Maxime Nicolas Brami

Maxime Nicolas Brami
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz | JGU · Institut für Organismische und Molekulare Evolutionsbiologie (iOME)

BA Bristol, MA UCL, PhD Liverpool

About

56
Publications
18,659
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193
Citations
Citations since 2017
29 Research Items
149 Citations
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Publications

Publications (56)
Article
Full-text available
This article re-examines the ‘neolithic revolution’—Gordon Childe’s great contribution to prehistoric archaeology. Childe first articulated his model of three revolutions in history—neolithic, urban and industrial—in 1936. Many authors have sought to understand it in the light of subsequent archaeological theory; here I proceed differently. A broad...
Book
Full-text available
The adoption of agriculture and settled village life is one of the most important transitions in prehistory, long viewed as one of the most essential ‘revolutions’ in human history. While traditional grand narratives of agricultural origins and dispersals still remain relevant today, decades of excavation and investigation in western Asia are incre...
Article
Full-text available
The precise genetic origins of the first Neolithic farming populations in Europe and Southwest Asia, as well as the processes and the timing of their differentiation, remain largely unknown. Demogenomic modeling of high-quality ancient genomes reveals that the early farmers of Anatolia and Europe emerged from a multiphase mixing of a Southwest Asia...
Article
Full-text available
It is now widely accepted that agriculture and settled village life arrived in Europe as a cultural package, carried by people migrating from Anatolia and the Aegean Basin. The putative fisher-forager site of Lepenski Vir in Serbia has long been acknowledged as an exception to this model. Here, the Mesolithic–Neolithic transition—possibly inspired...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents the results of a 2021 international online survey of 419 early career researchers in archaeology. Respondents were passionate about pursuing an academic career, but pessimistic about job and career prospects. Statistics highlight specific obstacles, especially for women, from unstable employment to inequitable practices, and a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Archaeology has long looked to other disciplines to generate new ideas. In recent years, the dominance of archaeology over interpretations of prehistory has been challenged by exciting new ancient DNA studies that claim to show wholesale population replacements in prehistoric Europe associated with new cultural horizons. Such broad-based interpreta...
Presentation
Full-text available
Following Childe’s dismissal from his London-based post as Research Officer for the Australian government in April 1922, he turned his back on a career in politics and returned to Archaeology. The next five years, until his appointment as Abercromby Professor of Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh, proved formative for the development not on...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Publishing our work is a major part of being an archaeologist, but the routes to publication are not always clear. There are national differences in style and preferred publication type, different sub-disciplinary norms, and language and style barriers that may seem insurmountable. Moreover, wisely planned publication strategies are often necessary...
Preprint
Today, it is widely accepted that agriculture and settled village life arrived in Europe as a cultural package, carried by people migrating from Anatolia and the Aegean Basin. The putative fisher-forager site of Lepenski Vir in Serbia has long been acknowledged as an exception to this model. Here, the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition - possibly insp...
Article
Full-text available
Interview by the Early Career Archaeologists (ECA) Community of Professor Kristian Kristiansen, the initiator and first President of the European Association of Archaeologists
Cover Page
Full-text available
The Covid-19 pandemic is exacerbating the job crisis in archaeology. Now, more than ever, ECAs need your help to navigate the job market and develop their career. Do you have experience working in archaeology? Bring your skills and knowledge and become a mentor. Together let's make a difference! Find out more: https://ecarchaeologists.com/mentoring...
Article
Full-text available
This study dwells upon a dataset of 325 rectangular and sub-rectangular buildings from ten sites in Central and Western Anatolia to offer a discussion of house size in the Neolithic and contextualize unusually large buildings in Anatolia and the Balkans. The article highlights: (1) a marked increase in residential floorspace from the 8th to the 6th...
Preprint
Full-text available
While the Neolithic expansion in Europe is well described archaeologically, the genetic origins of European first farmers and their affinities with local hunter-gatherers (HGs) remain unclear. To infer the demographic history of these populations, the genomes of 15 ancient individuals located between Western Anatolia and Southern Germany were seque...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This round table organized by the EAA "Early Research Careers in Archaeology" (ECRA) task force will explore the current challenges and opportunities facing early career researchers in archaeology, here defined as the 'precariat of archaeology'.
Article
Full-text available
The ERCA task force was set up in November 2019 with a view to make early-career researchers feel heard, empowered and supported (Brami et al. 2020). Here we explore and present personal experiences of recently-tenured archaeologists. In this first batch of interviews dedicated to Northern Europe - including Britain, Scandinavia and Northern German...
Article
Full-text available
In light of growing employment precarity for Early Career Researchers (ECRs) in archaeology, the European Association of Archaeologists has formed the “Early Research Careers in Archaeology” (ERCA) Task Force. ECRs are defined here as pre-tenured researchers, including postgraduates, postdocs and non-salaried scientists who plan to stay in academia...
