Maximilian A. Friehs

Maximilian A. Friehs
Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences | CBS

PhD
Please don't hesistate to contact me if you like to chat about research or think I can contribute to a project :)

About

25
Publications
6,879
Reads
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361
Citations
Citations since 2016
25 Research Items
359 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Introduction
I'm a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Max-Planck Institute for Human and Cognitive Brain Sciences in the Group Cognition and Plasticity as well as a Visiting Research Fellow at University Collge Dublin. My research is focused on the modulation of action control via brain stimulation and stress. Furthermore, I'm is interested in human-computer interaction in the context of video games. Please feel free to contact me any time! For a detailed CV please refer to: https://tinyurl.com/CV-Friehs.
Additional affiliations
October 2021 - present
University College Dublin
Position
  • Visiting Researcher

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Full-text available
Processing ambiguous situations is a constant challenge in everyday life and sensory input from different modalities needs to be integrated to form a coherent mental representation on the environment. The bouncing/streaming illusion can be studied to provide insights into the ambiguous perception and processing of multi-modal environments. In short...
Article
Full-text available
This work explores perceptions of performance enhancer usage in esports. Specifically, we explored the perception of: food and food supplements; non-medical use of prescription drugs; drugs with some social acceptance (e.g. alcohol, nicotine, cannabis); drugs with lower social acceptance (e.g., psychedelics, opioids); and non-invasive brain stimula...
Article
Full-text available
rich body of research suggests that self-associated stimuli are preferentially processed and therefore responses to such stimuli are typically faster and more accurate. In addition, people have an understanding of what they consider their “Self” and where it is located, namely near the head and upper torso—further boosting the processing of self-re...
Article
Full-text available
One important aspect of cognitive control is the ability to stop a response in progress and motivational aspects, such as self-relevance, which may be able to influence this ability. We test the influence of self-relevance on stopping specifically if increased self-relevance enhances reactive response inhibition. We measured stopping capabilities u...
Article
Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) is widely used to explore the role of various cortical regions involved in a multitude of motor and cognitive processes. Recently, tES has been discussed as being able to potentially enhance performance in sports and even been suggested as a potential way of boosting performance in competitions. In this sco...
Article
Full-text available
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is widely used to explore the role of various cortical regions for reactive response inhibition. In recent years, tDCS studies reported polarity-, time- and stimulation-site dependent effects on response inhibition. Given the large parameter space in which study designs, tDCS procedures and task proced...
Article
Full-text available
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a form of non-invasive brain stimulation that has been used to modulate human brain activity and cognition. One area which has not yet been extensively explored using tDCS is the generation of false memories. In this study, we combined the DRM task with stimulation of the left anterior temporal lobe...
Article
Full-text available
Stopping an already initiated action is crucial for human everyday behavior and empirical evidence points toward the prefrontal cortex playing a key role in response inhibition. Two regions that have been consistently implicated in response inhibition are the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the more superior region of the dorsolateral prefro...
Article
Full-text available
As digital gaming has grown from a leisure activity into a competitive endeavor with college scholarships, celebrity, and large prize pools at stake, players search for ways to enhance their performance, including through coaching, training, and employing tools that yield a performance advantage. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a...
Article
Full-text available
The amino acid tyrosine is the precursor of dopamine and norepinephrine and can be administered as a dietary supplement. Previous studies have demonstrated that the intake of tyrosine can enhance both working memory performance and response inhibition (e.g., Colzato et al., Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 72013; Colzato et al., Neuropsycholog...
Article
Full-text available
Resolving cognitive interference is central for successful everyday cognition and behavior. The Stroop task is a classical measure of cognitive interference. In this task, participants have to resolve interference on a trial-by-trial basis and performance is also influenced by the trial history, as reflected in sequence effects. Previous neuroimagi...
Article
Full-text available
The head fake in basketball describes an action during which players gaze in one direction, but pass the ball to the opposite direction. This deception can be modeled in the lab as a kind of interference resolution task. In such tasks, the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (lDLPFC) has been shown to play a critical role. In the present study, tra...
Article
Full-text available
The effect of stress on working memory has been traced back to a modulation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). We investigated the effects of neuromodulation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (lDLPFC) after exposure to psychosocial stress through the Socially Evaluated Cold Pressure Test (SECPT). The hypothesis was that neuromodulation intera...
Preprint
BACKGROUND A lack in the ability to inhibit prepotent responses, or, more generally, a lack of impulse control, is associated with several disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia as well as general damage to the prefrontal cortex. The Stop-Signal Task (SST) is a reliable and established measure of respons...
Article
Full-text available
BackgroundA lack of ability to inhibit prepotent responses, or more generally a lack of impulse control, is associated with several disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia as well as general damage to the prefrontal cortex. A stop-signal task (SST) is a reliable and established measure of response inhibition. Ho...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Player experience research tends to focus on immersive games that draw us into a single play session for hours; however, for casual games played on mobile devices, a pattern of brief daily interaction---called snacking ---may be most profitable for companies and most enjoyable for players. To inform the design of snacking games, we conducted a cont...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Through free choice, individuals can exert control over the environment and experience agency. Research has suggested that tailoring aspects of choice to a player's type can provide benefits; however, commercial Role Playing Games (RPGs) generally provide static opposing options from a spectrum (e.g., paragon versus renegade). To inform the design...
Article
Full-text available
The n-back task is an established measure of an individual's working memory. In this task, participants have to continuously update their working memory to react to a stimulus correctly. For the verbal n-back task in particular, the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (lDLPFC) plays a key role in working memory updating and a higher activation of t...
Article
Full-text available
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive method of modulating human brain activity and potentially alters performance in cognitive tasks. Often it is assumed that effects of tDCS modulation depend on the polarity—anodal stimulation typically boost cognitive processes whereas cathodal stimulation hampers them. While most tDCS...
Article
Full-text available
The stop-signal task (SST) is assumed to reliably measure response inhibition; specifically, in this task participants sometimes have to withhold a response according to the onset of a sudden cue. The response-stopping process is estimated by a stochastic model that delivers the stop-signal reaction time (SSRT; Verbruggen & Logan, 2009), that is, t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We tend to treat the 18-55 demographic of gamers as a monolithic and homogenous group, even though the older ones witnessed the entire rise of the videogame and the younger ones were born into a world with MMORPGs. We present a cross-sectional study of 2747 crowdsourced players aged 18-55 and conduct linear regressions of age on several measures of...

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