Matthijs Kalmijn

Matthijs Kalmijn
University of Amsterdam | UVA · Department of Sociology and Anthropology

About

74
Publications
7,103
Reads
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1,654
Citations
Citations since 2017
16 Research Items
897 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
Introduction

Publications

Publications (74)
Article
Using a national sample of people in same-sex relationships (N = 843) and different-sex relationships (N = 510) in the Netherlands, we examine the frequently discussed but infrequently tested hypothesis of weaker intergenerational ties between parents and their adult daughters and sons in same-sex relationships. We also test hypotheses linking the...
Article
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Objective: This study examines the support from stepparents to adult children and considers the role of the composition of the parent network, that is, the presence or absence of the biological mother or father. Background: Going beyond previous research that compared the support provided by different types of parental households, this study pro...
Article
Full-text available
The interdependence between partners raises considerable interest in the sociology of life course, work, and families. Partner influences play a particularly important role in the work domain, because each partner's work decisions have profound effects on the couple as a whole. In contrast to previous research, this article pays detailed attention...
Article
This paper examines possible differences between lesbians, gay men and bisexuals (LGBs) compared to heterosexuals with respect to their integration into the residential neighbourhood. By means of a multi-level analysis, we examine if there is a gap in social integration between LGBs compared to heterosexuals, and if so, to what extent municipality...
Chapter
This chapter examines differences in the families of ethnic minority and majority youth in four European countries (England, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden). The focus is on the degree to which the father is absent, as indicated by family structure and the strength of the father–child tie. To explain differences, we use three perspectives: a m...
Article
This data brief gives an overview of the background, design, and content of the multi-actor OKiN survey (Ouders en Kinderen in Nederland; Parents and Children in The Netherlands). The purpose of OKiN is to examine the individual consequences of family complexity for intergenerational relations, intergenerational reproduction, and individual health...
Article
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This paper examines whether the simultaneous occurrence of two or more adverse life course transitions has a stronger effect on mental health compared to the effects of the sum of each. The focus is on four life course transitions (partner loss (divorce/separation or death), death of a parent, unemployment, disability) and the data come from a larg...
Article
Objectives: The concept of guilt is often mentioned in studies on intergenerational ambivalence but its theoretical status in that literature is not clear and the concept is rarely measured. The current study examines how feelings of guilt that adult children have toward their ageing mothers are related to intergenerational ambivalence and support...
Article
Generally, adult children are perceived to have obligations to support their parents, but now that divorce and remarriage are common phenomena, the question arises to which parent-figures this norm applies. We derive hypotheses on normative obligations towards step-parents and biological parents and the role of co-residential history and divorce. F...
Article
The hypothesis of secondary traumatization argues that children raised by parents who were traumatized by war, have more mental health problems than other children. Past evidence for this hypothesis is not consistent. This paper re-examines the hypothesis by analyzing a large nationally representative survey of adult children in the Netherlands in...
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The general assumption in past research on coupled retirement is that men and women prefer joint retirement. The current study tests this assumption and hypothesizes that preferences to retire jointly are associated with (a) the work and relationship attachment of both members of the couple, and (b) the respective spouse’s preferences. The results...
Article
How does the death of a parent affect the adult sibling relationship? Different theoretical perspectives suggest different outcomes. A solidarity perspective implies mostly positive effects on the sibling tie. In this perspective, the death of a parent is a major life event which increases the need for family support. A structural perspective impli...
Article
The positive link between marriage and health has frequently been analyzed and typically been interpreted in terms of health protection. Recently, the benefits of marriage have been criticized by sociologists who emphasize the strength of single persons in societies where being single is fully institutionalized. This paper reviews the evidence and...
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Full-text available
This study used data on couples from the 2003 Spanish Time Use Survey (N = 1,416) to analyze how work schedules are associated with family, couple, parent-child, and non-family leisure activities. Spain is clearly an interesting case for the institutionalized split-shift schedule, a long lunch break rooted in the traditional siesta that splits the...
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Theoretical models of the divorce process suggest that marital breakup is more painful in the presence of children, yet little is known about the role of children as a moderator of divorce effects on adult well-being. The present study addresses this gap of research based on long-term panel data from Germany (SOEP). Following individuals over sever...
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Resource dilution theory hypothesizes that children’s educational attainment suffers from being raised with many siblings, as the parental resources have to be shared with more children. Based on economic and cultural theories, we hypothesize that resource dilution is gendered: especially a larger number of brothers is harmful to a person’s educati...
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Full-text available
In this study, we examine whether there is a well-being gap between persons in same-sex and mixed-sex unions. We consider the possible role that tolerance of homosexuality plays in the size of this gap by comparing these union types across nine European countries with varying levels of normative and legal tolerance (informal and formal institutiona...
Article
