Maxwell Hope

Maxwell Hope
University of Delaware | UDel UD · Department of Linguistics and Cognitive Science

Master of Arts
Working on gender expansive quantitative techniques in sociophonetics

About

14
Publications
6,830
Reads
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33
Citations
Citations since 2016
14 Research Items
33 Citations
201620172018201920202021202202468101214
201620172018201920202021202202468101214
201620172018201920202021202202468101214
201620172018201920202021202202468101214
Introduction
Maxwell Hope (formerly: Schmid) - he/him, they/them - currently works at the Department of Linguistics and Cognitive Science, University of Delaware. Maxwell does research in Sociolinguistics, Sociophonetics, and Communication Science and Disorders. At present, his interests revolve around those who are gender nonbinary, the phonetics of nonbinary speech, and on nonbinary pronoun use within and outside of the transgender community. Their current project is 'Language and Gender'.
Additional affiliations
August 2020 - present
University of Delaware
Position
  • PhD Candidate
May 2019 - present
Nemours Children’s Health System
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Creating and testing synthetic voices for research purposes Assisting in creation of ModelTalker synthetic voices for patients with ALS
Education
August 2018 - May 2020
University of Delaware
Field of study
  • Linguistics & Cognitive Science
August 2012 - May 2017
Pennsylvania State University
Field of study
  • French
August 2012 - May 2017
Pennsylvania State University
Field of study
  • Linguistics

Publications

Publications (14)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Acoustic cues of voice gender influence not only how people perceive the speaker’s gender (whether that person is a man, woman, nonbinary, etc.), but also how they perceive certain phonemes produced by that person. One such sociophonetic cue is the distinction between [s] and [ʃ] in English, which depends on the speaker’s (perceived) gender. Women...
Article
Few studies on voice perception have attempted to address the complexity of gender perception of ambiguous voices. The current study investigated how perception of gender varies with the complexity of the listener’s own gender conception and identity. We explicitly recruited participants of all genders, including those who are gender expansive (i.e...
Poster
Full-text available
How different groups (cisgender vs gender expansive) conceive of gender affects voice gender perception
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Perception of gender in voice is not an under-researched area. Previous studies have been conducted in the hopes of pinpointing what aspects of voice (e.g. fundamental frequency, intonation, etc.) carry the largest cues for skewing gender perception. These studies have to date been conducted within the framework of the gender binary, i.e. men's vs....
Poster
Full-text available
Recent research has demonstrated growing acceptance of gender-neutral and nonbinary pronouns and highlighted complexities in their usage, but comparatively little attention has been given to reflexive pronouns. Although singular they and them are quickly becoming part of mainstream English, the reflexive variants (themself/themselves ) cause some c...
Article
Full-text available
Because standard English lacks a true a gender-neutral singular pronoun, there has long been debate over how to refer to generic persons whose genders are unknown, or those who reject binary male or female identities. Singular (or epicene) ‘they’ has a long history as a pronoun to refer to individuals of unknown gender (Balhorn, 2004), and has also...
Article
Full-text available
Personality, prescriptivism, and pronouns: Factors influencing grammaticality judgments of gender-neutral language – CORRIGENDUM - Volume 35 Issue 4 - Evan D. Bradley, Maxwell Schmid, Hannah Lombardo
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Gender identity plays a role in speech production, distinct from the effects of biological sex, including pitch and intonation. Women generally produce higher vocal pitch than men, but this is subject to cultural norms. Women and men also differ in intonation patterns. Transgender men and women tend to pattern according to their gender identity, ra...
Poster
Full-text available
A descriptive look at vocal pitch and intonation characteristics of non-binary people who are native speakers of American English. Those who are gender non-binary pattern in the middle of men and women for fundamental frequency (F0) and appear to mix characteristics of intonation of both men and women.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent linguistic research has demonstrated growing acceptance of gender-neutral and nonbinary pronouns by English speakers, and highlighted complexities in their usage, but comparitively little attention has been given to gender-neutral reflexive pronouns. Although singular they and t hem are quickly becoming part of mainstream English, the reflex...
Preprint
Full-text available
The decreasing use of the standard form nous in favor of on has been well-documented in several varieties of French, and marks a distinction between written and colloquial spoken norms. It has been suggested in the literature that use of on for referents other than the third and first person plural may also be emerging, driven by the vague referenc...
Preprint
Full-text available
The lack of a true gender-neutral singular personal pronoun for the third person in standard English has led to many attempts to reform the language, most of which have met with limited success. Singular/epicene ‘they’ has a long history of use, but has drawn criticism from prescriptivist grammarians. Newly coined pronouns have not gained widesprea...
Preprint
Full-text available
Pronunciation in a second language can sometimes be facilitated by visual information, including orthography. This is particularly true for languages with transparent orthographies, moreso than for those with opaque orthographies. In fact, non-local orthographic information is less useful to learners, and can lead learners to pronunciation errors,...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The lack of a true gender-neutral personal pronoun in standard English has led to numerous attempts to reform the language, most of which have had limited success. In the past, some style guides prescribed ‘he’ for a generic person, which is today seen as sexist. Alternatives like ‘he or she’ have been criticized for assuming a gender binary. Singu...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Determine what factors influence attitudes toward gendered/gender-neutral language.