Md Habibullah Bahar

Md Habibullah Bahar
Health Canada | HC · Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA)

BSc (Ag), MSc (Plant Protection), PhD (Entomology)
Scientific Evaluator at Health Canada

About

30
Publications
9,871
Reads
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368
Citations
Introduction
Agricultural entomologist. Key research areas: ecological pest management, insect molecular biology & physiology, climate change, transgenic crops etc. The skills & knowledge were gained through Postdocl Reserch at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Canada), PhD in Applied Entomology from University of New England (Australia), Teaching and Research at Khulna University (Bangladesh), MSc in Plant Protection from University of Goettingen (Germany), and BSc. Ag. (Bangladesh Agricultural University).
Additional affiliations
July 2016 - present
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Position
  • Entomology RA
January 2015 - January 2015
University of Northern British Columbia
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2015 - June 2016
AgQuest Inc.
Position
  • Principal Investigator
Education
February 2008 - August 2011
University of New England (Australia)
Field of study
  • Applied Entomology
April 2002 - March 2004
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen (Germany)
Field of study
  • Plant Protection
November 1995 - November 2001
Bangladesh Agricultural University (Bangladesh)
Field of study
  • Agriculture

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
The currently accepted lower threshold temperature for the development of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), the world's most destructive insect pest of cruciferous crops, is around 6.0°C, and there is no known upper threshold temperature. Neither are there established threshold temperatures for diamondback moth's maj...
Article
Full-text available
Diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), a globally important pest of Brassicaceae crops, migrates into all provinces of Canada annually. Life tables were used to determine the mortality levels contributed by the parasitoid complexes associated with diamondback moth in British Columbia, Ontario, Prince Edward Isl...
Poster
The rape pollen beetle, Brassicogethes viridescens Fabricius (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) is an introduced pest of Brassicaceae plants in eastern North America. The predicted geographical expansion of this pest to major canola growing areas in Canada heightened the need for information on the life cycle of B. viridescens. A field study was carried out...
Article
Full-text available
Aster yellows (AY) is an important disease of Brassica crops and is caused by Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris and transmitted by the insect vector, Aster leafhopper (Macrosteles quadrilineatus). Phytoplasma-infected Aster leafhoppers were incubated at various constant and fluctuating temperatures ranging from 0 to 35 °C with the reproductive host pl...
Poster
Full-text available
Temperature is the central driving factor for the survival and development of insects. Wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) are an important pest of potatoes. Information on the effect of temperatures on wireworm is lacking. This study explored wireworm mortality and development at five constant temperatures (10 to 35°C). Our results showed 100% mort...
Conference Paper
Surveys on the insect parasitoids of diamondback moth (DBM) (Plutella xylostella, Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) were conducted in canola-growing areas across four ecoregions, Boreal Transition, Aspen Parkland, Moist Mixed Grassland and Mixed Grassland in the province of Saskatchewan, Canada during the summers of 2012 to 2014. In each year forty canola...
Conference Paper
Background: Aster yellows (Ay) caused major production losses to canola in western canada in 2000, 2007 and 2012 (olivier et al 2011; miller et al 2013) the disease is caused by a phytoplasma vectored by the aster leafhopper, Macrosteles quadrilineatus A five-point rating scale based on phyllody, virescence and presence of bladder-like pods was dev...
Conference Paper
Survival and performance of aster yellows- (AY-) phytoplasma, its insect vector, the aster leafhopper (Macrosteles quadrilineatus) and the plant host, barley (Hordeum vulgare) were explored at constant and variable temperatures ranging from 0 to 35°C. After 14 days of incubation, leafhopper (LH) adults were found surviving at 0–30°C; at 0°C LH surv...
Article
Full-text available
Thermal sensitivity is a crucial determinant of insect abundance and distribution. The way it is measured can have a critical influence on the conclusions made. Diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) is an important insect pest of cruciferous crops around the world and the thermal responses of polyphagous specie...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The incremental incidence of Aster Yellows (AY) disease caused by phytoplasma (a non-cellular bacteria-like organism) in North America is of great concern. Although there is no prescribed control measure for AY, monitoring and phytosanitary activities can prevent its spread. Knowledge of phytoplasma distribution across plant parts is important to o...
Article
Full-text available
In nature, insects have evolved behavioural and physiological adaptations to cope with short term exposure to extreme temperatures. Extreme heat events may increase as a result of climate change; this in turn will affect insect population dynamics. We examined the effect of abrupt and ecologically relevant gradual exposure to high temperatures on t...
Article
Full-text available
The prevalence of the diamondback moth and its larval parasitoids, was explored across Saskatchewan, Canada. Higher numbers of diamondback moths were recorded early in the season than later and in the Mixed Grassland compared to three other ecoregions. The highest proportion of parasitism was observed in the Boreal Transition ecoregion in early sea...
