Maydianne C.B. Andrade

Maydianne C.B. Andrade
University of Toronto | U of T · Department of Biological Sciences at Scarborough

PhD, Cornell University 2000

About

81
Publications
13,947
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
3,142
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2000 - present
University of Toronto
Position
  • Professor
June 2000 - September 2016
University of Toronto
Position
  • Professor, Canada Research Chair
July 1995 - June 2000
Cornell University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (81)
Article
Temperature challenges are one of the leading abiotic causes of success or failure of non-native species in a novel environment, and this is particularly true for low temperatures. Establishing and reproducing in a novel thermal environment can alter survival, behaviour, and traits related to fitness. It has been proposed that plasticity or adaptat...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding factors affecting male mate choice can be important for tracking the dynamics of sexual selection in nature. Male brown widow spiders (Latrodectus geometricus) mate with adult as well as immature (subadult) females. Mating with adults involves costly courtship with a repertoire of signaling behaviors, and typically ends with cannibali...
Article
Theory and empirical work suggest that behaviours such as dispersal and exploration are predictors of invasive success, and that behaviours may shift predictably after invasive populations have established and spread. However, there are limited data on temporal patterns in the distribution of behavioural traits linked to the timeline of establishme...
Preprint
Background: Predicting invasiveness requires understanding the propensity of a given species to thrive in areas with novel ecological challenges. The Australian redback spider, Latrodectus hasselti , a widow spider native to Australia and established in Japan, New Zealand, and Southeast Asia. We hypothesized that human impact is important for succe...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species are common around the world, but we still do not know which traits are most important for successfully establishing in new environments. Different stages of the invasion process, including transport, introduction, establishment, and spread, can act as selective filters for different combinations of phenotypic traits. Theoretical an...
Article
Full-text available
Female choice may be linked to population density if the expected encounter rates with potential mates affects choosiness (the energy and risk engaged to express mate preferences). Choosiness should covary with male availability, which could be assessed using the social cues available during development. We tested whether the exposure of juvenile f...
Article
Sexual cannibalism is an extreme form of sexual conflict that may have broad evolutionary effects on mating behaviour. Latrodectus spiders (∼30 "widow" species) could enable comparative tests of the evolution of sexual cannibalism, but most species are poorly-studied. Here we describe the mating and remating behaviour of a species endemic to South...
Article
Full-text available
Traditionally, sexual selection has been seen as a process in which choosy females select non‐choosy males. Recent studies, however, have challenged this view by showing that males can also be choosy in many species. We assessed the sexual preferences in males of the tropical jumping spider Hasarius adansoni (Audouin, 1826). We measured mating effo...
Article
Full-text available
Female choice is an important driver of sexual selection, but can be costly, particularly when choosy females risk remaining unmated or experience delays to reproduction. Thus, females should reduce choosiness when mate encounter rates are low. We asked whether choosiness is affected by social context, which may provide reliable information about t...
Article
Full-text available
The handicap hypothesis predicts that more elaborate males attract more predators, but are also better able to escape attacks. Thus, a unit increase in trait elaboration has a lower cost for a high-quality male (i.e., differential cost). Although widely accepted, the handicap hypothesis has seldom been appropriately tested, especially concerning th...
Article
In polygynous species, males typically mate with more than one female, and male investment in any one mating should decrease if securing that mating reduces future mating opportunities. In contrast, monogynous males mate only once, so they should invest maximally in that single mating. In two monogynous, sexually cannibalistic Latrodectus spider sp...
Article
Understanding patterns of diversity in sexual signals can give insight into processes initiating, mediating or following from species diversification. Here we focus on female sex pheromones, which are widespread among animals, where some taxa show phylogenetic patterns of variation, but for others, ecological factors better explain pheromone divers...
Article
Mate-searching success is a critical precursor to mating, but there is a dearth of research on traits and tactics that confer a competitive advantage in finding potential mates. Theory and available empirical evidence suggest that males locate mates using mate-attraction signals produced by receptive females (personal information) and avoid inadver...
