Maxime Poulain

Maxime Poulain
Ghent University | UGhent · Department of Archaeology

PhD

About

24
Publications
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Introduction
Post-doc at Ghent University's Department of Archaeology (Historical Archaeology Research Group). My most recent project deals with the material culture of medieval Bruges and its outports along the Zwin tidal inlet, an international melting pot of people, goods and ideas.

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
In contrast to what films such as Titanic would have people believe, scientific knowledge about ocean liners is fairly limited. These boats and their material culture, however, functioned as symbols of modernity par excellence and thus allow a better understanding of the advent of a new world at the turn of the 20th century. The focus of this artic...
Article
Full-text available
Excavations in Sint-Lievens-Houtem (Flanders, Belgium), an important medieval pilgrimage village, uncovered a fourteenth-century refuse pit. This feature contained a fragment of a rare Andalusī moulded lustreware vessel, dating to the mid or second half of the twelfth century. The reconstruction of the vessel’s itinerary aids in understanding how a...
Article
50 free online copies of the online pre-publication at: http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/txcgnzizhI2KW8NQCEHM/full Grasslands pose a particular problem in terms of archaeological surveying, as no material is ploughed up to the surface. Although finds in molehills are often the only source of information available on sites with such low visibilit...
Article
In 1595, the Portuguese merchant banker Duarte Ximenez bought the Blauwhof, a castle-like estate in the Flemish countryside. An assemblage of pottery, recovered from the moat adjacent to the estate’s manor house, testifies to the status and hybrid identity of this 17th-century immigrant family. Although they were well assimilated into Antwerp’s hig...
Article
Full-text available
Between 2002 and 2004, excavations on the castle of Middelburg (Belgium) revealed ample pottery assemblages dating to the 16th and 17th centuries. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC–MS) analysis of preserved surface residues on these ceramics allowed the identification of biomarkers for animal and vegetal foods, and thermal processing. This p...
Article
From 2002 until 2004, archaeological excavations were conducted at the castle site of Middelburg (Belgium). A large collection of 15th- to 17th-century ceramics was uncovered, some of which originating from Italy, Spain or Portugal. This find is of particular importance for Flanders, since Mediterranean pottery is hardly recognised in an excavation...
Article
The archaeology of the Dutch War of Independence (1568–1648) in Flanders bears great potential in contributing to the European debate on early modern transformations and in raising public awareness of archaeology as a whole. Thus far, early modern features were however mostly incidentally found on multi-period sites and not as a result from specifi...
Article
The quantification of material culture can make a significant contribution to the answering of social and behavioural questions. However, especially in continental Europe, this aspect of pottery studies remains understudied. In the following article, a status quaestionis of the quantification of post-medieval ceramics in the Low Countries is given....

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Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
PhD research at Ghent University, focused on ceramics and identities during the Eighty Years' War (1568-1648) in Flanders.
Project
Over the course of the 19th and early 20th century, over 30 million Europeans would settle in Canada or the USA. The port of Antwerp functioned as one of the major hubs from which those people departed. Indeed, between 1843 and 1913 over 2.7 million people embarked on boats leaving for the New World. The Belgians amongst these migrants are cautiously estimated at 200.000. Many of them originated from the region to the north of Ghent and eventually settled in the Midwest, in the area surrounding the Great Lakes. I intend to make that very same journey. I will be leaving Ghent for research in the US. The research question that is central to this project pertains to the way in which these immigrants expressed group identities in their material, everyday lives, and how this expression of identity changed over time. These issues are evaluated on three different scales, that of material culture, architecture and landscape. In doing so, this project contributes to the broader discussion on hybridized and retained cultural practices using archaeological remains, and gives an incentive to preserve this rich, but ill-known 'Belgian' heritage.