Mauricio Cantor

Mauricio Cantor
Oregon State University | OSU · Department of Fisheries and Wildlife

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.
Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Sciences, and Marine Mammal Institute at Oregon State University

About

115
Publications
19,007
Reads
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1,371
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - December 2014
Dalhousie University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Analysis of Biological Data, TA and demonstrator
May 2012 - July 2016
Dalhousie University
Position
  • PhD Student
January 2009 - April 2011
Federal University of Santa Catarina
Position
  • Master's Student

Publications

Publications (115)
Article
Full-text available
Culture is increasingly being understood as a driver of mammalian phenotypes. Defined as group-specific behaviour transmitted by social learning, culture is shaped by social structure. However, culture can itself affect social structure if individuals preferentially interact with others whose behaviour is similar, or cultural symbols are used to ma...
Article
Full-text available
Multilevel societies, containing hierarchically nested social levels, are remarkable social structures whose origins are unclear. The social relationships of sperm whales are organized in a multilevel society with an upper level composed of clans of individuals communicating using similar patterns of clicks (codas). Using agent-based models informe...
Article
Cetaceans are fully aquatic predatory mammals that have successfully colonized virtually all marine habitats. Their adaptation to these habitats, so radically different from those of their terrestrial ancestors, can give us comparative insights into the evolution of female roles and kinship in mammalian societies. We provide a review of the diversi...
Article
Across animal societies, individuals invest time and energy in social interactions. The social landscape that emerges from these interactions can then generate barriers that limit the ability of individuals to disperse to, and reproduce in, groups or populations. Therefore, social barriers can contribute to the difference between the physical capac...
Article
Multilevel societies (MLSs), stable nuclear social units within a larger collective encompassing multiple nested social levels, occur in several mammalian lineages. Their architectural complexity and size impose specific demands on their members requiring adaptive solutions in multiple domains. The functional significance of MLSs lies in their memb...
Article
Full-text available
Human–wildlife cooperation occurs when humans and free-living wild animals actively coordinate their behavior to achieve a mutually beneficial outcome. These interactions provide important benefits to both the human and wildlife communities involved, have wider impacts on the local ecosystem, and represent a unique intersection of human and animal...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Human‐wildlife cooperation is a type of mutualism in which a human and a wild, free‐living animal actively coordinate their behaviour to achieve a common beneficial outcome. While other cooperative human‐animal interactions involving captive coercion or artificial selection (including domestication) have received extensive attention, we la...
Article
Full-text available
Effective conservation actions require effective population monitoring. However, accurately counting animals in the wild to inform conservation decision-making is difficult. Monitoring populations through image sampling has made data collection cheaper, wide-reaching and less intrusive but created a need to process and analyse this data efficiently...
Article
Full-text available
1. Human-wildlife cooperation is a type of mutualism in which a human and a wild, free-living animal actively coordinate their behaviour to achieve a common beneficial outcome. 2. While other cooperative human-animal interactions involving captive coer-cion or artificial selection (including domestication) have received extensive
Article
Food provisioning promotes close interaction with wildlife but can negatively impact the targeted species. Repeated behavioural disruptions have the potential to negatively impact vital rates and have population level consequences. In Bunbury, Western Australia, food-provisioned female bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops aduncus, suffer reduced reproduct...
Article
Full-text available
Social foraging decisions depend on individual payoffs. However, it is unclear how individual variation in phenotypic and behavioural traits can influence these payoffs, thereby the decisions to forage socially or individually. Here, we studied how individual traits influence foraging tactics of net-casting fishers who interact with wild dolphins....
Article
Understanding the dynamics of small-scale fisheries requires considering the diversity of behaviours and skills of fishers. Fishers may have different abilities and tactics that can translate into different fishing outcomes. Here, we investigate variation in fishing behaviours among traditional net-casting fishers that are assisted by wild dolphins...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying individual animals is critical to describe demographic and behavioural patterns, and to investigate the ecological and evolutionary underpinnings of these patterns. The traditional non-invasive method of individual identification in mammals—comparison of photographed natural marks—has been improved by coupling other sampling methods, su...
Article
Full-text available
By shaping where individuals move, habitat configuration can fundamentally structure animal populations. Yet, we currently lack a framework for generating quantitative predictions about the role of habitat configuration in modulating population outcomes. To address this gap, we propose a modelling framework inspired by studies using networks to cha...
Article