Article
General insights in sexual selection can be enhanced by the addition of data from under-studied species. Understanding the natural history of these species is acritical first step. Here, we report detailed field observations of Tetragnatha straminea Emerton, 1884, a long-jawed orb weaver common in riparian meadows. Relatively little is known about...
Chapter
Phenotypic plasticity refers to the ability of individuals with a given genotype to show variation in phenotypes under different conditions (e.g., Kelly, Panhuis, & Stoehr, 2012; Pigliucci, 2001; West-Eberhard, 2003), an ability that may be adaptive ifplastic phenotypes have higher fitness than those that are inflexible in the face of environmental...
Chapter
Full chapter is available for free download until May 11, 2019 at https://authors.elsevier.com/b/1YmApEsvgWKow. Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of organisms with a given genotype to develop varied phenotypes under fluctuating environmental conditions. This chapter provides an overview of the conditions under which adaptive phenotypic plastic...
Article
Full-text available
Jumping spiders perform multi-modal displays during courtship and this has been used to study sexual selection and mate choice. However, studies have focused on only a few groups of spiders. Here we describe for the first time the breeding behavior of the tropical jumping spider Hasarius adansoni (Audouin, 1826). Animals were collected in the field...
Article
Spiders are well known for using chemical, vibratory, tactile, and visual signals within mating contexts. All spiders produce silk, and even in non-web building spiders, silk is intimately tied to courtship and mating. Silk produced by females provides a transmission channel for male vibratory courtship signals, while webs and draglines provide a s...
Article
Full-text available
Although some spiders are globally invasive, found at high densities, and may be considered pests (particularly those that are toxic to humans), there are few pest management methods based on experimental data. 'Common wisdom' and advertisements on internet websites assert that a number of natural substances repel spiders. We tested whether the thr...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual conflict over mating frequency has driven the evolution of morphological and behavioural traits across taxa. Interactions may be termed 'coercive' and assumed to arise from conflict when male mating behaviours cause physical injury to females and females appear to resist injurious matings.However, coercion per se occurs only if the behaviour...
Article
http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/49541/title/Opinion--Address-Taxonomic-Skew/
Article
Full-text available
Evidence suggests that certain taxonomic groups are more thoroughly studied than others across a wide range of biological disciplines. Such taxonomic biases have the potential to define our understanding of theory, and limit the generality of our insights. To assess the distribution of taxonomic representation in current and historical animal behav...
Article
Full-text available
Copulatory cannibalism of male ‘widow’ spiders (genus Latrodectus) is a model example of the extreme effects of sexual selection, particularly in L. hasselti and L. geometricus where males typically facilitate cannibalism by females and mate only once. We show that these males can increase their reproductive success by copulating with final-instar,...
Article
Copulatory cannibalism of male ‘widow’ spiders (genus Latrodectus) is a model example of the extreme effects of sexual selection, particularly in L. hasselti and L. geometricus where males typically facilitate cannibalism by females and mate only once. We show that these males can increase their reproductive success by copulating with final-instar,...
Article
Copulatory cannibalism of male ‘widow’ spiders (genus Latrodectus) is a model example of the extreme effects of sexual selection, particularly in L. hasselti and L. geometricus where males typically facilitate cannibalism by females and mate only once. We show that these males can increase their reproductive success by copulating with final-instar,...
Article
Understanding the causes of variation in paternity is an important goal of research in sexual selection. While much progress has been made in understanding the dynamics of pre-copulatory mate choice and competition, post-copulatory processes that affect paternity are much less well understood. Distinguishing cryptic female choice (CFC, biases in pa...
Article
Males often exercise mate choice when mating frequency is constrained, costs of choice are low and variation in female quality and/or expected paternity can be reliably detected. Across invertebrates, males use sex pheromones to discern female mating status, but there are few demonstrations that information about expected fecundity (‘quality’) is e...
Article
Full-text available
Mate guarding is one of the most common tactics in sperm competition. Males are expected to guard their mates when costs of guarding (accrued from physical confrontations with rivals and/or reduced foraging) are low relative to the benefits of ensuring mating opportunities and paternity. We investigated mate guarding in the jumping spider Phidippus...
