Max Marschall

Max Marschall
Aurecon Group

Diplom

About

12
Publications
5,514
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28
Citations
Introduction
Max Marschall currently works at the Spatial Information Architecture Laboratory (SIAL), RMIT University. Max does research in Computational Design. Their most recent publication is 'Alternative means of navigating parameter spaces'.

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
This paper introduces a database of 34 field-measured building occupant behavior datasets collected from 15 countries and 39 institutions across 10 climatic zones covering various building types in both commercial and residential sectors. This is a comprehensive global database about building occupant behavior. The database includes occupancy patte...
Article
Full-text available
We conducted a field study at a K-12 private school in the suburbs of Melbourne, Australia. The data capture contained two elements: First, a 5-month longitudinal field study In-Gauge using two outdoor weather stations, as well as indoor weather stations in 17 classrooms and temperature sensors on the vents of occupant-controlled room air-condition...
Preprint
Full-text available
We conducted a field study at a K-12 private school in the suburbs of Melbourne, Australia. The data capture contained two elements: First, a 5-month longitudinal field study In-Gauge using two outdoor weather stations, as well as indoor weather stations in 17 classrooms and temperature sensors on the vents of occupant-controlled room air-condition...
Thesis
Full-text available
In this thesis I argue for the need to consider the effects of occupant behaviour on the environmental sustainability of buildings, and propose and test novel methods to incorporate this behaviour in building performance simulations during the architectural design process. Due to rising energy prices and the increasing adverse effects of carbon em...
Chapter
Full-text available
Air-conditioning is a major factor in energy consumption worldwide. Populous developing countries located in the tropics are projected to soon experience a staggering increase in the use of such systems, suggesting a future need for architects to design buildings that exploit natural means of temperature regulation. In this paper, we present a nove...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Data capture and analysis are transforming entire industries, enabling novel solutions developed from a numeric evaluation of real-world phenomena. This generally relies on gathering data on physical conditions and users to create accurate, predictive models and provide customized solutions. Increasingly, data-driven approaches are also becoming a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Using natural ventilation instead of mechanical building systems to regulate indoor climate can reduce energy consumption while increasing human well-being. The feasibility of natural ventilation depends on outdoor climate conditions as well as the physical and architectural properties of a building. Based on the observation that institutional buil...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Thermal comfort research has shown that natural ventilation can reduce energy consumption while increasing comfort. However, giving occupants control over their environment introduces uncertainty into building performance which is challenging to emulate using current simulation techniques. Traditionally, window operation is modelled deterministical...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper responds to the growing desire to systematically gather environmental feedback in cities through the deployment of networks of connected sensors which collect and transmit data, to register change, uncover trends and diagnose potential environmental threats. However, we recognise the novelty of such information gathered and its perceivab...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Virtual Reality (VR) has the potential to revolutionize the representation of digital design models. The highly immersive exploration of design variations in VR is a particularly powerful tool to improve decision-making processes, especially when architecture deviates from ordinary forms. This is the case in stadia design where geometric interdepen...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Generative design processes are characterized by modifications of a design model's parameters with the aim of improving its quality. The entirety of possible parameter combinations in a given design scenario is referred to as parameter space, in which each parameter represents a dimension. The efficacy of a design process could be measured by the q...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As part of a joint research project between the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) and te Department for Structural Design and Technology (KET), a one week student workshop was organised at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts (KADK) in Copenhagen. This paper outlines the teaching methods applied to reach maximum insight fro...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
For air-conditioned buildings, the Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) model calculates a comfort score ranging from -3 (cold) to 0 (neutral) to 3 (hot).
For naturally ventilated buildings, the adaptive thermal comfort model (ATC) model calculates an indoor design temperature, around which a range is defined as comfortable for 80% (or 90%) of people.
Is there a way to compare these two different comfort metrics?
For example, if I simulate a space to be air-conditioned and determine a PMV of 1.5 at a given time, then I simulate the same space to be naturally ventilated and determine the indoor temperature to be 4K over the design temperature - in which scenario is the occupant more comfortable?
Asked another way: when using the ATC model, can I use the difference between the indoor temperature and the design temperature to determine a comfort score based on the same 7 point scale as the PMV model, in order to enable a direct comparison?
Kind regards,
Max
Question
As I understand, adaptive thermal comfort is calculated as a function of prevailing outdoor temperature. Inputting this value returns a fairly large comfort range, based on the fact that occupants can take adaptive measures (clothing change, opening windows, etc.).
I am currently testing natural ventilation simulations, to explore how building design can affect comfort. Air speed in a building is an important factor - two naturally ventilated buildings in the same location but different air speeds will be perceived differently.
Is there a way to make this explicit? I.e., is there a formula that adds wind speed as a parameter to the adaptive thermal comfort model, or is there a different model for this altogether?

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