Data on secondary school children in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden show that large differences exist in family structure within the minority population: In some groups, father absence is more common than among natives; in others, it is less common. These patterns reflect the differences in family structure in the origin countries, b...
Article
Contact between children and divorced fathers is often believed to strengthen the negative effect of interparental postdivorce conflict on children's well-being. Although this is a well-known hypothesis, there is surprisingly little evidence for it. This article examines the hypothesis using large-scale nationally representative data on secondary s...
Article
This study examines the relation between the proportion of co-ethnics in school and adolescents’ problem behaviour in school (e.g. skipping class and arguing with teachers) and whether friendship patterns are underlying this relationship. We use data from the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Survey in Four European Countries on ±16,000 students...
Article
This article tests the thesis that intermarriage fosters the integration of immigrants by studying the children of intermarriage. Using secondary school–based questionnaire data from England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden, I compare the children of mixed marriages to second-generation immigrants and to children of native origins. Three dimen...
Article
Recent studies have argued that grandparents have a direct effect on grandchildren's achievements, net of parental resources. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. One explanation is that grandchildren can benefit from the cultural resources that grandparents transmit to their grandchildren. If this is the case, one would expect...
Article
Using nationally representative data on secondary school children in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden, this study describes the relationships that children have with their fathers after divorce. Differences in the post-divorce relationship are explained in terms of demographic factors, socioeconomic factors, and contextual differences...
Article
How do children's life course transitions affect the well-being of their parents? Using a large panel survey among parents with longitudinal information on 2 randomly chosen children, the authors analyzed the effects of children's union formation, parenthood, and union dissolution on changes in depressive symptoms of parents. Negative effects were...
Article
A common claim in the literature is that higher-educated persons are more likely to marry outside their ethnic/racial group than lower-educated persons. We re-examine this "educational gradient" with a multilevel analysis of 46 immigrant groups in the Current Population Survey. We find that there are positive effects not only of individual educatio...
Article
Why do adult children support their parents and how can we explain differences among children in this respect? Similarly, why do people support their adult children and why are some parents more supportive than others? In this paper, an overview is given of three explanations of intergenerational support: a theory about exchange, a theory about alt...
Article
Assessing perceived relationship quality of family relations. The role of value similarity examined from a multi-actor perspective. It has often been claimed a positive relationship exists between value similarity and relationship quality. To assess the validity of this claim Heckman regression models were conducted using data from the Netherlands...
Article
Several studies have examined the impact of earlier children on fertility decisions in second unions. These studies are guided by two hypotheses: the parenthood hypothesis, which argues that people want to have children to become a parent, and the commitment hypothesis, which argues that people want to have children to confirm the union. Because pe...
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Full-text available
Immigrants’ destination-language proficiency has been typically studied from a microperspective in a single country. In this article, the authors examine the role of macrofactors in a cross-national perspective. They argue that three groups of macrolevel factors are important: the country immigrants settle in (“destination” effect), the sending nat...
Article
This study presents descriptive and explanatory analyses of contact between former spouses, using data on 1,791 previously married men and women in the Netherlands. The authors employ a typology of relationships between former spouses, differentiating between friendly contact, antagonistic contact, and no contact. Ten years after divorce, still alm...
Article
Disagreement exists about the relationship between divorce and social integration. A liberation hypothesis predicts an increase in integration, however, an isolation hypothesis predicts a decrease in integration. We combine these hypotheses by specifying that liberation will occur for some dimensions of integration, whereas isolation will occur for...
Article
This article addresses questions about the influences of task specialization and assortative mating on divorce in the Netherlands. Two hypotheses are tested. The first hypothesis is derived from microeconomic theorizing on marriage and argues that a traditional division of labor in marriage reduces the probability of divorce. The second hypothesis...
Article
Though men and women now achieve similar level of schooling, the types of fields they study still vary widely. Men are overrepresented in technical and economic fields, whereas women are overrepresented in socio-cultural and service fields. In this paper, we examine to what extent the type of field people study affects their earnings, and we try to...
Article
Though men and women now achieve similar levels of schooling, the types of fields they study still vary widely. Men are overrepresented in technical and economic fields, whereas women ate overrepresented in socio-cultutal and service fields. In this paper, we examine to what extent the type of held people study affects their earnings, and we try to...
Article
Several authors have examined whether black Caribbean immigrants are more successful in the American economy than African Americans. This study examines the earnings and occupations of Caribbean American men in the 1990 census and expands previous analyses by examining generational differences within this new black minority Central findings suggest...
Article
This study examines two micro-level hypotheses about status homogamy: (1) the cultural matching hypothesis (people prefer to marry someone of similar cultural status) and (2) the economic competition hypothesis (people prefer to marry someone of high economic status). Detailed occupations of newlyweds in the 1970 and 1980 censuses are analyzed. Sca...

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