Matthias Wienroth

Matthias Wienroth
Northumbria University · School of Arts and Social Sciences

MA, PhD

About

42
Publications
9,851
Reads
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460
Citations
Citations since 2016
28 Research Items
423 Citations
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Introduction
Matthias Wienroth currently works at the Centre for Crime and Policing, Northumbria University, and is Visiting Fellow at the Policy, Ethics and Life Sciences Research Centre, Newcastle University, UK.
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - present
Newcastle University
Position
  • Research Associate
June 2017 - July 2019
Newcastle University
Position
  • Research Associate
January 2017 - May 2017
King's College London
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (42)
Book
Full-text available
This collection reviews developments in DNA profiling across jurisdictions with a focus on scientific and technological advancement as well as the political and socio-legal impact. Written by leading scholars in the fields of Social Studies of Forensic Science, Science and Technology Studies and Socio-Legal Studies the book provides state-of-the-ar...
Article
Full-text available
Forensic genetics comes under critical scrutiny when developments challenge previously accepted legal, ethical, social, and other boundaries. Forensic geneticists continue to build a knowledge culture within a community of practice that acknowledges ethical standards of conduct in both research and the societal application of forensic genetics. As...
Article
Full-text available
Greater scrutiny and demands for innovation and increased productivity place pressures on scientists. Forensic genetics is advancing at a rapid pace but can only do so responsibly, usefully, and acceptably within ethical and legal boundaries. We argue that such boundaries require that forensic scientists embrace ‘ethics as lived practice’. As a sta...
Article
Analysis of how papers and databases are handled and interpreted shows that geneticists in Europe must stamp out unethical research practices at home, not just abroad. Analysis of how papers and databases are handled and interpreted shows that geneticists in Europe must stamp out unethical research practices at home, not just abroad.
Article
Full-text available
This paper analyses promissory discourse for genome editing and human health in the UK, attending to the articulation of public goods and their beneficiary publics. Focusing on promissory reasoning about an emerging technology field as anticipatory and ethical considerations as integral to such debates, the notion of ethical regime as a mode of gov...
Article
My perspective piece contributes to social studies of biometric technologies, and to studies on values and valuation within debates of responsible innovation. I reflect on innovation as social practice where values are temporary settlements of considerations around validity, operability, and social compatibility of socio-technical innovations. As s...
Article
Full-text available
Background: In the past decade, Lynn Etheredge presented a vision for the Learning Health System (LHS) as an opportunity for increasing the value of health care via rapid learning from data and immediate translation to practice and policy. An LHS is defined in the literature as a system that seeks to continuously generate and apply evidence, innova...
Article
Full-text available
DNA profiling and databasing technologies have become integral to criminal justice practices in many countries, and their reliability is now rarely challenged. However, a new set of forensic genetics technologies has emerged, one of which is forensic DNA phenotyping (FDP). FDP aims to infer a person’s visible traits from DNA, and to predict biogeog...
Article
In recent years, assistive technologies have gained acceptance as tools for supporting chronically ill patients in achieving improvements in physical activity. However, various healthcare and sociological studies show contradicting results regarding the physical and social impact of using such devices. This paper explores real‐time user appropriati...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Just over a decade has passed since Lynn Etheredge presented a vision for the Learning Health System (LHS) as an opportunity for increasing value of health care via rapid learning from data, and immediate translation to practice and policy. OBJECTIVE In the current review, the authors examined themes in literature and rhetoric on the LH...
Article
Full-text available
Background: In the past decade, Lynn Etheredge presented a vision for the Learning Health System (LHS) as an opportunity for increasing the value of health care via rapid learning from data and immediate translation to practice and policy. An LHS is defined in the literature as a system that seeks to continuously generate and apply evidence, innov...
Article
Full-text available
Between December 2012 and September 2013 the United Kingdom government oversaw one of the largest destructions of a collection of human-derived samples ever conducted. Approximately 7,753,000 DNA samples and 1,766,000 DNA computerized profiles associated with the UK's policing National DNA Database (NDNAD) were destroyed or deleted. This paper cons...
Article
Zusammenfassung Durch eine Gesetzesänderung im Dezember 2019 ist im Rahmen von Strafermittlungsverfahren nunmehr der Einsatz des „Forensic DNA Phenotyping“, d. h. von Technologien zur Vorhersage von Haut-, Haar- und Augenfarbe sowie biologischem Alter, erlaubt. Dieser Beitrag diskutiert die Verlässlichkeit, Nützlichkeit und Legitimität von solchen...
Article
The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) aims to improve national ‘health and wealth' by providing infrastructural support to enable clinical research in National Health Service settings in England and Wales. Cognisant of the consequences of studies' failure to achieve required numbers of participants, it also actively campaigns to promote...
