Maureen J. Reed

Maureen J. Reed
Ryerson University · Department of Psychology

About

60
Publications
27,776
Reads
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994
Citations
Citations since 2017
21 Research Items
651 Citations
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Introduction
Maureen J. Reed is a full professor at the Department of Psychology, Ryerson University. Maureen does research in Higher Education Success, Psychophysics, Experimental Psychology, Visual Perception and Cognitive Psychology. Their current project is 'Student balance.'
Additional affiliations
August 2001 - September 2017
Ryerson University
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (60)
Article
Animal-assisted intervention (AAI) has been used as a means of stress relief in clinical and general settings; however, animals are not always allowed in certain spaces. Adapting AAI to video or virtual mediums could improve accessibility and is temporally relevant given the recent shift to online interventions. The current study explored: (1) whet...
Article
Full-text available
Fifty-two faculty at two Canadian universities were interviewed about the impact of work environment, role conflict, and worklife balance on career-related experiences and decisions to apply for promotion to full professor. Faculty described conflicts between their academic responsibilities of teaching, research, and service (including limited time...
Article
Research indicates that animal-assisted therapy programs can reduce stress responses. However, animals are not always permitted in public settings. Thus, alternative forms to the physical presence of an animal could be beneficial. The objective of this study was to determine (1) whether exposure to an active-dog video can help improve subjective an...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we discuss further advancements to the Multi-System Model of Resilience through examining empirical factor structures of the Multi-System Model of Resilience Inventory along with other measures of resilience. Evidence from multiple sampled populations provided support for the three-systems organization of the model and highlight its...
Article
Background/Rationale There is no current consensus on operational definitions of resilience. Instead, researchers often debate the optimal approach to understanding resilience, while continuing to explore ways to enhance and/or promote its qualities in various populations. The goal of the current meta-analysis is to substantiate existing evidence e...
Article
The aim of this pilot study was to examine the effects of different videos of an unfamiliar dog (tranquil and active) on subjective mental state measures. All participants watched two videos of an unfamiliar dog (tranquil and active). Subjective measures of stress, anxiety, alertness, attention, likeability, and cuteness were assessed. The results...
Article
Changes in technology have increased our capacity to interface with existing tools and measures in social sciences and healthcare research. Demands for increased accessibility and preference for flexibility in data collection have resulted in an influx of technological innovations and adaptations of existing tools. Yet, the usability of digital ada...
Article
Full-text available
While responses to stressors have both adverse and positive consequences on health, many believe that stress is entirely negative. Research revealed that negative beliefs about stress can hinder well‐being and result in the avoidance of stressors. Stress‐optimizing interventions that target various stress appraisal processes may be a useful tool to...
Article
Pets can reduce stress in their owner; however, they are not always permitted in public and institutional places. This study examined the impact of people viewing a picture of their pet versus other images on stress levels. One hundred and twenty participants were randomly assigned to one of six conditions. These involved completing a mental arithm...
Article
Full-text available
The University Life Experience (ULE) scale was created to determine how students utilize their time between academic (class and preparatory) and non-academic (work, social, leisure, and health) activities. In addition to the ULE, 239 undergraduate students completed inventories assessing academic resourcefulness, academic self-efficacy, and univers...
Article
This paper synthesizes the literature on cognitive aging, emotion regulation, and humor, to provide a theoretical framework for the utility of humor in promoting successful cognitive aging. Many older adults experience some degree of cognitive decline, which is associated with reductions in functional status, independence, and overall quality of li...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This is a report of a symposium on Globalized and Internationalized Universities from August 2018. The symposium was attended globally by members of the WC2 Network and was supported by Ryerson University and Ryerson International.
Article
Full-text available
First-generation students are often described as disadvantaged in university adjustment, self-efficacy and grades. Yet this deficit model of understanding first-generation students ignores their cultural capital, which could increase resilience and resourcefulness. Here, 844 students (31% first-generation) in South Africa and Canada completed measu...
Article
Full-text available
Increasingly, students engage in multitasking during lecture by shifting their attention between class material and irrelevant information from texts and webpages. It is well established that this divided attention impairs memory and learning. Less is known about how to correct the problem. This study used an educational intervention in the form of...
Article
Canadian students have academic and non-academic obligations, and their ability to balance them may impact university experience. Involvement in academic and non-academic activities, and the perception of balancing them was compared between students with and without disabilities. Results revealed that both groups of students participated in employm...