Article
Sibling cannibalism occurs across diverse taxa and can affect population size and structure, as well as the fitness of parents and the cannibal, via density effects and variation in individual propensity to cannibalize. We examined these effects on sibling cannibalism in juveniles of a web-building spider (Latrodectus hasselti, Australian redbacks)...
Article
Strong male mate preferences have been documented in species with otherwise conventional sex roles in the laboratory, and across taxa, male preferences generally focus on indicators of female fecundity and sperm competition risk. However, the few field studies of male choice rarely show equally strong effects. This suggests that costs of choice in...
Article
Variation in sperm production is strongly influenced by mating system across taxa. Recent work in spiders suggests that males of some species show termination of spermatogenesis before their adult molt and thus an inability to produce sperm after maturation. This permanent sperm depletion (PSD) has been hypothesized to co-occur with monogyny, genit...
Article
Developmental plasticity allows individuals to match their phenotype to the competitive environment they are most likely to encounter. Although there are numerous studies that demonstrate adaptive shifts in life-history and metric traits, we still have a poor understanding of whether internal physiological processes demonstrate plasticity and wheth...
Article
Full-text available
Ownership asymmetries lead to owners (residents) having substantial contest advantages over intruders, and this may overwhelm the fighting advantage of large body size. Why such an ownership advantage occurs, however, is not clear and requires further investigation. Here, we use a jumping spider, Phidippus clarus, to examine the role of ownership a...
Article
Spider mating behaviour is varied and often surprising. In the past few decades, there has been a shift from descriptive natural history approaches to a more manipulative, theory-based dissection of the behavioural and evolutionary ecology of mating. This approach has yielded evidence in support of important underlying themes of sexual selection. I...
Article
Full-text available
The jumping spider Phidippus clarus uses signals that combine visual and substrate-borne vibrations, which predict the outcome of male--male competition and are important to copulation success. We investigated the function of males' substrate-borne vibrations by examining phenotypic correlates of vibratory signal traits and assessing whether these...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, work has shown that multimodal communication is common throughout the animal kingdom but the function of multimodal signals is still poorly understood. Phidippus clarus are jumping spiders in which males produce multimodal (visual and vibrational) signals in both male–male (aggressive) and male–female (courtship) contexts. The P. clarus m...
Article
Full-text available
Opponent asymmetries often determine the probability of winning a fight in agonistic situations. In many animal systems, the asymmetries that drive the dynamics and outcome of male—male contests are related to resource holding potential (RHP) or territory ownership. However, recent studies have shown that this is not the case among females and sugg...
Article
1. Increases in longevity from dietary restriction (DR) have been linked to the evolution of physiological strategies for maintaining lifetime reproductive output despite periods of nutritional deficiency. If this is the case, then reproductive life history and mating status should determine whether or not dietary restriction increases longevity. 2...
Article
Adaptive foraging tactics are shaped by genes, the environment and gene–environment interactions. Because of relatively high levels of agonism toward conspecifics, spiders have been a popular focus for behavioral–ecological examinations of conspecific predation, or cannibalism. Surprisingly, studies examining the underlying, proximate assumption th...
Article
Unwiderstehlich: Aminosaurederivate werden sehr selten von Arthropoden als Pheromone genutzt. Die zu den Witwen gehorende Spinne Latrodectus hasselti (siehe Bild) nutzt eine einzigartige Verbindung (siehe Strukturformel), um ihre Mannchen anzulocken. Die Molekulkonfiguration spielt eine wichtige Rolle beim chemischen Kommunikationssystem dieser Spi...
Article
Full-text available
In many animal taxa, prior contest experience affects future performance such that winning increases the chances of winning in the future (winner effect) and losing increases the chances of losing in the future (loser effect). It is, however, not clear whether this pattern typically arises from experience effects on actual or perceived fighting abi...
Article
(Figure Presented) Irresistible: Amino acid derivatives are very rarely used as pheromones by arthropods. The widow spider Latrodectus hasselti (see picture) uses a unique compound (see formula) to lure its males. The molecular configuration plays an important role in this unique chemical communication system.
