Maurício Shimabukuro

Maurício Shimabukuro
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG) | FURG · Institute of Oceanography - IO

PhD

About

33
Publications
8,265
Reads
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245
Citations
Citations since 2017
26 Research Items
241 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
Introduction
I'm a benthic ecologist focusing in deep-sea diversity. I like using traditional and molecular tools to understand species diversity and distribution. My main expertise in morphological characterization is with annelids and free-living nematodes, but I'm also interested in molluscs and peracarid crustaceans.
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - June 2022
University of Southern Denmark
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2019 - July 2020
Institut Français de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Discovering the fauna of the Atacama and Kermadec trenches (STAR) project
January 2014 - July 2018
University of São Paulo
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Biodiversity and conectivity of benthic communities in organic substrates (whalebones and woods) in the deep Southwest Atlantic
Education
January 2014 - July 2018
Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo
Field of study
  • Diversity of annelids in organic substrates in the deep Southwest Atlantic Ocean
July 2008 - April 2011
University of São Paulo
Field of study
  • Polychaete assemblages on the continental shelf adjacent to Santos, SP: composition, distribution and trophic structure
January 2003 - December 2006

Publications

Publications (33)
Article
Two new species of Rubyspira and one of Cordesia (Gastropoda: Abyssochrysoidea) are described morphologically and genetically, based on specimens collected from whale bones and wood parcels artificially implanted in the deep southwest Atlantic Ocean, at c. 1500 and 3300 m depths. Rubyspira pescaprae sp. nov. and R. elongata sp. nov. occur preferent...
Presentation
Full-text available
Marine meiofauna comprises microscopic animals that inhabit sediment´s particles. The most abundant meiofaunal taxa (50-90% of the whole meiofaunal community) is the phylum Nematoda. Despite the high abundance and importance, knowledge about nematodes inhabiting the deep-sea ecosystem is very limited. Thus, the aim of this study is to analyze and c...
Article
Whale falls are considered important habitats contributing to biodiversity, evolutionary novelty and connectivity of deep-sea environments. The organic input of a whale carcass increases the community standing stock and changes the species composition in comparison with the surrounding benthic infauna. However, endofauna living inside the bone matr...
Article
Full-text available
Hadal trenches are depocenters for organic material, and host intensified benthic microbial activity. The enhanced deposition is presumed to be reflected in elevated meiofaunal standing-stock, but available studies are ambiguous. Here, we investigate the distribution of meiofauna along the Atacama Trench axis and adjacent abyssal and bathyal settin...
Article
Full-text available
Deep-sea trenches are one of the last frontiers for deep-sea exploration and represent a large reservoir of undiscovered biodiversity. This applies in particular to organisms belonging to smaller-size classes, such as meiofauna. Among different meiofauna taxa, kinorhynchs represent a large gap in our knowledge about global marine biodiversity in ge...
Article
Full-text available
In the original article, the Zoobank registration is missing for all the new species proposed. Here we included the Zoobank registration followed by the nomenclatural acts (species description) in accordance with Article 8.5.3 (ICZN, 1999) in order for the names to be valid. All figures and remarks can be found in the original article, but the new...
Article
Pockmarks are crater-like depressions in seabed sediments commonly found along continental margins and generally associated with episodic fluid seepage. In this study, we describe a new species of Chloeia (Amphinomidae) gathered from a pockmark field, located off the southeastern Brazilian continental margin (∼750 m depth), SW Atlantic. The complet...
Chapter
Chemosynthetic ecosystems are fueled by reduced compounds (CH4 and/or H2S), which are important for the chemosynthetic production by microbiota. They comprise hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, and large organic “islands” or patches, such as whale skeletons and wood falls. Despite common along a large range of geological settings around the world, che...
Article
Specialist fauna populations from chemosynthetic ecosystems are connected through larval stages travelling in current highways in the vast deep sea. One shrimp family of such specialists, Alvinocarididae, is hitherto known to be endemic to vents and seeps with no reported occurrence in ephemeral organic-rich chemosynthetic habitats. Here we report...
Thesis
The Atacama Trench, located at ~ 8065 m depth, is an eutrophic system and is considered a meiofauna hotspot. Nematode phylum, also known as roundworms, dominate these meiofaunal assemblages. Although this phylum is the most common, and is important in the functioning of deep-sea ecosystems, it is largely understudied. Thus, the objective of my inte...
