Maureece Jacqueline Levin

Maureece Jacqueline Levin
Valdosta State University | VSU · Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice

PhD in Anthropology (Archaeology specialization), University of Oregon, 2015

About

28
Publications
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Introduction
I am an archaeologist and paleoethnobotanist with interests in food production systems, historical ecology, human niche construction, and social change. I use plant microremains (phytoliths and starch) as well as plant macroremains to understand farming and human-environment relationships. Most of my research has focused on the Pacific Islands, especially central-eastern Micronesia. However, recently I have also begun collaborating on projects focusing on early agriculture in China.
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - August 2019
Stanford University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
June 2011 - August 2011
Australian National University
Position
  • National Science Foundation EAPSI (East Asia and Pacific Summer Institute) Fellow
September 2006 - July 2015
University of Oregon
Position
  • Graduate Student (MA and PhD)

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
The production of alcoholic beverages is connected to a wide range of activities associated with growing social complexity. Beer production has a long history in the southern Levant, where the first evidence appeared during the later Epipalaeolithic period. However, there is meager evidence between then and the Early Bronze Age period, when advance...
Article
In this paper, we focus on a Neolithic Yangshao culture community with emergent social hierarchy associated with feasting activities. We analyzed the microfossil remains (micro-botanical and fungi) on 15 vessels excavated from the cemetery section of the Xipo site in northern China, highlighting four dakougang large vats with non-local characterist...
Article
Full-text available
Environmentally transformative human use of land accelerated with the emergence of agriculture, but the extent, trajectory, and implications of these early changes are not well understood. An empirical global assessment of land use from 10,000 years before the present (yr B.P.) to 1850 CE reveals a planet largely transformed by hunter-gatherers, fa...
Article
Full-text available
Human settlement of the Caribbean represents the only example in the Americas of peoples colonizing islands that were not visible from surrounding mainland areas or other islands. Unfortunately, many interpretive models have relied on radiocarbon determinations that do not meet standard criteria for reporting because they lack critical information...
Article
Full-text available
An airborne LiDAR survey of the Nan Madol World Heritage Site and adjacent Temwen Island revealed a complex, irrigated cultivation system, the first found in the Central and Eastern Caroline Islands. This informs the goals of the sustainable conservation project, funded by the U.S. Department of State Ambassadors Fund for Cultural Preservation, tha...
Article
Full-text available
In China, pottery containers first appeared about 20000 cal. BP, and became diverse in form during the Early Neolithic (9000–7000 cal. BP), signaling the emergence of functionally specialized vessels. China is also well-known for its early development of alcohol production. However, few studies have focused on the connections between the two techno...
Article
Full-text available
Pingelap Atoll, 1.8 km 2 in area and nearly 70 km from the nearest island, presents a clear example of anthropogenic niche-building in physically isolated circumstances with limited resources. This paper presents the first radiocarbon (14 C) dates (n=8) from an archaeological project examining settlement and subsistence practices on the atoll, spec...
Article
Full-text available
In Micronesia, and more broadly in the Pacific Islands, human-introduced plants, especially vegetatively-propagated root/tuber and tree crops, form a large part of local diets. Archaeobotanists working in the region often employ phytolith analysis to understand the landscapes these plants help create, the role that they play in human migration and...
Article
Full-text available
Northern China has been identified as an independent centre of domestication for various types of millet and other plant species, but tracing the earliest evidence for the exploitation of wild cereals and thus the actual domestication process has proven challenging. Evidence from microscopic analyses of stone tools, including use-wear, starch and p...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Report submitted to the Pohnpei State Historic Preservation Office.
Article
Full-text available
Fermentation is a common method of processing and preserving breadfruit throughout the Pacific Islands. While these pits are often reported in the archaeological record, they can pose some interpretive challenges. This paper presents an analysis of probable archaeological breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis (Parkinson) Fosberg) fermentation pits on Temw...
Article
Full-text available
p>This short topical review discusses recent archaeobotanical approaches to understanding food production in Remote Oceania (eastern Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia). The region presents some preservation and interpretative challenges, both due to the lack of cereal crops and the hot and humid climate that prevails through much of the area. Ne...
Article
Chinese millets (Setaria italica and Panicum miliaceum), first domesticated in north China, were among the most important East Asian crops in the past. Previous studies have mainly focused on the morphological changes of millet grains for evidence of domesticity, but very few attempts have been made to understand the predomestication cultivation pr...
Article
Full-text available
http://www.openlettersmonthly.com/of-trowels-and-temples/
Article
Full-text available
A recent publication (Levin and Ayres 2015 Levin, M. J. and W. S. Ayres. 2015. Managed agroforests, swiddening, and the introduction of pigs in Pohnpei, Micronesia: Phytolith evidence from an anthropogenic landscape. Quaternary International. doi:10.1016/j.quaint.2015.12.027.[CrossRef], [PubMed]) presented evidence for cyclical swiddening over a 70...
Article
Phytolith analysis is increasingly contributing to archaeological studies, especially in the context of agriculture in tropical regions. Plant remains from archaeological sites provide key information on such topics as site function, settlement, past dietary patterns, migrations, and landscape formation. However, in the humid tropics, where good pr...
Article
Full-text available
In eastern Micronesia, breadfruit is an important staple crop and has probably been part of the diet since initial settlement. This paper uses combined macroremains and phytolith analysis to identify breadfruit production from a historical feature on Temwen Island, Pohnpei, Micronesia. Charred breadfruit exocarp material was recovered, indicating b...
Thesis
Full-text available
Food production, or the cultivation and processing of edible materials, is closely linked to both the physical environment and human social systems. This is especially true on the islands of Remote Oceania, where cultivation of plants introduced with colonization has always been a key component of survival. This project centers on the production sy...
Thesis
Includes abstract. Thesis (B.A.)--Whitman College, 2003. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 64-67). Computer-produced typeface.

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