Mauro Carolli

Mauro Carolli
SINTEF | Stiftelsen for industriell og teknisk forskning · Energy Systems

PhD

About

39
Publications
11,843
Reads
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862
Citations
Citations since 2016
17 Research Items
700 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Introduction
Mauro Carolli currently works at SINTEF Energi in Trondheim, Norway. He worked formerly at Dept. Ecosystem Research at the IGB Leibniz-Institute für Gewässerökologie und Binnenfischerei in Berlin and at the Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanic Engineering at the University of Trento, Italy. Mauro does research in Ecosystem services, Water Science, Ecological Engineering and Limnology.
Additional affiliations
May 2015 - present
Università degli Studi di Trento
Position
  • Researcher
September 2008 - December 2010
Fondazione Edmund Mach - Istituto Agrario San Michele All'Adige
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (39)
Article
An increase in the demand for renewable energy is driving hydropower development and its integration with variable renewable energy sources. When hydropower is produced flexibly from hydropower plants, it causes rapid and frequent artificial flow fluctuations in rivers, a phenomenon known as hydropeaking. Hydropeaking and associated hydrological al...
Chapter
This chapter provides a holistic overview of the science and management of rapid artificial flow fluctuations caused by peak-operating hydropower. Using a process-based framework, this chapter illustrates the links between hydropeaking drivers and associated pressures on river ecosystem structure, function and integrity, and summarizes the role and...
Chapter
River ecosystem services (rESS) such as the provision of drinking water, fish and other foods, flood protection, or spaces for recreation are important to human well-being. We present methods, tools, and resources for measuring, mapping, assessing, and reporting on status and trends in rESS. Within this framing, we show current approaches to integr...
Presentation
Full-text available
Hydropeaking research has generated unprecedented scientific discussion in the last twenty years and improved our understanding of the processes resulting from hydropeaking by strengthening the links between basic knowledge and practical applications. Given the reportedly increase in hydropeaking operations and applications in recent years, this Sp...
Article
Full-text available
The water footprint has developed into a widely-used concept to examine water use and resulting local impacts caused during agricultural and industrial production. Building on recent advancements in the water footprint concept, it can be an effective steering instrument to support, inter alia, achieving sustainable development goals (SDGs) - SDG 6...
Article
Full-text available
As the demand for hydroelectricity progresses worldwide, small hydropower operators are increasingly examining the feasibility of using existing infrastructure (e.g., settling basins) in run-of-the-river schemes for intermittent power production. Such flexible production causes short-term discharge fluctuations (hydropeaking) in downstream reaches...
Article
Full-text available
Rivers support some of Earth’s richest biodiversity1 and provide essential ecosystem services to society2, but they are often fragmented by barriers to free flow3. In Europe, attempts to quantify river connectivity have been hampered by the absence of a harmonized barrier database. Here we show that there are at least 1.2 million instream barriers...
Article
Full-text available
We discuss the prioritization of river reaches to be selected for restoration measures under the constraints of financial resource limitation. We propose and apply a simple approach based on the quantification of major hydro-morphological alterations and the critical comparison with locally proposed restoration actions. The available hydro-morpholo...
Presentation
Balkan rivers, which harbour high aquatic biodiversity, face a boom of hydropower dam construction. We reviewed the distribution and trends of hydropower plants (HPPs) in Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Bulgaria and Montenegro. Furthermore, we analysed flow regime alterations induced by various types of HPPs (run-of-the-river, st...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In recent times, habitat models at the meso-scale have become widely accepted techniques to quantify the impact of hydro-morphological pressures on rivers. However, several limitations limit a broader applicability of such models: 1) field-based mesohabitat mapping is difficult in large non-wadable streams; 2) obtaining a reliable habitat-streamflo...
Conference Paper
Alpine rivers and river corridors provide a number of important ecosystem services. Thereby hydromorphological processes and functions have a pivotal role in shaping and maintain river habitats and their ecological functions, which then provide various services to the society. The availability of these services has been historically greatly modifie...
Article
Abstract The provision of important river ecosystem services (ES) is dependent on the flow regime. This requires methods to assess the impacts on ES caused by interventions on rivers that affect flow regime, such as water abstractions. This study proposes a method to i) quantify the provision of a set of river ES, ii) simulate the effects of water...
Article
Full-text available
The Italian Alps feed a large number of reservoirs for hydropower production, which are losing storage capacity due to natural inflow of sediment of different origin (alluvial, glacial). Local government and local environmental agencies authorize periodical sediment flushes with a mandatory release regime when such measure is technically feasible....
Article
Abstract Cultural and recreational river ecosystem services and their relations with the flow regime are still poorly investigated. We develop a modelling-based approach to assess recreational flow requirements and the spatially distributed river suitability for white-water rafting, a typical service offered by mountain streams, with potential conf...
Article
Drift time and distance depend on the ability of the drifting invertebrates to alter their body posture or by swimming, and these behaviors may change according to the local hydraulic environment, resulting in different distances travelled before exiting the drift. Such drift and settlement mediated invertebrate movement determine dispersal process...
Article