Article
Full-text available
Background The consequences of stress are typically regarded from a deficit-oriented approach, conceptualizing stress to be entirely negative in its outcomes. This approach is unbalanced, and may further hinder individuals from engaging in adaptive coping. In the current study, we explored whether negative views and beliefs regarding stress interac...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we examine the dynamic nature of the resilience process as an interaction between individuals and their larger socio-ecological context. We introduce a novel, multi-systems model of resilience that addresses limitations within existing models, clarifies ambiguity brought on by heterogeneous definitions of resilience, and recognizes r...
Article
Full-text available
Canadian students have academic and non-academic obligations, and their ability to balance them may impact university experience. Involvement in academic and non-academic activities, and the perception of balancing them was compared between students with and without disabilities. Results revealed that both groups of students participated in employm...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Today, students entering higher education are diverse and include many students who in previous generations did not attend higher education. Research shows that these non-traditional students (e.g., first generation students, students with disabilities, older students) often feel less prepared for higher education (Reed et al., 2006; Stebleton &...
Article
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The objective of this study was to examine whether continuing education that focuses on service learning could provide older students (over the age of 50) with knowledge and skills that increase their life satisfaction, confidence, and community integration. We also examined whether it could provide them with meaningful and purposeful experiences....
Article
Full-text available
Visual perception is constructive in nature; that is, a coherent whole is generated from ambiguous fragments that are encountered in dynamic visual scenes. Creating this coherent whole from fragmented sensory inputs requires one to detect, identify, distinguish and organize sensory input. The organization of fragments into a coherent whole is facil...
Chapter
Professor James feels his first lecture to his business class was a disaster. Teaching has always come easy to him, until today. Professor James recently moved from a small private university to this large public university. The students in his previous school were quite homogeneous. They came to him with similar backgrounds, similar knowledge and...
Chapter
Older adults continue to drive. Past research has focused on predictors of safe driving performance as it relates to age-related losses in vision, attention, mobility, and cognition. As a result of these changes, many older adults self-restrict their driving. These self-restrictions require an ability to self-assess driving performance. However, re...
Article
Full-text available
Students choose to go to university for many reasons. They include those with disabilities and those without. The reasons why students with disabilities go to university and how these reasons impact university experience, including coping (academic resourcefulness), adapting, academic ability beliefs (academic self-efficacy), and grades, are invest...
Article
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When one sense is unavailable, sensory responsibilities shift and processing of the remaining modalities becomes enhanced to compensate for missing information. This shift, referred to as compensatory plasticity, results in a unique sensory experience for individuals who are deaf, including the manner in which music is perceived. This paper evaluat...
Article
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It is a well-known phenomenon that generally resourceful students are more likely to employ specific self-control skills, such as academic resourcefulness, to overcome stressors in their life, and as a result, are more likely to be better adjusted, to receive higher grades, and to remain in university than their less resourceful counterparts. To wh...
Article
Introduction: This article presents a study of the higher education experiences of students with visual impairments in Canada. Methods: Students with visual impairments and the staff members of disability programs were surveyed and interviewed regarding the students' experiences in entering higher education and completing their higher education req...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction This article presents a study of the higher education experiences of students with visual impairments in Canada. Methods Students with visual impairments and the staff members of disability programs were surveyed and interviewed regarding the students’ experiences in entering higher education and completing their higher education requ...
Article
This study examined whether the nonitem-specific retest learning effects, previously shown with young-old adults primarily in their 60s and 70s, could be extended to oldest-old adults aged 80 and onward. Twenty-one oldest-olds participated in an 8-session retest training program with three ability domains: perceptual speed, inductive reasoning, and...
Article
The objective of the study presented here was to understand the experiences of teachers in assisting students with visual impairments in making the transition to higher education. The teachers reported barriers in high school that affect students' access to and success in higher education. Furthermore, institutions of higher education provided litt...
Article
Full-text available
Positive outcomes have been reported for university preparation courses for students without disabilities. Little is known about whether these courses can offer the same benefit to students with learning disabilities and whether the inclusion of psychosocial factors, in addition to academic skills, would benefit both groups. First-level students wi...
Article
Full-text available
Little research has been conducted to understand the difference in driving performance between younger-old adults (60-75 years) and older-old adults (76+ years), or simply younger olds and older olds. The main objective of this study was to determine if a minimal increase in road light level (luminance) differently affects the performance of these...
Article
Full-text available
The main objective of this study was to determine if a minimal increase in road light level (luminance) could lead to improved driving performance among older adults. Older, middle- aged and younger adults were tested in a driving simulator following vision and cognitive screening. Comparisons were made for the performance of simulated night drivin...
Article
Full-text available
Few studies have directly asked undergraduate students their reasons for coming to institutions for higher learning and, instead, have been developed based on theoretical rationale. We asked undergraduate students to list all of their reasons for attending university and to indicate those most important. Overall, students reported more than five an...