Marine apex predators, such as coastal dolphins, are key components of ecosystem function and dynamics; understanding their spatial use therefore is important for conservation planning. Here, we describe spatial use of the threatened Guiana dolphin, Sotalia guianensis, within a mosaic of protected areas at their southern range in the Paranaguá estu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Effective conservation actions require effective population monitoring. However, accurately counting animals in the wild to inform conservation decision-making is difficult. Monitoring populations through image sampling has made data collection cheaper, wide-reaching and less intrusive but created a need to process and analyse this data efficiently...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to build upon previous knowledge—cumulative cultural evolution—is a hallmark of human societies. While cumulative cultural evolution depends on the interaction between social systems, cognition and the environment, there is increasing evidence that cumulative cultural evolution is facilitated by larger and more structured societies. How...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ability to build upon previous knowledge—cumulative cultural evolution (CCE)—is a hallmark of human societies. While CCE depends on the interaction between social systems, cognition and the environment, there is increasing evidence that CCE is facilitated by larger and more structured societies. However, the relative importance of social networ...
Article
• Sperm whales have occupied the waters off the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador, for at least the past 200 years. During the 19th century, they were the target of intensive whaling that severely depleted the population. In recent times, after commercial whaling ended, sperm whales in the region remain vulnerable to multiple threats, especially potential...
Article
Full-text available
The social decisions that individuals make-who to interact with and how frequently-gives rise to social structure. The resulting social structure then determines how individuals interact with their surroundings-resources and risks, pathogens and predators, competitors and cooperators. However, despite intensive research on (i) how individuals make...
Article
Full-text available
Living in groups can benefit individuals in many ways, including in innovative problem solving. Several hypotheses have suggested mechanisms to explain why larger groups disproportionately outperform smaller groups, including the skill pool and pool of competence effects. However, disentangling these potential mechanisms from the effects of group s...
Preprint
Full-text available
By shaping where individuals move, habitat configuration can fundamentally structure animal populations. Yet, we currently lack a framework for generating quantitative predictions about the role of habitat configuration in modulating population outcomes. For example, it is well known that the social structure of animal populations can shape spreadi...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the interplay between processes operating at large and small spatiotemporal scales in shaping biotic interactions remains challenging. Recent studies illustrate how phenotypic specialization, species life‐history traits and/or resource partitioning recurrently underlie the structure of mutualistic interactions in terrestrial ecosystem...
Article
Social preferences in pigs have received little attention despite the welfare implication of providing an adequate social environment for farm animals. We investigated the extent to which domestic pigs show affiliative preferences in three behavioural contexts—rest, exploration, social nosing—and whether these preferences were influenced by sex, re...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Human-animal interactions with mutual benefits in the wild are rare. Such positive interactions seem to require an intricate knowledge from the human side on the animals' behavior and their habitat. In southern Brazil, dolphins and human net-casting fishers have specialized in a cooperative foraging, in which fishers report being able...
Article
Sea turtles are globally threatened due to short-and long-term exposure to anthropogenic activities. Many life-history traits make it difficult to study these species in the wild. Stranding events provide invaluable data to infer key aspects of sea turtle ecology, such as regional occurrence , health status, mortality rates, and potential threats....
Article
Full-text available
Structurally complex and competitive environments such as reef habitats may promote alternative behavioural feeding tactics in fishes. An understudied behavioural tactic is the follower-feeding association, in which individuals of a species follow (called “follower”) and benefit from the foraging activities of individuals of another species that di...
Chapter
Among large variations in size, habitat use, trophic niche, and social systems of toothed whales, one species—the sperm whale—stands out as an animal of extremes. The world’s largest biological sonar operated by the largest brain on Earth shapes much of sperm whales’ lives as efficient predators, exploiting massive biological resources at great dep...
Preprint
Full-text available
1.The social decisions that individuals make, in terms of where to move, who to interact with and how frequently, scale up to generate social structure. Such structure has profound consequences: individuals each have a unique social environment, social interactions can amplify or dampen individual differences at the population level, and population...
Article
Individuals often associate socially with those who behave the sameway. This principle, homophily, could structure populations into distinct social groups. We tested this hypothesis in a bottlenose dolphin population that appeared to be clustered around a specialized foraging tactic involving cooperation with net-casting fishermen, but in which oth...
Article
Ecological niche is traditionally defined at the species level, but individual niches can vary considerably within species. Research on intra-specific niche variation has been focussed on intrinsic drivers. However, differential transmission of socially learned behaviours can also lead to intra-specific niche variation. In sperm whales Physeter mac...
Article
Full-text available
The functionality of distinct types of protein networks depends on the patterns of protein-protein interactions. A problem to solve is understanding the fragility of protein networks to predict system malfunctioning due to mutations and other errors. Spectral graph theory provides tools to understand the structural and dynamical properties of a sys...
Article
The dynamic nature of animal societies often hides multiple layers of complexity. The field of animal behaviour is rapidly advancing with the development of increasingly sophisticated analytical methods that allow scientists to identify complex and nuanced drivers of social patterns. The resurgent interest in giraffe sociality illustrates this by c...
Article