Article
Full-text available
Ein Essay desGenetikers David Reich, erschienen am 23. März in der New York Times, löste eine heftige internationale Diskussion aus. Der Text mit dem Titel „How Genetics Is Changing Our Understanding of ‚Race‘“ (Wie die Genforschung unserVerständnis von„Rasse“ verändert) erntete sowohl Kritik als auch Zustimmung, auf die Reich in einem zweiten Arti...
Article
Forensic geneticists have attempted to make the case for continued investment in forensic genetics research, despite its seemingly consolidated evidentiary role in criminal justice, by shifting the focus to technologies that can provide intelligence. Forensic DNA phenotyping (FDP) is one such emerging set of techniques, promising to infer external...
Article
Full-text available
Background: UK Hospital Trusts are charged with increasing patients' research awareness and willingness to take part in research. This includes implementing strategies to encourage patient-initiated enquiries about participation. Objectives: To evaluate the impact of a research statement inserted in outpatient letters in one clinical service, an...
Article
Full-text available
This review describes the social and ethical responses to the history of innovations in forensic genetics and their application to criminal investigations. Following an outline of the three recurrent social perspectives that have informed these responses (crime management, due process, and genetic surveillance), it goes on to introduce the repertoi...
Research
Full-text available
This is a public guide to DNA in criminal investigations which provides widely accessible information on the capacities and limitations of current and some emerging DNA technologies used in criminal justice.
Article
In this paper we bring together thoughts and experiences of employing facilitation towards creative emancipation in art-science based on our experiences of working on an art-science project. We suggest that this space is a trading zone in which novel links and relationships can be created. We introduce the notion of ‘boundary method’ to describe fa...
Article
Full-text available
Die Anwendung von DNA-Technologien in der Ermittlungsarbeit ist weder einfach noch trivial. Wer eine Ausweitung der polizeilichen Möglichkeiten in diesem Bereich fordert, sollte zunächst die Komplexität dieser Ermittlungsinstrumente zur Kenntnis nehmen: Sie birgt rechtliche, ethische und soziale Risiken, die jeden einzelnen Bürger treffen können. D...
Article
Full-text available
In a recent special issue of the journal on new trends in forensic genetics, Manfred Kayser contributed a review of developments, opportunities and challenges of forensic DNA phenotyping (FDP). In his article he argues that FDP technologies—such as determining eye, hair and skin color—should be considered as akin to a "biological witness" with the...
Article
Full-text available
This paper discusses the nature of four waves of technological innovations in forensic genetics alongside the social, legal and ethical aspect of these innovations. It emphasises the way in which technological advances and their socio-legal frameworks are co-produced, shaping technology expectations, social identities, and legal institutions. It al...
Book
The areas of personal genomics and citizen science draw on - and bring together - different cultures of producing and managing knowledge and meaning. They also cross local and global boundaries, are subjects and objects of transformation and mobility of research practices, evaluation and multi-stakeholder groups. Thirdly, they draw on logics of 'co...
Article
Full-text available
Hip implants have provided life-changing treatment, reducing pain and improving the mobility and independence of patients. Success has encouraged manufacturers to innovate and amend designs, engendering patient hopes in these devices. However, failures of medical implants do occur. The failure rate of the Articular Surface Replacement metal-on-meta...
Article
Full-text available
ATRIA was an immersive sound installation that was the result of a dynamic, reflective dialogue between artist Deborah Robinson and biologist Simon Rundle during Robinson's residency within the Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre, Plymouth University. The work drew on theoretical ideas in developmental biology and the sociology of science an...
Chapter
The privacy concerns discussed in the 1990s in relation to the New Genetics failed to anticipate the relevant issues for individuals, families, geneticists and society. Consumers, for example, can now buy their personal genetic information and share it online. The challenges facing genetic privacy have evolved as new biotechnologies have developed,...
Article
Full-text available
This paper locates the use of DNA profiling within the contemporary disaster response apparatus as an instance of a historically contingent biometric identity regime. It considers why and how DNA profiling and profile matching, first developed to support criminal justice aims, have been adopted for disaster victim identification. The increasingly o...
Chapter
This chapter examines several related non-medical contexts in which genotyping is carried out and where questions arise over who has the right to commission, deploy and share with whom the results of that genotyping. There are three such contexts on which we focus attention. The first - and dominant one - is the applicatin of genetic technologies t...