Article
Few studies have directly asked undergraduate students their reasons for coming to institutions for higher learning and, instead, have been developed based on theoretical rationale. We asked undergraduate students to list all of their reasons for attending university and to indicate those most important. Overall, students reported more than five an...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents the results of a project funded by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario regarding the experiences of older adults with night driving. The results are based on an online internet survey that consisted of 15 questions covering key issues in assessing the difficulties faced by older drivers at night. The respondents were asked...
Article
Purpose: Deficits of motion perception have been reported for older adults. Here we examine the effects of attention and aging on the detection of motion and judgments of motion direction. Methods: Twenty-one older and twenty-one younger adults were asked to view a fixation cross and determine the direction and location of motion in a single dot mo...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the relative effects of post‐secondary learning services for students with learning disabilities. We compared outcomes for students with learning disabilities who selected to: (1) take an academic learning success course (course‐intervention), (2) have regular individual interventions (high‐intervention) or (3) use services on...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated retest learning (i.e., performance improvement through retest practice) in the absence of item-specific effects (i.e., learning through memorizing or becoming familiar with specific items) with older adults. Thirty-one older adults (ages 60-82 years, M = 71.10, SD = 6.27) participated in an eight-session self-guided retest program....
Article
Full-text available
We examined the psycho-social factors predicting performance and retention following a post-secondary success course that was developed after Rosenbaum's (199023. Rosenbaum , M. 1990. “The role of learned resourcefulness in the self-control of health behavior”. In Learned resourcefulness: On coping skills, self-control and adaptive behavior, Edite...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: In this study, we sought to describe information literacy success outcomes for students who participated in a university course where university librarians and teaching faculty collaborated in all aspects of the course including; curricular development, assignment development, in-class teaching, office hours for individual student developm...
Article
The validity of preschool vision screening has been questioned in the light of the World Health Organization's criteria for determining the validity of screening programs. However, recommendations toward preschool screening have been made by a number of organizations. Given the contrasting views of screening, the purpose of this study was to examin...
Article
In this study, children with strabismus, as a group, had significantly more academic and nonacademic difficulties than did children without strabismus. However, since not all the children with strabismus had academic difficulties, other factors that are associated with strabismus, such as headache, eyestrain, perceptual difficulties, and frustratio...
Article
Full-text available
Standards of practice for postsecondary special needs programmes are an important element to determining programme effectiveness and programme successes. A number of groups have now suggested practice standards for postsecondary special needs programmes. We amalga-mated these suggested practices and queried Ontario students and administrators regar...
Article
Deficits of motion processing have been reported in individuals with infantile strabismus. Here we examined motion perception in early and late onset strabismic individuals with varying levels of stereo acuity using the Fine Grain Motion Illusion (FGMI). The FGMI is an illusion of motion, where under some conditions, observers report exaggerated mo...
Article
Several reports on monocular optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) in observers with strabismus have found that asymmetry of OKN tends to occur in both eyes of observers with an early onset of strabismus but only in the deviating eye of those with a later onset of strabismus. Our objective was to quantify and compare the magnitude of the OKN asymmetry in eac...
Article
We previously reported that unilaterally eye enucleated subjects show superior contrast letter acuity to normally sighted monocular viewing control subjects. We suggested that reorganization of the visual system in the enucleated subjects may compensate for their loss of binocularity. Here we measured contrast letter acuity in normally sighted bino...
Article
To investigate the effects of visual disruption on contrast letter thresholds of the non-affected eye, subjects with one eye enucleated, strabismic subjects using the non-deviating eye and normal control subjects were asked to identify letters on eye charts and single letter cards which varied in contrast (between 4 and 96%) and size. At all contra...
Article
Purpose. Reed and colleagues (1991) tested monocular OKN in the non-deviating eye of strabismic subjects and found an asymmetry of OKN in favour of nasalward motion which tended to be more symmetrical with a later onset of strabismus. Does early deprivation produce a more binocular, i.e. bilateral effect, than does later onset deprivation? We measu...
Article
For normal sighted observers visual performance is often superior on the principal meridians than on the oblique. There has been no clear consensus on whether disruption of the visual system affects performance on orientation sensitivity tasks. Here we compare the abilities of normally sighted subjects tested monocularly, subjects with one eye enuc...
Article
Assymmetries of monocular optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) following anomalous visual experience are thought to be due to disruption at the cortical level. Visual disruption usually results from eye suture (in animals), unilateral dense and central cataracts or strabismus (in humans). Many form-deprived animals and humans frequently show a residual stra...

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Projects (3)
Archived project
Scale construction project that aims to develop a psychometric measure of resilience following the proposed Multi-System Model of Resilience.