Aim We studied the underlying biotic and abiotic drivers of network patterns in marine cleaning mutualisms (species feeding upon ectoparasites and injured tissues of others) at large spatial scales. Location: Eleven marine biogeographical provinces. Time period: 1971–2018. Major taxa studied: Reef fish and shrimps. Methods We combined field and li...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biological systems are organized as networks. A central problem in the study of biological networks is to understand if and how the network structure affects the fragility of biological systems to multiple types of perturbations. For example, the functionality and fragility of protein networks may depend on their network structure, and mutations an...
Article
Full-text available
Social vertebrates commonly form foraging groups whose members repeatedly interact with one another and are often genetically related. Many species also exhibit within‐population specializations, which can range from preferences to forage in particular areas through to specializing on the type of prey they catch. However, within‐population structur...
Article
According to theory, individuals forage in ways that maximize net energy intake. Distinct foraging strategies may emerge within a population in response to heterogeneous resources, competition and learning, among other drivers. We assessed individual variation in, and ecological consequences of, an unusual, specialized foraging tactic between anima...
Chapter
Tropical reefs are, figuratively, the underwater counterparts of tropical rainforests. Both complex, three-dimensional natural systems harbour an impressive diversity of species. The diversity of ecological interactions taking place among these species is no less striking: their intricate webs add another level of complexity to these natural system...
Article
Estimating population parameters is essential for understanding the ecology of species, which ultimately helps to assess their conservation status. The seahorse Hippocampus reidi is directly exposed to anthropogenic threats along the Brazilian coast, but the species still figures as Data Deficient (DD) at IUCN’s Red List. To provide better informat...
Article
Acoustic communication is a taxonomically widespread phenomenon, crucial for social animals. We evaluate social sounds from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) of Laguna, southern Brazil, whose social structure is organized around a cooperative for- aging tactic with artisanal fishermen. This tactic involves stereotyped and coordinated behavio...
Article
While population sizes and structures naturally fluctuate over time, rapid within-generation changes are usually driven by shifts in habitat quality and (or) abrupt mortality. We evaluate how sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus L., 1758 = Physeter catodon L., 1758) responded to the dynamic habit off the Galápagos Islands over 30 years, relating it...
Article
Full-text available
Biological networks pervade nature. They describe systems throughout all levels of biological organization, from molecules regulating metabolism to species interactions that shape ecosystem dynamics. The network thinking revealed recurrent organizational patterns in complex biological systems, such as the formation of semi-independent groups of con...
Data
Methodological approach to define a binary interaction in weighted networks. Color code corresponds to the strength of the interaction between elements. Hypothetical square adjacency matrices in which (A) the interactions between elements of a one-mode network are filtered off according to cut-offs (x) that range from 0.1 to 0.9 in interaction weig...
Data
Relationship between Unipartite Nestedness (UNODF) and size of theoretical nested one-mode networks. (A) UNODF and size (number of nodes, n) of perfectly nested networks. (B) Adjacency binary matrices (yellow cell = 1, blue = 0) of representative small networks (20 > n > 3) and their respective unipartite nestedness values among columns and rows (U...
Data
Network metrics describing the centralization of the network and Unipartite Nestedness (UNODF) in one-mode networks. Centralization is measured here by 6 metrics (colored lines) for both theoretical (perfectly nested, Barabási, Erdös-Rènyi) and empirical networks (three examples for each of the six biological levels: molecular, individual, populati...
Data
Relationship between Unipartite Nestedness (UNODF), network connectance and size. (A) UNODF and network connectance (proportion of realized links in relation to possible links); and (B) UNODF and network size (number of nodes). A simple linear regression suggests that UNODF increases with connectance (R2 = 0.73, p<0.0001) but not with size (R2 = 0....
Data
Relationship between Unipartite Nestedness (UNODF) and network centralization, as given by a simple linear model. Here, we corrected UNODF for network connectance using the residuals of the regression between UNODF and connectance; see S5 Fig. Centralization was described using the first principal component to summarize (A) all 6 centralization met...
Data
Characterization of the 18 systems encompassing six levels of organization considered in this study and the biological entities or processes depicted by their network representation. (DOCX)
Article
Social grooming is conspicuous in group-living mammals. Bats are gregarious andmay groom each other, but the motivation for such social behaviour remains unclear. Here, we describe patterns and infer function of social grooming in tent-making Indian short-nosed fruit bats. Combining field and captivity observations, we found that males and their ha...
Article
Full-text available
Clues of cultural transmission in cooperative foraging between artisanal fishermen and bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus (Cetacea: Delphinidae) In summary, we identified the following evidence in favor of the cultural transmission of the cooperative foraging tactic among dolphins: stereotyped and synchronized behav-iors, which are shared amon...
Article
Full-text available
The number and strength of social relationships are generally the products of group living trade-offs. However, they can be at least partially influenced by asocial factors such as the spatiotemporal opportunities for individuals to interact. We explored the social patterns of the largest population of Guiana dolphins—from dyadic interactions to th...
Article
Full-text available
While populations may wax and wane, it is rare for an entire population to be replaced by a completely different set of individuals. We document the large-scale relocation of cultural groups of sperm whale off the Galápagos Islands, in which two sympatric vocal clans were entirely replaced by two different ones. Between 1985 and 1999, whales from t...