Mauricio González-Forero

Mauricio González-Forero
University of St Andrews · School of Biology

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16
Publications
2,185
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163
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - September 2016
University of Lausanne
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (16)
Preprint
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Natural selection acts on developmentally constructed phenotypes. Ever since the modern synthesis, many researchers have called for integration of development into evolution, but there has been a lack of general mathematical frameworks explicitly integrating the two. This has likely inhibited understanding of the evolutionary effects of development...
Preprint
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Natural selection acts on phenotypes constructed over development, which raises the question of how development affects evolution. Existing mathematical theory has considered either evolutionary dynamics while neglecting developmental dynamics, or developmental dynamics while neglecting evolutionary dynamics by assuming evolutionary equilibrium. We...
Article
Full-text available
Eusociality, where largely unreproductive offspring help their mothers reproduce, is a major form of social organization. An increasingly documented feature of eusociality is that mothers induce their offspring to help by means of hormones, pheromones or behavioural displays, with evidence often indicating that offspring help voluntarily. The co-oc...
Preprint
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Major evolutionary transitions have produced higher-level individuals constituting new levels of adaptation with extensive effects on the history of life. How such transitions occur remains an outstanding question. We show that a major transition can happen from ancestral exploitation triggering specialization that eventually dissolves conflict. Sp...
Article
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The human brain is unusually large. It has tripled in size from Australopithecines to modern humans¹ and has become almost six times larger than expected for a placental mammal of human size². Brains incur high metabolic costs³ and accordingly a long-standing question is why the large human brain has evolved⁴. The leading hypotheses propose benefit...
Article
Full-text available
Complex cognition and relatively large brains are distributed across various taxa, and many primarily verbal hypotheses exist to explain such diversity. Yet, mathematical approaches formalizing verbal hypotheses would help deepen the understanding of brain and cognition evolution. With this aim, we combine elements of life history and metabolic the...
Data
Appendix. Analytical results, parameter estimation, numerical implementation, and supplementary numerical results. (PDF)
Data
Computer code. MATLAB computer code for solutions using GPOPS. (ZIP)
Article
Full-text available
Mathematical modeling of brain evolution is scarce, possibly due in part to the difficulty of describing how brain relates to fitness. Yet such modeling is needed to formalize verbal arguments and deepen our understanding of brain evolution. To address this issue, we combine elements of life history and metabolic theories to formulate a metabolical...
Article
In many eusocial species, queens use pheromones to influence offspring to express worker phenotypes. Although evidence suggests that queen pheromones are honest signals of the queen's reproductive health, here I show that queen's honest signalling can result from ancestral maternal manipulation. I develop a mathematical model to study the coevoluti...
Article
Individuals can manipulate the behavior of social partners. However, manipulation may conflict with the fitness interests of the manipulated individuals. Manipulated individuals can then be favored to resist manipulation, possibly reducing or eliminating the manipulated behavior in the long run. I use a mathematical model to show that conflicts whe...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Many social behaviors are triggered by social partners. For example, cells in a multicellular organism often become soma via extrinsically regulated differentiation, while individuals in a eusocial colony often become helpers via extrinsic caste determination. One explanation for social triggering is that it informs when it is beneficial t...
Article
The biological species concept (BSC) is a common way to define species although it is ambiguous even when strictly applied. I interpret it here syntactically in four different ways and show that one of them is more suitable than previously thought. The first interpretation (fully restricted) produces discrete, non-overlapping biological species wit...

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