Megan A Barela Hudgell

Megan A Barela Hudgell
University of New Mexico | UNM · Center for Evolutionary and Theoretical Immunology

PhD biological Science

About

14
Publications
9,159
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125
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
124 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220510152025

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
The SpTransformer ( SpTrf ) gene family encodes a set of proteins that function in the sea urchin immune system. The gene sequences have a series of internal repeats in a mosaic pattern that is characteristic of this family. This mosaic pattern necessitates the insertion of large gaps, which has made alignments of the deduced protein sequences comp...
Article
Full-text available
The sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus has seven described populations of distinct coelomocytes in the coelomic fluid that are defined by morphology, size, and for some types, by known functions. Of these subtypes, the large phagocytes are thought to be key to the sea urchin cellular innate immune response. The concentration of total coelomo...
Article
Full-text available
Molecular cloning, gene manipulation, gene expression, protein function, and gene regulation all depend on the introduction of nucleic acids into target cells. Multiple methods have been developed to facilitate such delivery including instrument based microinjection and electroporation, biological methods such as transduction, and chemical methods...
Article
Full-text available
The sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, possesses at least seven distinguishable cell populations in the coelomic fluid, which vary in morphology, size, and function. Of these, the large phagocytes, small phagocytes, and red spherule cells are thought to be key to the echinoid immune response. Because there are currently no effective and rap...
Article
Full-text available
The generation of large immune gene families is often driven by evolutionary pressure exerted on host genomes by their pathogens, which has been described as the immunological arms race. The SpTransformer (SpTrf) gene family from the California purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, is upregulated upon immune challenge and encodes the Sp...
Chapter
Full-text available
Correction to: Chapter 13 in: E. L. Cooper (ed.), Advances in Comparative Immunology, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-76768-0_13
Chapter
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The Echinodermata are an ancient phylum of benthic marine invertebrates with a dispersal-stage planktonic larva. These animals have innate immune systems characterized initially by clearance of foreign particles, including microbes, from the body cavity of both larvae and adults, and allograft tissue rejection in adults. Immune responsiveness is me...
Article
Full-text available
Background Genomic regions with repetitive sequences are considered unstable and prone to swift DNA diversification processes. A highly diverse immune gene family of the sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), called Sp185/333, is composed of clustered genes with similar sequence as well as several types of repeats ranging in size from short ta...
Chapter
Full-text available
Innate immune systems in both animals and plants that lack somatic recombination and assembly mechanisms rely on a limited, preset number of genes encoding pathogen-recognition proteins that target universal pathogen-associated molecular patterns and/or monitor pathogen effector activity. To keep up with the ever-expanding diversity and virulence o...
Article
Full-text available
The 13th Congress of the International Society of Developmental and Comparative Immunology took place in Murcia Spain from June 28 to July 3, 2015 at the Victor Villegas Auditorium and Convention Center. There were two or three parallel sessions during the Congress that covered a wide range of immunological topics and brought researchers together f...
Conference Paper
The majority of parasite species exhibit host specificity. In general, our understanding of this phenomenon is poor. We address this question using the digenean Schistosoma mansoni as our model parasite. The larval development of S. mansoni occurs in snails of the genus Biomphalaria. For example, the Neotropical snail B. glabrata supports S. manson...
Conference Paper
The majority of parasite species exhibit host specificity. In general, our knowledge of why a particular parasite can infect some host species but fails to infect others is poor. To address this basic question, I will study the parasite Schistosoma mansoni which infects 200 million people in both Africa and the Neotropics. Its larval development oc...

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