
Introduction
My research takes a cross-scale approach to understanding the impacts of global environmental changes spanning processes happening at the leaf and microbe levels to the functioning of whole ecosystems. Learn more at: http://lispastore.weebly.com/. @lispastore
Additional affiliations
August 2020 - February 2022
University of Vermont
Position
  • Postdoctoral Associate
Education
August 2015 - August 2020
University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Field of study
  • Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior
August 2013 - August 2015
Villanova University
Field of study
  • Biology
August 2009 - May 2013
Pennsylvania State University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Cold‐air pooling is a global phenomenon that frequently sustains low temperatures in sheltered, low‐lying depressions and valleys and drives other key environmental conditions, such as soil temperature, soil moisture, vapor pressure deficit, frost frequency, and winter dynamics. Local climate patterns in areas prone to cold‐air pooling are partly d...
Article
Full-text available
Whether the terrestrial biosphere will continue to act as a net carbon (C) sink in the face of multiple global changes is questionable. A key uncertainty is whether increases in plant C fixation under elevated carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) will translate into decades-long C storage and whether this depends on other concurrently changing factors. We invest...
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Full-text available
Global changes can interact to affect photosynthesis and thus ecosystem carbon capture, yet few multi‐factor field studies exist to examine such interactions. Here we evaluate leaf gas exchange responses of five perennial grassland species from four functional groups to individual and interactive global changes in an open‐air experiment in Minnesot...
Article
Full-text available
Uncertainty about long‐term leaf‐level responses to atmospheric CO2 rise is a major knowledge gap that exists because of limited empirical data. Thus, it remains unclear how responses of leaf gas exchange to elevated CO2 vary among plant species and functional groups, or across different levels of nutrient supply, and whether they persist over time...
Article
Full-text available
Theory predicts and evidence shows that plant species that use the C4 photosynthetic pathway (C4 species) are less responsive to elevated carbon dioxide (eCO2) than species that use only the C3 pathway (C3 species). We document a reversal from this expected C3-C4 contrast. Over the first 12 years of a 20-year free-air CO2 enrichment experiment with...
Article
Full-text available
Terrestrial ecosystems sequester carbon from the atmosphere through a single biological process – photosynthesis – and thus considerable research has centered on how global change factors influence aboveground plant dynamics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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Full-text available
Disentangling impacts of multiple global changes on terrestrial carbon cycling is important, both in its own right and because such impacts can dampen or accelerate increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration. Here we report on an eight-year grassland experiment, TeRaCON, in Minnesota, United States, that factorially manipulated four drivers: temper...
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Full-text available
Nie and colleagues suggest a key role for interannual climate variation as an explanation for the temporal dynamics of an unexpected 20-year reversal of biomass responses of C 3 -C 4 grasses to elevated CO 2 . However, we had already identified some climate-dependent differences in C 3 and C 4 responses to eCO 2 and shown that these could not fully...
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Full-text available
Wolf and Ziska suggest that soil and species attributes can explain an unexpected 20-year reversal of C3-C4 grass responses to elevated CO2 This is consistent with our original interpretation; however, we disagree with the assertion that such explanations somehow render our results irrelevant for questioning a long-standing paradigm of plant respon...
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Full-text available
Wetlands have an inordinate influence on the global greenhouse gas budget, but how global changes may alter wetland contribution to future greenhouse gas fluxes is poorly understood. We determined the greenhouse gas balance of a tidal marsh exposed to nine years of experimental carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen (N) manipulation. We estimated net ca...
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Full-text available
Biogeochemical models that incorporate nitrogen (N) limitation indicate that N availability will control the magnitude of ecosystem carbon uptake in response to rising CO2 . Some models, however, suggest that elevated CO2 may promote ecosystem N accumulation, a feedback that in the long term could circumvent N limitation of the CO2 response while m...
Article
Full-text available
Aims Leaf and root phenology play important roles controlling plant productivity and ecosystem function, yet, few studies link patterns of leaf and root phenology across woody species. Trees with diffuse-porous wood anatomy tend to leaf-out before ring-porous species and we expected that increases in transpiration with spring leaf-out would be coup...

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