Article
Full-text available
To understand how researchers are tackling globally important issues, it is crucial to identify whether current research is comprehensive enough to make substantive predictions about general responses. We examined how research on climate change affecting insects is being assessed, what factors are being tested and the localities of studies, from 17...
Data
Dataset This dataset is also available via figshare
Article
Full-text available
Experiments were conducted in small arenas and on whole plants to explore the effect of cotton aphids, Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae), as alternative prey on the predation of Helicoverpa armigera Hubner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae by green lacewing larvae, Mallada signatus Schneider (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). Transgenic Bt (Bollga...
Article
Full-text available
Experiments were conducted in small arenas and on whole plants to explore the effect of cotton aphids, Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae), as alternative prey on the predation of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae by green lacewing larvae, Mallada signatus Schneider (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). Transgenic Bt (Bollga...
Article
Full-text available
Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the effects of constant temperatures (7, 22, and 30°C) and corresponding fluctuating temperatures (0-14, 15-29, and 23-37°C) on the development of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), and its North American parasitoid Diadegma insulare (Hellén). Parasitized third-instar diamondback moth larvae w...
Article
Full-text available
A strain of the fungus Cladosporium sp. (RM16) from an egg of Helicoverpa armigera Hu¨bner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was assessed as a potential biocontrol agent for this pest. Pathogenicity of the fungus was tested against H. armigera eggs and larvae, cotton aphids (Aphis gossypii Glover; Homoptera: Aphididae), and silverleaf whitefly type B (Bemis...
Article
Full-text available
We compared the survival of Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) eggs and larvae on Bt and conventional cotton, in the presence or absence of the generalist predator, green lacewing larvae, Mallada signatus, (Schneider) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). In small arenas, green lacewings consumed a similar number of H. armigera eggs (ave....
Article
Full-text available
Five cultivated mulberry plant varieties, BSRM-34, BSRM-56, BSRM-57, BSRM-58 and BSRM-59, were used to evaluate the effects of plant variety on larval and cocoon characteristics of mulberry silkworm Bombyx mori L. Silkworm larvae undergo their entire larval periods on leaves of mulberry varieties. Different larval characteristics of larval weight,...
Article
Full-text available
The effect of five different botanical extracts-tobacco, neem, garlic, eucalyptus and mehogony-on aphid population on yard long bean was assessed in field, net-house and laboratory conditions at Khulna University, Bangladesh. Aphids were deliberately exposed to the above botanical extracts and then the numbers of live and dead aphids were counted....
Article
Full-text available
Lac is the dermal secretion of lac insect, Kerria lacca Kerr., which is used to make expensive natural dye, burnish, coating materials, in cosmetics and jewelry industry. Though it is very perspective industry and available of host plants over the country especially in southern districts of Bangladesh, lac cultivation is confined within some northe...
Article
Full-text available
The effect of five different botanical extracts-tobacco, neem, garlic, eucalyptus and mehogony-on aphid population on yard long bean was assessed in field, net-house and laboratory conditions at Khulna University, Bangladesh. Aphids were deliberately exposed to the above botanical extracts and then the numbers of live and dead aphids were counted....
Article
Full-text available
Naturally infected leaf samples of betelnut having characteristic symptoms of spots were collected from the campus of Khulna University, Bangladesh. The pathogen of this disease was identified on the basis of growth characters, acervuli production and conidial features on PDA medium as Pestalotia palmarum. The species was found pathogenic on excise...

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Projects

Projects (8)
Project
Nearly 65 years ago, Doug Harcourt developed the first comprehensive life table of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) on the Central Experimental Farm (CEF) in Ottawa, Ontario. To the present day this work is continually cited when authors discuss the life history of the diamondback moth and its parasitoids in Canada. Since the time of Harcourt’s work, the techniques used in life tables and their analysis have changed. We also know a great deal more about the ecology and biology of the diamondback moth. Our goal is to follow up on Harcourt’s work by developing a contemporary life table for the diamondback moth on the CEF and across Canada. Since the time of the original life table study, climate change may have altered the population dynamics of both the diamondback moth and its natural enemies. We will use two methods of constructing a life table. The first life table is influenced by the methods used in Harcourt’s thesis and is an established crop based life table with destructive sampling. The second life table is a contemporary one that is cohort-exposure based using sentinel plants from the lab. A life table of the diamondback moth is indispensable in integrated pest management, since it will describe, among other factors, the composition of natural enemies attacking the diamondback moth, with emphasis on mortality caused by parasitoids. This can help inform us if a specific life stage of the diamondback moth could be exploited by the introduction of new natural enemies, such as, Diadromus collaris, a pupal parasitoid currently under consideration for release.