Chapter
Full-text available
The spread of farming in Europe is usually thought of as a straightforward case of diffusion from a centre, or centres, of domestication in southwest Asia, to a periphery in which resources were simply not available for agriculture to develop independently. While this narrative still holds true, broadly speaking – for instance, there is a definite...
Conference Paper
Vere Gordon Childe (1892-1957) is widely credited for laying the foundations of European prehistory. More a political activist than a prehistorian at the beginning of his career, Childe started off as a man without affiliation, an Australian in Europe, in search of this once barbarous continent. Although he conducted excavations at Skara Brae and e...
Conference Paper
This paper focuses on intellectual interactions among London-based researchers through the 1910s to the 1930s who engaged in debates on the origins of early culture, and aims to clarify the implications of the diffusion controversy for the wider academic split between archaeology and anthropology. The question of whether early culture spread like an...
Presentation
Full-text available
If the 18th century was the century of the rediscovery of man, in all his varieties, through voyages of exploration and Enlightenment ideas, the 19th century was undoubtedly the century of the rediscovery of Europe, of its deep past and its barbarian roots. A new scientific era, ushered in by Uniformitarianism and Darwin’s theory of Evolution, brou...
Book
Full-text available
How did farming spread into Europe, from its origins in the Near East? And what remained of the original Neolithic, once it spread beyond its initial boundaries, to Western Anatolia, Greece and the Balkans? This book looks at the content of the Neolithic pattern of existence that spread into Europe 8,500 years ago, and specifically at practices, de...
Conference Paper
Myres was many things: an archaeologist, classicist, geographer and anthropologist. He was the patron of Gordon Childe at the RAI, and was active in the debates surrounding Elliot Smith and diffusionism. In his now neglected work Who were the Greeks? he draws together his remarkable erudition to attempt what today might be regarded as an anti-essen...
Conference Paper
Archaeologists have long assumed that, as soon as sedentary farming was invented, c. 10,000 years ago in the Near East, it slowly expanded across Europe like an epidemic. Recent archaeological and demographic models highlight a more dynamic process in fits and starts, involving phases of rapid expansion over vast landscapes, typically spanning mult...
Research
Full-text available
As evidence accumulates that Neolithic expansion in Eurasia involved standstills, punctuated by rapid advances, this workshop will explore the hypothesis that the apparent lag in Neolithic occupation between Central and Western Anatolia reflected an actual frontier, where farming expansion was halted. Radiometric measurements indicate that the adve...
Article
Full-text available
A Neolithic structure was rebuilt three times at Çukuriçi Höyük, on the central Anatolian Aegean coast, despite its unfavourable location on unsettled fill. We draw upon this seemingly incongruous case to make inference about the siting of buildings in Neolithic times. Through detailed cross-comparison with other sequences of vertically superimpose...
Article
Full-text available
Using the space-time distribution of 1162 uniformly recalibrated dates from 71 sites in Asia Minor, the Aegean Basin, Southern Thrace and Macedonia, this article presents geostatistical (kriging) and graphical simulations of the Neolithic expansion out of Anatolia. How fast was the advance of the agricultural pioneer front? Did it proceed in a sing...
Conference Paper
The westward spread of agriculture into and across Europe has traditionally been described as a continuous process, involving a single wave of farmers advancing at a steady pace of 1 km/year on average (Ammerman/Cavalli-Sforza 1971). This view is at odds with regional studies, which show major discontinuities or lags in the uptake of agriculture in...
Conference Paper
Neolithic houses in Anatolia and the Southern Balkans show a marked increase in residential floor space from the late 7th to the early 6th millennium BC cal. A tendency to scale up the house, without actually increasing the number of rooms, provides a common backdrop to the Neolithic in both regions. Houses revolved around one central room, which p...
Conference Paper
Current research indicates that the Neolithic pattern of existence spread into Europe in the 7th millennium BC cal. Owing to our general inability to pinpoint the origins of Europe’s first farmers and/or domesticates, however, we are confronted with a grand puzzle, made of both widespread and superficial similarities between European and Anatolian...
Article
Full-text available
Following the assumption that the Neolithic witnessed the first widespread appearance of permanent houses and households, in line with the adoption of sedentism, this article examines the relevance of residential and construction practices to our understanding of the process of Neolithic expansion from Anatolia to the Balkans. Three practices, with...
Conference Paper
Beyond farming practices, the Neolithic witnessed the inception of a new set of residential and construction practices, pertaining to the ways in which houses were built, lived in and discarded at the end of their use-lives. These practices provide useful markers to trace the spread of Neolithic innovations in Anatolia and the Balkans. For understa...
Conference Paper
I propose to use some of the traditional markers of the Neolithic, as defined by Vere Gordon Childe (1936) and others, to characterise the Neolithic in two regions of Anatolia: food-production, settled village life, ground stone tools, pottery and weaving implements. Attention is drawn to the contrast between a developmental Neolithic in Central An...
Article
Full-text available