Book
Today, nanoscience and emerging technologies weave ever more tightly into the social fabric. Scientific and technological innovations at the infinitesimal depths of matter now entail cultural, political, and philosophical ramifications of extraordinary scope, extending from the molecular scale to the global scale, from the physical entanglements of...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years questions concerning the impact of public research funding have become the preeminent site at which struggles over the meanings and value of science are played out. In this paper we explore the ‘politics of impact’ in contemporary UK science and research policy and, in particular, detail the ways in which UK research councils have r...
Article
Full-text available
Fortpflanzung und Familie sind zentrale Bestandteile im Leben von Menschen. Mit der Entwicklung von immer erfolgreicheren Reproduktionstechnologien sind fundamentale Fragen des Lebens verbunden: Was bedeutet es, sich fortzupflanzen, Kinder zu haben oder Mensch zu sein? Die Reproduktionsmedizin und deren ethische Reflexion beeinflussen das Verständn...
Article
Full-text available
Reproduction and the family are central elements in the lives of people, and in the narratives and practices of diverse cultures and societies. In the development of ever more powerful techniques of assisted reproduction a number of questions have emerged. They lie at the heart of what it means to reproduce, to be a parent, to be a human being. Rep...
Article
Full-text available
Nanotechnology has emerged in the UK on the back of two key discourses that have driven the governance of the field: the knowledge-based economy and the risk debate. These two discourses have been articulated on pre-existing national structures, leading to the lack of a central national nanotechnology strategy. Instead, a range of intermediary acto...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
In many European countries race is a taboo subject. Due to colonialism and WWII, studying race is delegated to the realm of ‘bad science’ or declared irrelevant all together. Yet, current biomedicine and forensic practices are co-shaped by techniques that depend on and explore differences between human populations. In the process, these techniques reintroduce and shape race in both science and society. But this is not done upfront. In Europe race has become an absent presence, an object that pops up, e.g. in discourse to then hide in seemingly unproblematic techniques, e.g. in genetic markers. The RaceFaceID research project seeks to open up for study this double move, in which ‘race’ gets configured but not discussed. The RaceFaceID project is an ethnographic study of race in forensic identification, in which the focus is on practices of giving a face to an unknown individual, a suspect or a victim. Although the face is generally viewed as the ultimate individual identifier, in practice individuality cannot be achieved without situating an individual in a population (M’charek 2000). Rather than defining race, we follow the relation between the individual and the population in practice and attend to instances in which this relation is translated, and wherein population comes to stand for race. The chief objective of the RaceFaceID project is to explore a) how technologies of identification rely on and reiterate racial ways of understanding differences; b) how the version of race enacted in the process changes as knowledge travels across forensic sites; and c) which mechanisms contribute to the absent-presentness of race. We study three different technologies of identifications through in-depth multi-sited ethnographies (Marcus 1995): (1) the frontier science of genetic facial phenotying (e.g. the inference of facial form, hair, skin and iris colour from DNA); (2) the established technologies of craniofacial reconstruction (facial reconstruction based on the skull); and (3) the classical facial composite (either based on sketching or computerised photofit). We therein examine how knowledge travels from forensic laboratories to courtrooms, also from the forensic laboratories to so-called Research and Development sites. Guiding the RaceFaceID project is the overarching question: How is race enacted in forensic practices? A series of sub-questions will address the answer: a) How do various technologies of identification in- and outside the laboratory enact race? b) How do versions of race change as they move between practices? c) What mechanisms work to make race an absent presence? d) What concepts are apt to theoretically grasp the name- and shape-changing nature of race? The project aims to develop a theoretical and methodological framework for studying race-in-practice. The framework is aimed at advancing our knowledge about the ways race is enacted through and materializes in technologies. It thus aims at advancing our understanding of the materiality of race in practice, not by reducing race to biology or the body, but by tracing ethnographically how race is configured as specific relations between the biological, the social and the technical. The project also aims to shed light on how the traffic of knowledge between sites implies that race is translated and made relevant in a variety of ways. To date, studies into racial configurations have concentrated on scientific settings (laboratory or clinic) or on sites where the sciences are marginal. This project will move beyond this by following the trajectory along which knowledge and technology move across diverse sites, in and out of the laboratory. It will detail how versions of race are enacted and the socio-technical relations that need to be in place to do that. Finally, it aims to advance social science by studying race as an absent presence, an object that tends to hide in seemingly unproblematic categories or in the technologies and routines of science. We will not focus on discourses (indeed the word ‘race’ often remains unspoken) but on practices and meticulously examine how race, even if not articulated, is still enacted and embedded in ways of working and in technologies. Studying race in forensic practice today is highly relevant, since forensics constitutes one of the major domains where science and society interact.
Project
This project discusses technologies and databases used for the prediction of externally visible characteristics (EVCs) and the so-called biogeographical ancestry (BGA).