Matthias Sinnesael

Matthias Sinnesael
Observatoire de Paris · Institut de Mecanique Celeste et de Calcul des Ephemerides (IMCCE)

About

52
Publications
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408
Citations
Citations since 2016
52 Research Items
401 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120

Publications

Publications (52)
Article
Full-text available
Variations in elemental abundances in carbonate archives offer a wealth of information that can be used as proxy for palaeoenvironment and diagenetic history. State of the art portable handheld X-ray Fluorescence (pXRF) and laboratory micro X-ray Fluorescence (µXRF) instruments provide a relatively inexpensive, fast and non-destructive way of acqui...
Article
Full-text available
Accurately deciphering periodic variations in paleoclimate proxy signals is essential for cyclostratigraphy. Classical spectral analysis often relies on methods based on (fast) Fourier transformation. This technique has no unique solution separating variations in amplitude and frequency. This characteristic can make it difficult to correctly interp...
Chapter
We studied a high-resolution multiproxy data set, including magnetic susceptibil- ity (MS), CaCO3 content, and stable isotopes (δ18O and δ13C), from the stratigraphic interval covering the uppermost Maastrichtian and the lower Danian, represented by the pelagic limestones of the Scaglia Rossa Formation continuously exposed in the clas- sic sections...
Article
Full-text available
Cyclostratigraphy is an important tool for understanding astronomical climate forcing and reconstructing geological time in sedimentary sequences, provided that an imprint of insolation variations caused by Earth's orbital eccentricity, obliquity and precession is preserved (Milankovitch forcing). Understanding astronomical climate forcing has prov...
Article
Full-text available
The end-Triassic extinction event (~ 201.5 Ma) is one of the five major mass extinction events in Earth's history, however, considerable discussion continues on the exact causes and timing of the event. This is because, whilst certain geochemical data on T-J sections appears to be largely comparable globally, with for example a significant (up to 6...
Article
Full-text available
The mid-Maastrichtian carbon isotope event (MME), dated at~69 Ma, reflects a perturbation of the global carbon cycle that, in part, correlates with the enigmatic global extinction of 'true' (i.e., non-tegulated) inoceramid bivalves. The mechanisms of this extinction event are still debated. While both the inoceramid extirpation and MME have been re...
Article
Full-text available
To expand traditional cyclostratigraphic numerical methods beyond their common technical limitations and apply them to truly deep-time archives, we need to reflect on the development of new approaches to sedimentary archives that are not traditionally targeted for cyclostratigraphic analysis but that frequently occur in the impoverished deep-time r...
Article
Full-text available
The youngest time interval of the Cretaceous Period is known as the Maastrichtian, in reference to the shallow-marine strata outcropping in the area surrounding the city of Maastricht, in the Netherlands- Belgium border region. While the type-Maastrichtian strata have yielded a wealth of paleontological data, comparatively little geochemical work h...
Preprint
Full-text available
To expand traditional cyclostratigraphic numerical methods beyond their common technical limitations and apply them to truly deep-time archives we need to reflect on the development of new approaches to sedimentary archives that traditionally are not targeted for cyclostratigraphic analysis, but that frequently occur in the impoverished deep-time r...
Research
Full-text available
Supplementary materials to article: Wouters, Sébastien, Michel Crucifix, Matthias Sinnesael, Anne-Christine Da Silva, Christian Zeeden, Miroslav Zivanovic, Frédéric Boulvain, et Xavier Devleeschouwer. 2022. « A Decomposition Approach to Cyclostratigraphic Signal Processing ». Earth-Science Reviews 225 (103894). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2...
Article
Sedimentary rocks can record signals produced by highly complex processes. These signals are generated by a progressive deposition of sediments which can be affected, mainly through the climate system, by regular astronomical cycles (i.e. Milankovitch cycles), and by irregular oscillations like the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Also, usually throug...
Article
Full-text available
Paleozoic astrochronologies are limited by uncertainties in past astronomical configurations and the availability of complete stratigraphic sections with precise, independent age control. We show it is possible to reconstruct a robust Paleozoic ~104-yr-resolution astrochronology in the well-preserved and thick Upper Ordovician reference record of A...
Article
Full-text available
Limestone–marl alternations (LMA) are commonly used for high‐resolution cyclostratigraphic studies and palaeoenvironmental reconstructions, but diagenetic studies indicate not all limestone–marl alternations reflect genuine differences in the initial sediment composition driven by environmental changes. Differences in the ratios of diagenetically i...
Article
Full-text available