Article
Full-text available
Whale falls are important environments contributing to biodiversity, connectivity and evolutionary novelty in deep-sea ecosystem. Notwithstanding, most of this knowledge is based in studies from NE Pacific basin. Interestingly, the only known natural whale fall on the SW Atlantic has faunal composition affinities with carcasses from other deep-ocea...
Article
Full-text available
Bone-eating Osedax worms can quickly colonize exposed bones and are important ecosystem engineers in whale fall communities, contributing to cause of bone degradation. This study shows that the deep SW Atlantic margin harbors many Osedax species. Using DNA barcoding, we found four putative new lineages as well as O. frankpressi Rouse, Goffredi, and...
Presentation
Hadal regions are the deepest areas of the ocean (>6,000m depth). Particulate organic matter (POM) derived from the primary surface production is the main food supply for the hadal zone, although carrion falls and localized chemosynthetic production also provide resources for some hadal communities. POM flux to the trench floor varies in space and...
Article
Full-text available
Fazendas de mexilhões oferecem abrigo e alimentação para uma grande variedade de organismos tornando-se um ambiente favorável para o estabelecimento de populações biológicas. Todavia a presença destes organismos no cultivo gera consequências ecológicas e zootécnicas, positivas ou negativas. Nesse estudo foi realizada a caracterização da fauna vágil...
Article
Full-text available
Wood falls provide locally and temporally restricted inputs of organic material to the deep sea supporting heterotrophic and chemotrophic fauna. These habitats also play a significant role in the diversity, abundance, and evolution of deep-sea macrofauna. Despite the importance of wood falls to the global deep-sea biodiversity, there is a large gap...
Article
Full-text available
The trophic structure and role of chemosynthesis remain unexplored in deep-sea whale-fall communities in areas other than the California margin. This gap limits understanding of these communities and their ecological relationships with other chemosynthetic ecosystems, such as vents and seeps. Here, we study 3 different whale skeleton microhabitats...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The potential effects of ocean acidification on the carbon flux and trophic interactions of benthic communities are still poorly understood. We aimed to elucidate how low pH conditions alter the organic carbon flux from phytoplankton input into benthic macrofaunal and bacterial communities through pulse-chase experiments. A microcosm pulse-chase ex...
Article
Full-text available
A new whale-fall community was discovered in the abyssal SW Atlantic Ocean (4204 m depth) during the Iatá-piúna expedition. Several specimens of a new nereidid were found living in sediments around and immediately below whalebones. This new species, Neanthes shinkai, is described here. The most interesting feature of the new species is the absence...
Poster
The shrimp genus Alvinocaris is exclusively associated with deep-sea chemosynthetic communities. A. muricola and its sister species A. markensis have been reported on seeps from East Atlantic (EA) and Gulf of Mexico (GoM) and vents from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). In the present work, we report the first A. muricola individuals associated with wh...
Article
A new polychaete species, Sphaerodoropsis kitazatoi (Annelida: Phyllodocida: Sphaerodoridae), is described from the abyssal Southwest Atlantic Ocean at the base of São Paulo Ridge (4204 m depth). This species was found in sediments impacted by a whale carcass. The new species has four longitudinal rows of macrotubercles and one transversal row per...
Article
Al­though it is well rec­og­nized the cap­i­tal role of “bone-eat­ing” Osedax worms in the degra­da­tion of ver­te­brate skele­tons in the deep sea, very lit­tle is known about their ef­fects on bone fau­nal as­sem­blages. Here we aim to shed light on the bone col­o­niza­tion process and de­ter­mine 1) whether Osedax degra­da­tion in­duces dif­fer­...
Article
Full-text available
Diversity and distribution of polychaetes on the southeastern Brazilian Shelf (SBS) adjacent to the city of Santos were studied. The study area is situated in the vicinity of Santos Bay with its estuarine complex and other small rivers along the coast. A total of 16,274 specimens belonging to 214 polychaete species were found at 21 sampling station...
Article
Full-text available
Whale carcasses create remarkable habitats in the deep-sea by producing concentrated sources of organic matter for a food-deprived biota as well as places of evolutionary novelty and biodiversity. Although many of the faunal patterns on whale falls have already been described, the biogeography of these communities is still poorly known especially f...
Article
Full-text available
Carbon mineralization processes and their dependence on environmental conditions (e.g. through macrobenthic bioturbation) have been widely studied in temperate coastal sediments, but almost nothing is known about these processes in subtropical coastal sediments. This study investigated pathways of organic carbon mineralization and associated effect...

