Meghan Sobel

Meghan Sobel
Regis University · Department of Communication

Doctor of Philosophy

About

15
Publications
5,740
Reads
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193
Citations
Citations since 2016
10 Research Items
189 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Social media can create opportunities and networks that empower people and advance communities, especially in developing nations. This study examined how Rwandan journalists believe the professional use of the popular online messaging application WhatsApp influences their daily news processes as well as influences their news audiences. In-depth int...
Article
This quantitative content analysis uses 36 years of New York Times international news to understand how conflict coverage is presented to audiences in terms of quantity and geographic focus, whether conflict is covered because of its linkage to US interests, and whether the Times relies on its own personnel for first-hand coverage. Additionally, a...
Article
News media play a role in increasing public understanding of human rights issues. Yet, little scholarship has analysed human rights reporting in developing or post-conflict nations. Interviews with Rwandan journalists revealed that, in this post-genocide era of reconstruction, reporters define human rights broadly and believe reporting on abuses ha...
Article
News media played a prominent role in perpetuating the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Since then, Rwanda has undergone impressive social and economic growth, but the media landscape during this redevelopment remains understudied. Qualitative interviews with Rwandan journalists reveal that reporters censor themselves to promote peace and reunification. Shor...
Article
Analyzing 50 years’ of New York Times international news coverage (N = 20,765), this study extends research on the “shrinking international news hole,” levels of press freedom, agent (e.g., Times correspondent), and “borrowed” news—information gleaned from local media, including social media. Data show a recent, growing role for social media and an...
Book
This book explores how sex trafficking has been reported in the media. The book is set in the context of reportage of this human rights abuse in two varying political landscapes-the United States being a developed democracy and Thailand experiencing continued political turmoil including a May 2014 coup d’état and an accompanying crackdown on free e...
Article
This quantitative content analysis uses sex trafficking as a case study to understand how news reporting techniques evolve as a social problem emerges on the public agenda. Results indicate that as news organizations became more experienced in covering trafficking and the public made more aware of trafficking as a social issue, journalists moved fr...
Article
In 1994 Rwanda, some journalists used their power for evil when government-run media houses perpetrated genocide through what scholars termed “hate media.” Since then, however, Rwanda’s media landscape has changed dramatically and the country has seen tremendous social and economic progress. Building on the tenets of social responsibility and frami...
Article
Despite the well-established power of the media to shape public perceptions of social problems, compassion fatigue is believed to remain prevalent. So what does it take for someone to be compelled to act after reading a story or seeing an image of a prominent issue? This study, a 3-by-2 between subjects experiment, examined the effects of two journ...
Article
This analysis of unnamed sources in newspaper coverage of the attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, finds unnamed sources to be most common just after the attack and in its immediate aftermath. While unnamed sources were prevalent, they were less common than in studies of routine news coverage, suggesting journalists seeking transparency...
Article
Full-text available
The Former Soviet Republics and the Baltic states are a primary source destination for sex traffickers. Drawing on framing theory and the gendered mediation thesis, this study uses a quantitative content analysis and a qualitative textual analysis to analyse how four English-language newspapers in the Former Soviet Republics and the Baltic states r...
Article
Full-text available
Sex trafficking has increasingly become a topic on the public and political agenda. This study revealed that coverage of sex trafficking in U.S. print and broadcast media from 2008–2012 was largely episodic, focused on crime and policy frames, privileged official sources, and neglected survivors’ voices. However, findings suggest a shift toward the...
Article
Full-text available
Mass media play an important role in explaining the issue of female genital cutting and can influence discourse among the general public as well as policy makers. Understanding how news media present female genital cutting has strong implications for the global status of women. This study, a quantitative content analysis, analyzed how 15 years of n...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the vast research on human trafficking, little is known about mass media coverage of the issue. This study, a quantitative content analysis of English-language news coverage of human trafficking in the USA, India, and Thailand, analyzes human trafficking coverage before and after the launch of a large-scale international anti-trafficking tr...

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