Meghan K. Noseworthy

Meghan K. Noseworthy
Natural Resources Canada | NRCan · Canadian Forest Service, Pacific Forestry Centre

M.Sc.

About

12
Publications
2,426
Reads
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194
Citations
Citations since 2016
4 Research Items
109 Citations
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Introduction
Meghan Noseworthy currently works at the Canadian Forest Service, Pacific Forestry Centre, Natural Resources Canada. Meghan does research in Ecology, Entomology and reducing the spread of invasive arthropod pests. Their most recent publication is 'Forest Biosecurity in Canada – An Integrated Multi-Agency Approach'.
Additional affiliations
October 2004 - present
Natural Resources Canada
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Heat treatment is an effective sanitization method used for over half a century to reduce the risk of transporting pests associated with wood products. The determination of precise lethal heat treatment parameters for pests is critical for the development of globally harmonized plant protection regulatory treatment policies. Separation of heat trea...
Article
Full-text available
In Canada, forest biosecurity is primarily under federal jurisdiction as the federal government is the signatory to the International Plant Protection Convention and other international trade agreements. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), which is Canada’s National Plant Protection Organization, has the mandate of analyzing risks, setting...
Article
Addressing the risk from pests present in wood and wood products destined for international trade is an essential step towards minimizing the movement, introduction and establishment of invasive species. One method of managing the pest risk associated with wood commodities is the use of a systems approach that incorporates multiple independent meas...
Article
Full-text available
International trade in wood products brings the risk of the movement of tree pests, which can cause devastating ecosystem and economic damage. International phytosanitary guidelines have been created to help countries that import wood products develop import requirements to minimize pest movement. Requirements may include specific phytosanitary mea...
Article
The Canadian Forest Invasive Alien Species (CanFIAS) database provides point records of alien arthropod (insects and mites) and pathogen (fungi) species found on trees in Canada extracted from more than 100 years of national surveys. Each record includes a species identification, location, year of observation, and host association and is linked ele...
Article
Full-text available
The European hardwood ambrosia beetle (Trypodendron domesticum) and the striped ambrosia beetle (Trypodendron lineatum) are wood-boring pests that can cause serious damage to lumber, resulting in a need for management of these pests in logging and lumber industries. Natural populations of ambrosia beetles exist throughout the world, but movement of...
Article
Full-text available
Species of ambrosia beetle Monarthrum are potentially invasive and pose a threat to forest resources around the world. Due to their cryptic lifestyle, these beetles are difficult to detect and monitor. In 2008, we set up traps baited with synthetic pheromones and host volatiles in mixed coniferous–deciduous forested areas in Metchosin, British Colu...
Article
Full-text available
The banded elm bark beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov was detected for the first time in British Columbia near Kelowna during 2010. Fifty-eight S. schevyrewi were in an experiment that targeted the European elm bark beetle, Scolytus mutistriatus (Marsham). It was a test of the efficacy of a new trap design relative to the multiple funnel trap cur...
Article
The effect of removing lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) and retaining Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) to reduce the risk of disturbance from mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopk.) in mixed conifer stands in southern British Columbia, Canada, on population processes influencing outbreaks of western spr...
Article
Full-text available
Variation in leaf quality includes differences in both primary nutrients and secondary metabolites. Both of these factors can influence the feeding preference and resulting performance of herbivores in ways that are difficult to disentangle when comparing foliage from different sources. Our study was designed to assess the effects of the ratio of t...
Article
Full-text available
Nutritional regulation is a powerful mechanism used by generalist feeders to obtain the balance of nutrients they require from nutritionally diverse, perhaps unbalanced, foods. We examined nutritional regulation in a species with a narrow individual diet breadth: the forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria. Fourth instar caterpillars were prov...
Article
Under neutral (pH 7Á0) conditions, juvenile pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus exhibited significant antipredator responses, of similar intensities, to the chemical alarm cues of conspecifics, an allopatric congener the green sunfish Lepomis cyanellus and the artificial alarm cue of a sympatric prey guild member (Cyprinidae, hypoxanthine-3-N-oxide). Unde...

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Project
This is intended as a community page for collating research on Systems Approach in plant health, based on ISPM 14. It is not for only one project. Please consider joining if you are working on this topic! Just email Megan and ask to be added then you can load research yourself.