Article
Full-text available
Female decision rules can influence the nature and intensity of sexual selection on males, but empirical demonstrations of rules underlying choice are rare. We hypothesized that female choice is largely based on a courtship duration threshold in the Australian redback spider (Latrodectus hasselti) because females kill males before copulation is com...
Article
Adaptive developmental plasticity has been demonstrated across a number of taxa in response to variables such as photoperiod, resource abundance, and predator presence. Demographics also vary temporally and spatially within populations, but few studies have examined the possibility that developmental plasticity in response to changes in these varia...
Article
Full-text available
Effects of diet on longevity are complex because acquired resources are shared among growth, reproduction and somatic maintenance. We simplify these axes by examining how dietary restriction and competitive contexts affect longevity using semelparous males of the Australian redback spider (Latrodectus hasselti). Plastic development of L. hasselti m...
Article
In the field, phenotypic determinants of competitive success are not always absolute. For example, contest experience may alter future competitive performance. As future contests are not determined solely on phenotypic attributes, prior experience could also potentially alter phenotype-fitness associations. In this study, we examined the influence...
Article
When males compete with rivals in the presence of females, there may be a trade-off between courtship and competition. We examined responses of female redback spiders, Latrodectus hasselti, to courtship from rival males under different competitive contexts. We paired size-matched males with females, and assessed correlates of male mating success. W...
Article
Quantifying primary sex ratios is necessary for studies in a wide range of areas including adaptive sex ratio modification, population demography, and sex-biased developmental mortality. Adult and penultimate male spiders are easy to sex, due to the great thickening of the male pedipalps, which are used for delivering sperm to the female reproducti...
Article
In studies of sexual selection, larger size is often argued to increase male fitness, and relatively smaller males are explained by genetic and/or environmental variation. We demonstrate that a size-development life-history trade-off could underlie the maintenance of a broad, unimodal distribution of size in male redback spiders (Latrodectus hassel...
Article
Assessment strategies are an important component in game theoretical models of contests. Strategies can be either based on one's own abilities (self assessment) or on the relative abilities of two opponents (mutual assessment). Using statistical methodology that allows discrimination between assessment types, we examined contests in the jumping spi...
Article
Our understanding of selection in nature stems mainly from whole-season and cross-sectional estimates of selection gradients. These estimates suggest that selection is relatively constant within, but fluctuates between seasons. However, the strength of selection depends on demographics, and because demographics can vary within seasons, there is a g...
Article
In many species, selection acts on males to recognize female reproductive status at a distance using pheromones. Unmated females may actively seek to attract males; however, mated females may become cryptic to avoid attracting additional males if multiple matings are costly. Although females of many species cease pheromone production after mating,...
Article
Full-text available
Despite widespread recognition that intersexual interactions shape reproductive strategies, studies of male competition do not typically include effects imposed by females. In cannibalistic redback spiders, escalated fighting between rival suitors is predicted, as males are unlikely to mate with more than one female, and strong first-male sperm pre...
Article
In species where virgin females have higher reproductive value to males than nonvirgin females, selection will favour males that can discriminate female reproductive status. Similarly, while virgin females may actively seek to attract males, nonvirgin females may seek crypticity after mating if copulation is costly. Here we show that Australian red...
Article
Summary 1. Moya-Laraño et al . (2002; Evolution 56 , 420-425) showed that female-biased sexual size dimorphism is more pronounced in tree-dwelling spider species than in species inhabiting lower-lying substrates. They proposed the Gravity Hypothesis for sexual size dimorphism: small size should be advantageous for males in habitats where successful...
Article
Full-text available
Mate searching is a risky behavior that decreases survival by increasing predation risk and the risk of energy depletion. However, few studies have quantified actual mortality during mate search, making it difficult to predict mate searching and mating strategies. Using a mark and recapture study, we examined mate-searching success in a highly sexu...
Article
In some spiders, a discrete portion of the male's copulatory organ (the apical sclerite) breaks off during copulation and remains in the female's reproductive tract. Apical sclerites may prevent insemination by rivals (sperm competition), stimulate females to favourably bias paternity (cryptic choice) or breakage may reflect sexual conflict over co...
