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Melanie Eckle-Elze

Melanie Eckle-Elze
Heidelberg Institute for Geoinformation Technology · Geoinformation for Humanitarian Aid

Master of Science

About

15
Publications
9,159
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343
Citations
Citations since 2017
8 Research Items
323 Citations
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Publications

Publications (15)
Chapter
Today, the trend towards digitalisation has become commonplace everywhere and is changing expectations and goals. Organisations involved in welfare management and the social economy are having to take this development into account as far as their resources and above all their employees are concerned. More than ever, it is becoming clear that digita...
Article
Full-text available
For the last few years, the increasing need for humanitarian support has led to increasing demand and responsibilities for the international humanitarian system. This trend raises questions regarding the use of alternative and complementary data sources and potential additional actors and communities that could be involved in support efforts and co...
Article
Full-text available
Data quality and fitness for purpose can be assessed by data quality measures. Existing ontologies of data quality dimensions reflect, among others, which aspects of data quality are assessed and the mechanisms that lead to poor data quality. An understanding of which source of information is used to judge about data quality and fitness for purpose...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Over the last couple of years, the growing OpenStreetMap (OSM) database repeatedly proved its potential for various use cases, including disaster management. Disaster mapping activations show increasing numbers of contributions, but oftentimes raise questions related to the quality of the provided Volunteered Geographic Information. In order to bet...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Volunteered geographic information can be seen as valuable data for various applications such as within disaster management. OpenStreetMap data, for example, are mainly contributed by remote mappers based on satellite imagery and have increasingly been implemented in response actions to various disasters. Yet, the quality often depends on the local...
Article
Full-text available
Tourism is one of the most economically important industries. It is, however, vulnerable to disaster events. Geotagged social media data, as one of the forms of volunteered geographic information (VGI), has been widely explored to support the prevention, preparation, and response phases of disaster management, while little effort has been put on th...
Article
Full-text available
Zusammenfassung Mit den steigenden Online-Partizipationsmöglichkeiten, die sich im Zuge des Web 2.0 seit geraumer Zeit ergeben, werden immer mehr Daten im Allgemeinen und Geodaten im Speziellen produziert. Durch Entwicklungen in GPS- und Satellitenbildtechnologie, können auch Laien ihre Umgebung und ferne Orte auf einfache Weise digital erfassen. D...
Article
Full-text available
In the past few years, volunteers have produced geographic information of different kinds, using a variety of different crowdsourcing platforms, within a broad range of contexts. However, there is still a lack of clarity about the specific types of tasks that volunteers can perform for deriving geographic information from remotely sensed imagery, a...
Chapter
Full-text available
In the past few years, crowdsourced geographic information (also called volunteered geographic information) has emerged as a promising information source for improving urban resilience by managing risks and coping with the consequences of disasters triggered by natural hazards. This chapter presents a typology of sources and usages of crowdsourced...
Article
Full-text available
Die OpenFloodRiskMap (OFRM) ist ein Entscheidungsunterstützungssystem, welches Entscheidungsträger in der Alarm- und Einsatzplanung und im Hochwasserfall in der Identifi- zierung Kritischer Infrastrukturen (KI) und Navigation zu KI unterstützt. Durch die Zusammenarbeit mit verschiedenen Kommunen wurde die OFRM an deren Bedürfnisse im Hochwassermana...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Floods are considered the most common and devastating type of disasters world-wide. Therefore, flood management is a crucial task for municipalities- a task that requires dependable information to evaluate risks and to react accordingly in a disaster scenario. Acquiring and maintaining this information using official data however is not always feas...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent development in disaster management and humanitarian aid is shaped by the rise of new information sources such as social media or volunteered geographic information. As these show great potential, making sense out of the new geographical datasets is a field of important scientific research. Therefore, this paper attempts to develop a typology...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Identifying the assets of a community that are part of its Critical Infrastructure (CI) is a crucial task in emergency planning. However, this task can prove very challenging due to the costs involved in defining the methodology and gathering the necessary data. Volunteered Geographic Information from collaborative maps such as OpenStreetMap (OSM)...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Over the last couple of years Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) and particularly OpenStreetMap (OSM) have emerged as an important additional source of information in disaster management. The so-called OSM Crisis Maps are primarily developed by OSM contributors who work remotely. While local OSM contributors know their area of interest and re...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
https://heigit.org/geoinformation-for-humanitarian-aid/
Project
AGORA is an interdisciplinary and international research network aimed at advancing knowledge on the use of crowdsourcing and social media for supporting decision-making in disaster risk management with a view to improve the resilience of cities against disasters and extreme events. AGORA aims to support communities in building resilience against natural disasters and extreme events, with a particular focus on flooding in Brazil. We have a strong collaboration with CEMADEN - The Brazilian National Disaster Monitoring and Early-Warning Centre and are partially funded by CAPES Edital Pró-alertas, as a part of the "Alerta - CEPED - USP" project together with other colleagues of the Centre for Research in Disasters of the University of São Paulo. The AGORA network was started by Dr João Porto de Albuquerque at the Institute of Computer Science and Mathematics of the University of São Paulo (Brazil) and at the GIScience Research Group of the University of Heidelberg (Germany), and since his move to the Centre of Interdisciplinary Methodologies of the University of Warwick in January 2016, the network has been expanded to include this institution as well.