Mauro Rizzetto

Mauro Rizzetto
The American School of Classical Studies at Athens

Doctor of Philosophy

About

28
Publications
6,810
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40
Citations
Citations since 2017
23 Research Items
38 Citations
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Introduction
I am a PhD student at the University of Sheffield, Department of Archaeology. My research focuses in zooarchaeology. For my PhD project, I am investigating changes in animal husbandry during the late Roman - early medieval transition in Britain and the lower Rhineland.

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
This study contributes to reconstruct the socio-economic dynamics of change at the Roman-Early Anglo-Saxon transition in Britain through zooarchaeological analysis. Contemporary assemblages from the nearby European mainland are used to provide a term of comparison. The results indicate that typical Roman husbandry practices survived into fourth cen...
Poster
Full-text available
Understanding Zooarchaeology is a short course series run by the Zooarchaeology Team at the University of Sheffield. The courses are ideal for beginners and professionals alike and aim to provide a fundamental understanding of faunal remains as well as zooarchaeological practices. Classes are highly practical and take place in a friendly and relaxe...
Poster
Full-text available
The Understanding Zooarchaeology II short course uses short lectures, discussions, case-studies and practical classes so that participants can experience the whole range of knowledge and skills required by the discipline, with the opportunity to work with an actual faunal assemblage. The course is directed to students, professionals and enthusiasts...
Poster
Full-text available
Understanding Zooarchaeology is a short course series run by the Zooarchaeology Team at the University of Sheffield. The courses are ideal for beginners and professionals alike and aim to provide a fundamental understanding of faunal remains as well as zooarchaeological practices. Classes are highly practical and take place in a friendly and relaxe...
Poster
Full-text available
The Understanding Zooarchaeology I short course uses short lectures, discussions, case-studies and practical classes to provide an insight into the theory and methods that can be used to understand animal remains in archaeology. The course is directed to students, professionals and enthusiasts and does not require any previous knowledge. The teachi...
Article
Full-text available
This paper focusses on the bird remains from West Stow, a renowned Early Anglo-Saxon site in southeast Britain. The evidence provided by the frequency of species, ageing, sexing, and biometrical analyses has been integrated to investigate changes and continuities in the exploitation of domestic and wild birds at the settlement. Domestic birds domin...
Poster
Full-text available
Zooarchaeology short course at the University of sheffield
Poster
Full-text available
Zooarchaeology short course at the University of Sheffield
Poster
The Understanding Zooarchaeology I short course uses short lectures, discussions, case-studies and practical classes to provide an insight into the theory and methods that can be used to understand animal remains in archaeology. The course is directed to students, professionals and enthusiasts and does not require any previous knowledge. The teachi...
Poster
The Understanding Zooarchaeology II short course uses short lectures, discussions, case-studies and practical classes so that participants can experience the whole range of knowledge and skills required by the discipline, with the opportunity to work with an actual faunal assemblage. The course is directed to students, professionals and enthusiasts...
Poster
Full-text available
The distinctive character of Roman husbandry practices in north-west Europe has long been acknowledged. Despite some limited regional differences, husbandry focussed on cattle, that were intensively exploited in agricultural works; the main aim was the production of an agricultural surplus, that fuelled the taxation cycle imposed by the Roman state...
Poster
Full-text available
This paper focusses on the bird remains from West Stow, a renowned Early Anglo-Saxon site in southeast Britain. Zooarchaeological analyses include species frequencies, evidence for carcass processing, and biometry. Ageing and analysis of the medullary bone for sexing apply to chicken remains. Material from the four Early Anglo-Saxon subphases are a...
Presentation
The MARS series is organised by the Medieval & Ancient Research Centre at the University of Sheffield (MARCUS) and presents the results of research conducted on the ancient and medieval worlds within the Faculty of Arts and Humanities.
Poster
Full-text available
The faunal assemblage from early Anglo-Saxon West Stow (SE Britain) produced a large number of caprine mandibles. Tooth and bone diagnostic morphological and biometrical criteria for sheep-goat distinction suggest all caprine remains at the site belonged to sheep. This provided the opportunity to construct new mandibular wear stage estimation table...
Conference Paper
The collapse of the Roman world-system in the 5th century AD implied major political, socio-cultural, and economic changes in the territories of the former Empire and beyond. Animal remains are very well-placed to inform on such developments, due to the importance of specialised food production and distribution practices within the Roman Empire, an...
Conference Paper