Article
Full-text available
Bateman's principle predicts the intensity of sexual selection depends on rates of increase of fecundity with mating success for each sex (Bateman slopes). The sex with the steeper increase (usually males) is under more intense sexual selection and is expected to compete for access to the sex under less intense sexual selection (usually females). U...
Article
Full-text available
Male redback spiders (Latrodectus hasselti) maximize paternity if they copulate twice with their cannibalistic mate. Facilitating cannibalistic attack during their first copulation yields paternity benefits. However, females have paired sperm-storage organs inseminated during two separate copulations, so males that succumb to partial cannibalism du...
Article
Full-text available
It has been proposed that multiple sperm storage organs (spermathecae) could allow polyandrous females to control paternity. There is little conclusive evidence for this since insemination of individual spermathecae is generally not experimentally manipulable. Here, we examined sperm use patterns in the Australian redback spider (Latrodectus hassel...
Article
Full-text available
The Australian scaly cricket, Ornebius aperta, can copulate over 50 times with the same partner; the benefits of such extreme repeated copulation are unclear. We support the hypothesis that repeated copulation increases insemination success, as the number of sperm transferred increases with each spermatophore. This probably increases paternity for...
Article
Full-text available
Many sperm competition studies have identified copulation duration as an important predictor of paternity. This result is often interpreted as a sperm transfer effect--it is assumed that sperm transfer is limited by copulation duration. Here we test the assumption of duration-dependent sperm transfer in the Australian redback spider, Latrodectus ha...
Article
Full-text available
Males of many web-building spiders abandon their webs at maturity to search for a potential mate. Since wandering can be very risky, and females are often widely distributed, males should use any cues that might ensure rapid and accurate location of conspecific females. Although it has long been assumed that mate-searching male spiders locate femal...
Article
Full-text available
Male redback spiders twist their abdomens onto the fangs of their mates during copulation and, if cannibalized (65% of matings), increase their paternity relative to males that are not cannibalized. The adaptive male sacrifice hypothesis proposes that this increased reproductive payoff from a single mating outweighs the residual reproductive value...
Article
In the Australian redback spider, Latrodectus hasselti, males typically use their paired copulatory organs (palps) to copulate twice with a single female then sacrifice themselves to their cannibalistic mates in a strategy that increases their paternity in that one mating, but leads to death. This type of terminal investment in one mating is predic...
Article
Full-text available
Mating in the scaly cricket Ornebius aperta often includes the transfer of many spermatophores to individual females during extended copulatory interactions. We manipulated male condition in staged matings to determine whether this could explain variation in the number of repeated copulations seen across pairs. Males on a high nutrient diet were in...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Cornell University, Aug., 2000. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 182-183).
Article
Male Australian redback spiders (Latrodectus hasselti Thorell: Theridiidae) place their abdomens directly over their mate's mouthparts during copulation, increasing the likelihood of sexual cannibalism. Male sacrifice may be adaptive because cannibalized males increase their paternity relative to those that are not eaten. Despite male sacrifice beh...
Article
The calling song of male crickets, including Oecanthus nigricornis (Walker), attracts females for mating and provides a model system of sexual communication. We give the first conclusive identification of a feature of cricket song that is both attractive to females and indicates a phenotypic feature (body size) that determines male mating success a...
Article
The calling song of male crickets, including Oecanthus nigricornis (Walker), attracts females for mating and provides a model system of sexual communication. We give the first conclusive identification of a feature of cricket song that is both attractive to females and indicates a phenotypic feature (body size) that determines male mating success a...
Article
Full-text available
During copulation, male redback spiders (Latrodectus hasselti: Theridiidae) position themselves above the female's jaws. This apparent male complicity in sexual cannibalism is favored by sexual selection because cannibalized spiders receive two paternity advantages. First, cannibalized males copulated longer and fertilized more eggs than those that...
Article
Pea aphids show intraclonal variability in antipredator behaviour. Among the offspring of a single parthenogenetically reproducing female, some individuals drop from the plant in response to alarm pheromone while others remain on the plant. We demonstrate that this intraclonal behavioural variability can be altered by selection. The proportion of a...

Network