The current distribution of radiocarbon dates for the Neolithic in the Anatolian peninsula indicates a significant time lag, of up to 2,000 calibrated years at two standard deviations, between the start of Neolithic occupation on the central Anatolian plateau and in the Aegean basin. This chronological discrepancy appears to match that existing bet...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Vere Gordon Childe, a founding father of modern archaeology, defined the Neolithic 'revolution' as the shift from food- gathering to food-producing. Central to this theory is the spatial division between hunters-and-gatherers, who live at the expense of nature, and farmers-and-herders, who produce their own means of subsistence. This seminar attemp...
Article
Full-text available
Over half a century ago, James Mellaart, the then assistant director of the British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara, conducted excavation at Hacılar, in the Southwest Anatolian Lake District. Alongside Çatalhöyük, Hacılar played a pivotal role in the development of Neolithic archaeology in Turkey. Yet, despite its significance for the discipline...
Data
Also available under the 'supplementary material' tab at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12520-014-0193-4
Data
Also available under the 'supplementary material' tab at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12520-014-0193-4
Conference Paper
‘Diffusion’ has undertones of colonial prejudices attached to it. Consequently, the word is barely used in English-speaking literature nowadays, even though ‘diffusion’ and the eponymous tradition of ‘diffusionism’ used to dominate the field of social sciences at the time of Gordon Childe and Elliot Smith (c. 1920s). Specialists of the Neolithic pe...
Article
Full-text available
Recent discoveries in Western Anatolia have shed new light on the origins of Europe's first farmers. Fifty years ago, James Mellaart suggested that Early Neolithic communities in Greece and the Balkans shared a common ancestry in Western Anatolia at the site of Hacilar. Current excavations conducted along the Aegean coast of Turkey and in the broad...
Conference Paper
Practice theory has brought major changes to the study of tradition in archaeology by shifting the focus of analysis from culture traits and ‘similarities’ to patterns of social ‘behaviour’ internalized through everyday life action. Archaeologists wishing to apply practice theory to prehistoric research face, however, several difficulties. Since ar...
Conference Paper
Archaeology provides the opportunity to study major shifts in human history. One such shift is the so-called ‘agricultural revolution’ or neolithization, characterized in fact by two distinct sets of processes: the development of farming and herding practices in several centres of the Near and Middle East, and the subsequent introduction of these p...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
We are a community of young professionals, postgraduates and postdocs, from the academic, heritage and commercial sectors, collaborating to support each other and make sure that no-one is left behind. Pursuing a career in archaeology can sometimes feel hopeless and isolating. No matter how hard you work, early career archaeologists face daunting obstacles spurred by economy-wide trends like casualisation and erosion of labour rights. Archaeologists are increasingly confronted with long working hours, job insecurity, imposed mobility, and poor long-term career prospects, as well as ongoing gender and racial discrimination and pay-gaps. Maintaining a healthy work-life balance, especially when juggling commitments like family and children, can be difficult in the face of an over-saturated job market that enforces high performance through disposability. If you are an early career archaeologist who has felt the effects of these systemic issues on your career and wellbeing, or if you are concerned about the direction of the discipline and the wellbeing of your colleagues, then this community is for you. If you feel over-worked, under-paid and under-recognised, we are here to help. Join us and make an impact! Find out more about our activities by visiting our website: https://ecarchaeologists.com/
Project
The impact of ancient DNA in archaeology is seismic, arguably as significant as the introduction of radiocarbon dating in the 1950s. It is already forcing us to reconsider narratives which are essential not only to archaeology but also to anthropology and geography. For the first time, we have access to reliable means of inferring migration directly from the DNA of the long-deceased organisms that we dig up. Migration and substantial ‘population replacement’ has now been implicated in a large number of prehistoric shifts in material culture, including the spread of farming technology in various places around the world, and the third millennium BC ‘massive migrations’ from the Eurasian steppes. Ancient DNA has also transformed our understanding of the relationships and interactions between modern humans and archaic hominins. Ancient DNA is not only transforming archaeology, but also the very nature of our understanding of human origins, identity and what it means to be human. In an era where millions of people across the world routinely take DNA tests to find out more about their ancestry, it is worth considering the implications of the ancient DNA ‘revolution’ for the writing and understanding of history. Have humans always been on the move? What can biological history contribute to our understanding of culture and ancient societies?
Project
The Neolithic ‘revolution’ is widely held to have reached a tipping point at the end of the Younger Dryas, c. 9,600 cal. BC, within the so-called ‘Fertile Crescent’ of Southwest Asia. While expansion from this core is projected to have happened at different times in different parts of the Near East, the main expansion of the Neolithic outside the Near East appears to have been delayed until the end of the PPNB, in the 7th millennium BC cal., that is, thousands of years after sedentism and agriculture were first invented there. This project considers how aspects of the Neolithic pattern of existence became portable and spread beyond its initial boundaries in the Near East, to reach Anatolia and Europe.