The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction is marked globally by elevated concentrations of iridium, emplaced by a hypervelocity impact event 66 million years ago. Here, we report new data from four independent laboratories that reveal a positive iridium anomaly within the peak-ring sequence of the Chicxulub impact structure, in drill core rec...
Article
Full-text available
The Devonian Frasnian–Famennian (F–F) boundary marks one of the five main extinction intervals of the Phanerozoic Aeon. This time was characterized by two pulses of oceanic anoxia, named the Lower and Upper Kellwasser events, during which massive marine biodiversity losses occurred. This paper presents high-resolution magnetic susceptibility, X-ray...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Borehole logging data are not yet systematically assessed using cyclostratigraphic methods. In order to obtain a reliable understanding of (long) borehole logging datasets, and especially data from complex settings, a good understanding of the potential and specifics of relevant (time/depth) evolutive methods in cyclostratigraphy are an essential p...
Article
The storm-dominated, open marine neritic carbonate facies, continuously exposed in coastal cliffs and wide rocky tidal flat exposures at the western end of Anticosti Island, form a 315-m-thick, expanded section spanning the Ordovician-Silurian boundary. These carbonate facies display deepening-shallowing trends of different orders, resulting in a h...
Article
Full-text available
This study presents subdaily resolved chemical records through fossil mollusk shell calcite. Trace element profiles resolve periodic variability across ~40‐μm‐thin daily growth laminae in a Campanian Torreites sanchezi rudist bivalve. These high‐resolution records are combined with seasonally resolved stable isotope and trace element records that a...
Article
Full-text available
Fast-growing speleothems allow for the reconstruction of palaeoclimate down to a seasonal scale. Additionally, annual lamination in some of these speleothems yields highly accurate age models for these palaeoclimate records, making these speleothems valuable archives for terrestrial climate. In this study, an annually laminated stalagmite from the...
Article
Variations of trace element (e.g. Mg, Sr, Ba, Fe, Zn etc.) concentrations along a speleothem's growth axis constitute important paleoclimate proxies. The use of laboratory micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry as a fast and cheap alternative for conventional mass spectrometry techniques for trace element analysis on speleothems has been explored in...
Article
Full-text available
Cyclostratigraphy is an important tool for understanding astronomical climate forcing and reading geological time in sedimentary sequences, provided that an imprint of insolation variations caused by Earth’s orbital eccentricity, obliquity and/or precession is preserved (Milankovitch forcing). Numerous stratigraphic and paleoclimate studies have ap...
Article
Full-text available
Continental rift systems are often characterized by geothermal activity and associated discharge of hot groundwater, which can substantially impact the water, solute and sediment budgets of rift-valley lakes. Hot-spring inflow can result in complex lake hydro- and geochemistry, but also buffers against the desiccation of closed-basin lakes in dry c...
Article
Full-text available
Annually laminated speleothems allow the reconstruction of paleoclimate down to a seasonal scale. In this study, an annually laminated stalagmite from the Han-sur-Lesse Cave (Belgium) is used to study the expression of the seasonal cycle in northwestern Europe during the Little Ice Age. More specifically, two historical 12-year-long growth periods...
Presentation
Full-text available
To establish an astronomical time scale, it is useful to perform a visual inspection of the lithological evolution, together with proxies record. It allows to have a clear understanding of the expression of Milankovitch cyclicity. However, performing such an inspection can be challenging due to the large amount of data and high spatial resolution r...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cyclostratigraphy is an integral part of many scientific studies on the age and duration of outcrop-and core material from sedimentary geoarchives. Yet, borehole data are not systematically assessed using cyclostratigraphic methods. This has various reasons, including (a) a specific resolution and commonly no possibility to increase data resolution...
Conference Paper
IDENTIFYING PRECESSION AND OBLIQUITY CYCLES IN THE ORDOVICIAN? SINNESAEL, Matthias, Department of Geology, Ghent University, Ghent, 9000, Belgium; Analytical Environmental and Geo-Chemistry (AMGC), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, 1050, Belgium, DESROCHERS, André, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, O...
Article
Cyclostratigraphic analyses rely on techniques that trace astronomical components in paleoclimate signals. These techniques have demonstrated their value but rely on certain assumptions on the presence and quality of the astronomical imprint. Here we explore a new conceptual approach to time series analysis. Specifically, we evaluate the potential...
Article
Pelagic carbonate sections constitute common archives for paleoclimatological and stratigraphical research. This study evaluates the use of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) measurements on pelagic carbonates and applies the method to the well-studied latest Maastrichtian in the Bottaccione Gorge section from Gubbio, Italy. A calibration with carb...