Teamwork-based zooarchaeology teaching and outreach events represent an invaluable source of communication among academic researchers and towards the public audience. In the last decade, the zooarchaeology team from the Department of Archaeology in Sheffield (United Kingdom) has always been proactive in participating to several outreach events and...
Conference Paper
The management of animal resources for food production is highly affected by a range of economic and socio-cultural variables. This contribution analyses food production and consumption at the two Roman sites of Pakenham and Icklingham, and at the Early Anglo-Saxon site of West Stow. Differences in animal exploitation highlighted at the three sites...
Poster
Full-text available
The Roman conquest of Britain caused major economic and cultural changes that affected Iron Age societies throughout the island. Patterns of change are visible already in the pre-Roman late Iron Age, when influences from the Continent started spreading to southern Britain. During the Roman period, the chronology, nature and extent of change were de...
Article
Full-text available
This article reviews aspects of the development of animal husbandry in Roman Britain, focusing in particular on the Iron Age/Roman and Roman/early medieval transitions. By analysing the two chronological extremes of the period of Roman influence in Britain we try to identify the core characteristics of Romano-British husbandry by using case studies...
Chapter
Full-text available
This methodological glossary presents brief explanations of the main analytical methods employed by zooarchaeologists and makes reference to those chapters in the Handbook that provide examples of their applications. The aim is to provide non-expert readers with a basic understanding of how the evidence presented in this volume has been obtained. T...
Book
This book presents a survey of world archaeology, from the point of view of animal remain studies. It can be considered as a showcase for world zooarchaeology. Forty-eight chapters written by researchers from twenty-five countries discuss archaeological investigations in five different continents. The geographic range covers the Arctic as well as t...
Conference Paper
Roman husbandry practices impacted considerably on the way domestic animals were managed in the various provinces of the Empire. On many British sites dated to this period, there is increasing evidence for a specialisation of animal exploitation. In particular, cattle were intensively exploited for traction and meat production. Increased animal mob...
Poster
Full-text available
The sea separating Britain from mainland Europe has often been seen as a physical barrier to past communities, restricting the mobility of people and goods. At the same time, however, it represented a trade route and an actual link between the island and the Continent. In Roman times, this becomes clear in many respects, cultural, economic and soci...
Poster
Full-text available
The zooarchaeological analyses of a faunal assemblage from Castleford, a Roman military and civilian site in West Yorkshire, are presented and discussed. The fort was in use in the late 1st century AD; a small settlement developed next to the fort and survived into the 4th century. The assemblage here analysed was recovered from the vicus. The prev...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
This project aims to contribute to academic research on archaeological cervid remains, by providing a tool to separate red deer, fallow deer, and roe deer bones. The method relies on the collection of biometrical data from modern specimens of known species (and, where possible, sex and age), to identify size and shape indices which can better separate red deer from fallow deer values, and fallow deer from roe deer values; in turn, values from archaeological cervid remains can be plotted to attempt identification. The measurements chosen will include standard ones as well as new measurements created to translate biometrically morphological diagnostic features identified by previous studies (Di Stefano 1995; Lister 1996). Preliminary analyses of the data so far collected from the Sheffield and Historic England zooarchaeology reference collections provided promising results. An important advantage is represented by the combination of size and shape indices analyses. Red deer is larger than fallow deer, and this latter is larger than roe deer. The body size of these two species changed through time according to a range of environmental and anthropogenic variables, and nowadays substantial geographical size differences persist throughout Europe. Size overlaps are enhanced by sexual dimorphism. For these reasons, size alone cannot be used to separate red deer from fallow deer remains; however, it can be used to enhance the separation provided by shape indices. The development of a biometrical method to separate red deer, fallow deer, and roe deer remains would rely on more objective separation criteria than morphological approaches; the method would also produce graphs which can be directly scrutinised to assess the validity of separation. Alternative identification methods, such as aDNA analyses, can be very effective but are constrained by severe cost limitations and are destructive; ZooMS provides a cheaper alternative, but the peptide mass fingerprints of these species are too similar to attempt separation. Further advantages provided by a biometrical approach, therefore, are ultimately reflected by the low-tech nature of the method, which makes it easy to apply in any circumstances and extremely accessible and inclusive.
Project
Publication of the proceedings of the 7th PZAF as a British Archaeological Report (BAR) International Series volume.
Project
Assessment of animal husbandry of equids after the end of the Roman occupation with special interest on biometrical changes