The thermal regime of rivers is threatened by anthropogenic stresses at a large variety of time scales. We focus on sub-daily thermal alterations induced by the release of hypolimnetic water for hydropower production (thermopeaking). We analyse the thermal signal focusing on the following characteristics that are potentially affected by hypolimneti...
Article
Release of water from storage hydropower plants generates rapid flow and stage fluctuations (hydropeaking) in the receiving water bodies at a variety of sub-daily time-scales. In this paper we present an approach to quantify such variations, which is easy to apply, requires stream flow data at a readily available resolution, and allows for the comp...
Article
Sudden instream releases of hypolimnetic water from hydropower plants [i.e. hydropeaking (HP)] can cause abrupt temperature variations [i.e. thermopeaking (TP)], typically on a daily basis. The propagation of discharge and thermal waves is asynchronous, causing the benthic community to undergo two different but consecutive impacts. Invertebrates re...
Conference Paper
Hydropeaking induced by storage hydropower plants can modify the natural flow regime at different time scales, with severe impacts on the biodiversity of the downstream river ecosystems. In this research, a case study on the Noce River (NE Italy) is presented, where habitat simulation models and habitat time series were used to compare restoration...
Article
Sudden instream releases of hypolimnetic water from hydropower plants (i.e. hydropeaking) can cause abrupt temperature variations (i.e. thermopeaking), typically on a daily basis. We investigated the thermopeaking effects on benthic invertebrate drift by simulating abrupt thermal shifts in experimental flumes. We conducted two cold thermopeaking an...
Article
Full-text available
Pesticide loads in streams are potentially one of the most relevant stressors for macroinvertebrate communities. Nevertheless, real effects provoked at the community level are still largely unknown. Model ecosystems are frequently used as tools for the risk assessment of pesticides, especially for their regulation, however, they can be also applied...
Article
Full-text available
Four perennial rheocrene springs located between 919 and 1252 m a.s.l. on substrata characterized by different lithologies were studied. Water samples and invertebrates were collected seasonally for one year. The crenic fauna was collected using three sampling techniques: moss washing, drift tubes and benthic traps. Each sampling technique was part...
Article
Full-text available
Within the CRENODAT project (Biodiversity assessment and integrity evaluation of springs of Trentino -Italian Alps -and long-term ecological research, 2004-2008) we studied a total of 90 springs in Trentino (south-eastern Alps, Italy), 75 of which were used for statistical analysis. The springs were grouped into seven different types and represente...
Article
The impact of a single hydropeaking event was studied in the Alpine stream Noce Bianco. Four stations were selected, one upstream and three, respectively, at 0.25, 6, and 8km downstream from a hydropower plant. We collected drifting invertebrates during a planned water release that increased the discharge 7-fold. At the onset of the hydropeaking wa...
Article
In Alpine areas, the temporal patterns of hydropower plants operations can have consequences for the water bodies which receive downstream releases in the form of "hydropeaking", typically consisting in sharp releases of turbinated water in the river reaches below dams. Hydropeaking may significantly affect also the thermal regime of rivers: typica...
Article
The impact of repeated hydropeaking events was assessed in the Alpine stream Noce Bianco (Trentino, NE Italy). Three stations were selected, one upstream and two at 0.25 km and 6 km downstream from a hydropower plant which causes 7-fold discharge increases. We collected hyporheic invertebrates for two years. Taxa diversity and abundance were reduce...
Article
Full-text available
Results and discussion Degree–days were not significantly different between NB19 and NB20, while they were it for NB8 and V1 (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.001). A significant difference in annual water temperature was observed between NB19 and NB20 (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.001). Fig. 2 shows the differences in water temperature recorded up and downstr...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Hydropeaking research has generated unprecedented scientific discussion in the last twenty years and improved our understanding of the processes resulting from hydropeaking by strengthening the links between basic knowledge and practical applications. Given the reportedly increase in hydropeaking operations and applications in recent years, this Special Issue aims to explore the most up-to-date innovations in hydropeaking with a focus on approaches leading to quantify processes. All disciplines working in hydropeaking-related issues will be considered, from hydrology, hydraulics, fluvial geomorphology, freshwater and terrestrial ecology, landscape planning to social sciences, economics, and market drivers. Interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches and perspectives will be particularly welcome. Abstract submission deadline (via direct email to guest editors): May 1st, 2021 Abstract acceptance notification: May 15th, 2021 Full paper submission deadline: November 30th, 2021 (Early submissions are encouraged) Tentative date for SI online publication*: January 31st, 2022 *please note that individual papers will be given a DOI and published online as soon as they are accepted. More details can be found here: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/page/journal/15351467/homepage/call-for-papers-innovations-in-hydropeaking-research
Project
To stimulate integrative hydropeaking research across disciplines to support: i. Assessment of hydropeaking impacts on various spatial and temporal scales, ii. Improvement of mitigation measures, iii. Optimization of hydropower operation sustainability, iv. Promotion of environmentally-friendly approaches to hydropeaking. The creation of HyPeak is motivated by the clear necessity to integrate interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary knowledge to address the complex challenges related to hydropeaking in the context of a changing world, with increasing flexible energy demand, globally. Our vision is to bring together a reference group of experts to support evidence-based legislation at different levels (national to international) and enhance the value of the interaction between hydropeaking research and policy.