Melanie Gibson

Melanie Gibson
SOAS, University of London | SOAS · Department of the History of Art and Archaeology

PhD

About

16
Publications
7,237
Reads
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5
Citations
Introduction
I am Editor of the Gingko Library Art Series and convenor for the Postgraduate Diploma in Asian Art at SOAS, London University. My research focuses on the ceramics and glass of the Islamic world and the reception and use of Islamic pattern in 19th century British design. I am currently working on a book about the Arab Hall at Leighton House, London.
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - June 2017
The Courtauld Institute of Art
Position
  • Lecturer
January 2013 - December 2016
New College of the Humanities
Position
  • Head of Faculty
January 2013 - February 2015
Museum of Islamic Art
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
September 2004 - July 2010
SOAS, University of London
Field of study
  • Islamic Art & Archaeology
September 1983 - September 1984
SOAS, University of London
Field of study
  • Islamic Art & Archaeology
October 1978 - June 1981
University of Oxford
Field of study
  • Arabic

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
In 1864 the well-known British artist Frederic Leighton (1830-1896) bought a plot of land on Holland Park Road in London and asked his friend, the architect George Atchison, to build him a house with a large studio. An inveterate traveller and collector, particularly in the Middle East, many of his acquisitions were eventually incorporated into an...
Chapter
Full-text available
The widespread use of glazed wall-tiles in England in the second half of the nineteenth century came out of the industrialisation of the manufacturing process together with a new awareness of the importance of sanitation. From the 1870s onwards tiles were used for the interiors of hospitals, railway stations and ships (the hammam of the Titanic was...
Chapter
Full-text available
An investigation into the manufacture and use of plaster statuary in medieval Iran
Chapter
Full-text available
The adoption of individual Chinese motifs into the Persian artistic language began in the Ilkhanid period (1256–1353) and by the Timurid period (1370–1507), khatā’ī (Pers. ‘from Cathay’), the term with which the Chinese style came to be described, was fully integrated into the artistic repertoire. The nature of the genesis of Ottoman fine wares has...
Article
Full-text available
The mashraba, a drinking vessel with one handle was a characteristic shape of the Timurid period. Several examples in inlaid metal are know and one jade example inscribed with the name and titles of Ulugh Beg, grandson of Timur, who ruled as governor of Samarqand from 1409 until his death in 1449. Examples in ceramic are also rare and the blue-and-...
Thesis
Takūk and Timthāl: a study of glazed ceramic sculpture from Iran and Syria circa 1150-1250 This dissertation catalogues and analyses a group of glazed ceramic sculptures made in Kashan in central Iran and Raqqa in Syria circa 1150-1250. This was a period in which ceramic production achieved technical and aesthetic excellence with a wide output of...
Book
Full-text available
This chapter from a book cataloguing a major collection of Islamic glass focuses on the production of gilded and enamelled glass, a highly-skilled and lengthy process perfected during the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries in Egypt and Syria. The chapter looks at the origins and evolution of the technique as well as the technical aspects and icono...

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