Article
Full-text available
The Late Devonian envelops one of Earth’s big five mass extinction events at the Frasnian–Famennian boundary (374 Ma). Environmental change across the extinction severely affected Devonian reef-builders, besides many other forms of marine life. Yet, cause-and-effect chains leading to the extinction remain poorly constrained as Late Devonian stratig...
Article
The discovery of elevated concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclide ^3He in deep-sea sediments from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 926 (Atlantic Ocean) and ODP Site 757 (Indian Ocean) points toward accretion of extraterrestrial matter, probably as a result of the catastrophic disruption of a large asteroid that produced the Veritas family of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The study of astronomical climate forcing and the application of cyclostratigraphy have experienced a spectacular growth over the last decades. In the field of cyclostratigraphy a broad range in methodological approaches exist. However, comparative study between the different approaches is lacking. Different cases demand different approaches, but w...
Poster
Full-text available
The objective of this project is to investigate and quantify reproducibility of cyclostratigraphic studies and to provide a platform to discuss the merits and pitfalls of different methodologies, and their applicability. The project will be structured around several “test scenarios”, which are signals to be analyzed by participants that feature sta...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Middle to lower Upper Ordovician sections of the Crozon Peninsula area (Postolonnec Formation, Armorican Massif, western France) show multi-order eustatic sea-level changes (Dabard et al., 2015). The sections are characterized by siliciclastic facies, which were deposited in tidal to storm-dominated shelf environments. Dabard et al. (2015) anal...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Worldwide, the youngest time interval of the Cretaceous Period is known as the Maastrichtian, a reference to the rock layers exposed in the area surrounding the city of Maastricht, in the Netherlands-Belgium border region. We owe this international reference to the instrumental work of Belgian geologist André Hubert Dumont, who, in 1849, first described the rock layers in the valley of the Meuse River, close to the present-day ENCI quarry. Consequently, the rock sequence in the ENCI quarry constitutes the original type-locality of the Maastrichtian, the reference site for this geological stage, and as such it plays an important role in worldwide geological research, for instance in the debate about the extinction of the dinosaurs, ammonites and other organisms at the end of the Cretaceous, 66 million years ago. The Maastrichtian rocks are also world famous for their large number of excavated mosasaur skeletons, huge reptiles that were the top predators of the Maastrichtian seas. The rock succession in the ENCI quarry only covers the upper part of the currently defined Maastrichtian Stage, but in combination with similar rock sequences in several other quarries in the area around Maastricht in the Netherlands and Belgium, nearly the entire Maastrichtian Stage is represented. Despite the importance of the rocks exposed around Maastricht to the global geological community, over the last few decades, one by one the quarries in the region have been closed. Instrumental quarries such as those of Curfs and Blom have already been out of commission for more than a decade, while others, such as the ENCI quarry and the ’t Rooth quarry are scheduled to close within the next few years. Because the soft limestone rocks weather easily and become overgrown rapidly , access to and study of the Maastrichtian rock succession in its type area is becoming very limited. To preserve the geological heritage of this original type-locality of the Maastrichtian, we have initiated the ‘Maastrichtian Geoheritage Project’. The goal of the ‘Maastrichtian Geoheritage Project’ is to preserve the geological heritage of the Maastrichtian type area by (1) digital imagery, using drone photogrammetry and Differential GPS Base & Rover to generate high-resolution and georeferenced 3D models of the most important quarries in the Maastrichtian type region; (2) archiving rock samples of these quarries for future research; and to (3) to raise public awareness, in particular amongst the region inhabitants, of the history of the mining and cement industry in the region and its impact on the landscape, as well as of its unique geological treasures, and the contribution of these quarries to international geological and paleontological research.
Project
EARTHTIME is an international community initiative that seeks to accelerate the development and application of integrated methods for the quantification of geological time. The EARTHTIME mission: To accelerate the development and application of integrated methodologies for the quantification geological of time for the underpinning of Earth sciences.
Project
The objective of this project is to investigate and quantify reproducibility of cyclostratigraphic studies and to provide a platform to discuss the merits and pitfalls of different methodologies, and their applicability.