May Friedman

May Friedman
Ryerson University · Department of Social Work

About

26
Publications
2,463
Reads
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294
Citations
Citations since 2016
18 Research Items
277 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
In this article, we reflect on the pivot to online research creation in COVID’s wake, and offer a gallery of ten films that emerged through on-line multimedia story-making under lockdown conditions. We describe what new, online research creation has meant for us as critical disability and intersectionality scholars who work with creative visual met...
Article
Over the past decade, we have worked alongside storytellers to bring their stories into the world. These encounters have been challenging, exciting, and intimate. In this paper, we reflect on a digital/multimedia storytelling project in which we engaged with people who have experienced weight stigma in fertility, pregnancy, and motherhood care. We...
Article
What is the impact of bringing unrealistic and overwhelming conditions of motherhood into the context of a global pandemic? This article aims to explore the impacts of maternal expectations and experiences in the time of COVID-19. Through first person accounts of eighty self-identified mothers parenting through COVID, we aim to explore good mother...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we explored the experiences of people in larger bodies seeking fertility and/or pregnancy care through a reproductive justice lens, integrating an understanding of weight stigma with an understanding of who has access to reproductive technologies, who is “allowed” to become pregnant, and the discourses that surround pregnancy. We con...
Article
Intersectionality involves the study of the ways that race, gender, disability, sexuality, class, age, and other social categories are mutually shaped and interrelated through forces such as colonialism, neoliberalism, geopolitics, and cultural configurations to produce shifting relations of power and oppression. The concept does not always offer a...
Article
Full-text available
As scholars, artists, and activists continue to contend with the question of who has a future, we are drawn to the relationship between fat and the social construction of time. In this introduction to the special issue of Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society, we explore what fat reveals about time and what fat studie...
Article
What lessons about linearity are illuminated by the stories that engage our experience of queer fat bodies? The authors examine stories generated in the collaborative, community-based research project Through Thick and Thin. They analyze a selection of 3- to 7-minute microdocumentaries produced in the project that feature assemblages of queer sexua...
Article
My Mad Fat Diary profiles young people falling in and out of love, fighting with their parents, experimenting with drugs and alcohol, and testing limits. Yet the show offers a fresh look at tired tropes by ignoring dramatic conventions that suggest that ugly truths or non-normative bodies should remain out of view and instead sheds light on ignored...
Article
In this study we examine how discourses of obesity and eating disorders reinforce cissexist and heteronormative body standards. Sixteen queer women in Canada produced autobiographical micro-documentaries over the course of two workshops. We identifed three major themes across these flms: bodily control, bodies as sites of metamorphosis, and celebra...
Article
In the context of service restructuring that has gravely impacted quality of life for social workers and the people with whom they work, this paper considers the ways that social work education can better support social justice-based social work practices in urban communities in Canada. The paper’s authors attended a fall 2013 Ryerson University fo...
Article
This article seeks to examine the scholarly journal articles and print media that describe the intersections of child protection and pediatric “obesity,” arguing that presentations of these cases and related interventions rest at the nexus of dominant discourses of child-centered parenting and fears of the “obesity epidemic.” The messaging in both...
Article
Here Comes Honey Boo Boo (2012-) is a gleeful spectacle of a show, filled with fat bellies, loud bodies, messy food and laughter. As much parody as ‘reality’ TV, the show profiles a southern US family as emblematic ‘rednecks’ and invites viewers to watch, laugh and judge. Yet in the depths of this heavily mediated version of southern American famil...
Book
Mothers have consistently relied upon one another for guidance and support as they navigate the difficult world of parenting. For many women, the increasingly established online community of "mommyblogs" now provides a source of camaraderie and support that acknowledges both the work of mothering and the implications of its undertaking. Beyond thei...
Article
When they look back, what will they think about mothers? Who were we, what did we do and how did we feel about our mothering? In the mamasphere we see the creation of maternal history, a history both intimate and at arm's length; a history more variegated than any chronicling of motherhood that has come before, yet nonetheless limited; mommyblogs w...

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