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The Atacama Trench, belonging to the Peru-Chile Trench system, is the most southern and deepest trench of the eastern Pacific Ocean. The trench receives substantial inputs of organic matter from the rich productive surface water. An early study in Atacama Trench, based on a single site at 7800 m depth, revealed an extraordinarily high meiofauna density, dominated by nematodes. Subsequent studies have shown that trench systems are hotspot of deposition and mineralization of organic matter, being and important ecosystem for the carbon cycle. The main aim of this project is to reveal how the organic matter input can affect the fauna living in trench systems comparing a trench under a eutrophic region (Atacama Trench) against a trench under oligotrophic region (Kermadec Trench). The quantity and quality of organic matter can change along the trench system and for this reason the second goal of this project is to investigate the spatial heterogeneity of fauna along the trench axis and the trench edge.
Project
This project is coordinate by Prof. Paulo Y. G. Sumida (Instituto Oceanográfico - Universidade de São Paulo). Evidence
 shows
 that
 organic
 islands
 contribute
 significantly
 to
 deep
 benthic
 biodiversity,
 with
 highly 
specialized
 life
 histories.
 However,
 there
 is 
 a 
large 
gap 
on 
the 
large 
scale 
patterns
 of
 biodiversity,
 biogeography
 and
 connectivity
 of
 the
 populations
 that
 exploit
 these
 islands,
 as
 well
 as
 on
 the
 relationships
 between
 diversity
 and
 ecosystem
 function.
 The BioSuOr project has been designed to
 study
 the
 biota
 associated
 with
 organic‐rich
 islands
 in
 the
 deep‐sea
 (whale
 bones
 and
 wood
 parcels)
 in
 the
 SE
 Brazilian
 margin,
 in
 areas
 under
 whale
 migratory
 routes
 and
 historical 
proximity 
to 
large
 continental
 forests.
 In
 order
 to investigate the organic fall habitats in deep sea we
 used
 an
 advanced
 experimental
 design
 through
 the
 deployment of quantitative experimental benthic landers with
 whale
 bones
 and
 wood
 parcels
 at
 depths
 of
 1500
 and
 3300
 m
. Interbasin
 comparison
 of
 biodiversity
 and
 functioning
 of
 these
 islands
 (SW
 Atlantic
 vs.
 NE
 Pacific)
 will
 be
 achieved
 through 
an 
international 
collaboration
 project,
 which 
will 
be 
jointly 
submitted
 to 
the 
National
 Science
 Foundation
 by
 Dr.
 Craig
 R.
 Smith
 of
 the
 University
 of
 Hawaii.
 The project has also a collaboration with Dr. Ken Halanych from Auburn University. My PhD project is part of BioSuOr project, I'm addressing the following key questions: 1) Does the Annelida diversity (with emphasis on polychaete worms) of bone communities vary between depths? 2) What is the connectivity of the bone-eating worms populations (Osedax spp) and of the opportunistic polychaete worm populations (Capitella spp) between both depths and within same depth?