Matthias Schleuning

Matthias Schleuning
Senckenberg Biodiversität und Klima - Forschungszentrum | BiK-F · BiK-F

PD Dr.

About

181
Publications
78,867
Reads
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6,392
Citations
Citations since 2016
121 Research Items
5656 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,0001,200
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,0001,200
Additional affiliations
January 2015 - present
July 2010 - December 2014
July 2009 - June 2010
Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (181)
Article
Full-text available
Species interactions can propagate disturbances across space via direct and indirect effects, potentially connecting species at a global scale. However, ecological and biogeographic boundaries may mitigate this spread by demarcating the limits of ecological networks. We tested whether large-scale ecological boundaries (ecoregions and biomes) and hu...
Article
1. Traits mediate mutualistic and antagonistic interactions between plants and animals, and should thus be useful for predicting trophic species interactions. Studies to date have examined the importance of morphological trait matching for plant‐animal interactions, but have rarely explored the extent to which these interactions are shaped by match...
Article
Abstract Biotic interactions in plant communities affect individual fitness and community dynamics. Interactions between plants vary in space, over time and with organisational complexity. Yet it is challenging to quantify temporal, spatial and functional determinants of different types of interactions between long‐lived perennial plant species and...
Article
Full-text available
The diversity of traits within animal assemblages has been shown to affect the magnitude of animal‐provided ecological functions. However, little is known about how consistent trait diversity effects are across ecological functions and ecosystems. More importantly, the importance of trait diversity in driving ecosystem functioning, relative to othe...
Article
Full-text available
Bird-mediated seed dispersal is crucial for the regeneration and viability of ecosystems, often resulting in complex mutualistic species networks. Yet, how this mutualism drives the evolution of seed dispersing birds is still poorly understood. In the present study we combine whole genome re-sequencing analyses and morphometric data to assess the e...
Article
Full-text available
Aim How species respond to climate change is influenced by their sensitivity to climatic conditions (i.e. their climatic niche) and aspects of their adaptive capacity (e.g. their dispersal ability and ecological niche). To date, it is largely unknown whether and how species’ sensitivity to climate change and their adaptive capacity covary. However,...
Article
1. Research on resource partitioning in plant‐pollinator mutualistic systems is mainly concentrated at the levels of species and communities, whereas differences between males and females are typically ignored. Nevertheless, pollinators often show large sexual differences in behaviour and morphology, which may lead to sex‐specific patterns of resou...
Article
The framework of the plant economics spectrum advanced our understanding of plant ecology and proved as a unifying concept across plant taxonomy, growth forms and biomes. Similar approaches for animals mostly focus on linking life‐history and metabolic theory, but not on their application in ecosystem research. To fill this gap, we propose the anim...
Article
Full-text available
Species interactions are influenced by the trait structure of local multi‐trophic communities. However, it remains unclear whether mutualistic interactions in particular can drive trait patterns at the global scale, where climatic constraints and biogeographic processes gain importance. Here we evaluate global relationships between traits of frugiv...
Data
Supporting information for: Ian McFadden, Susanne Fritz, Niklaus Zimmermann, Loïc Pellissier, Daniel Kissling, Joseph Tobias, Matthias Schleuning, Catherine Graham. 2022. Global plant-frugivore trait matching is shaped by climate and biogeographic history. Ecology Letters, 25:686-696
Data
From Dryad: Modified from: McFadden et al. Global plant-frugivore trait matching is shaped by climate and biogeographic history. 2022. Ecology Letters To assemble this dataset of trait measurements for avian frugivores, we compiled a dataset of beak measurements taken from wild-caught and released individuals, as well as specimens accessed in num...
Article
Full-text available
The monitoring of species and functional diversity is of increasing relevance for the development of strategies for the conservation and management of biodiversity. Therefore, reliable estimates of the performance of monitoring techniques across taxa become important. Using a unique dataset, this study investigates the potential of airborne LiDAR-d...
Article
Full-text available
The study of ecological networks has progressively evolved from a mostly descriptive science to one that attempts to elucidate the processes governing the emerging structure of multitrophic communities. To move forward, we propose a conceptual framework using trait-based inference of ecological processes to improve our understanding of network asse...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change causes shifts in species ranges globally. Terrestrial plant species often lag behind temperature shifts, and it is unclear to what extent animal‐dispersed plants can track climate change. Here, we estimate the ability of bird‐dispersed plant species to track future temperature change on a tropical mountain. Tropical elevational gradi...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity and ecosystem functions are highly threatened by global change. It has been proposed that geodiversity can be used as an easy-to-measure surrogate of biodiversity to guide conservation management. However, so far, there is mixed evidence to what extent geodiversity can predict biodiversity and ecosystem functions at the regional scale...
Article
Full-text available
The study of ecological networks has progressively evolved from a mostly descriptive science to one that attempts to elucidate the processes governing the emerging structure of multitrophic communities. To move forward, we propose a conceptual framework using trait-based inference of ecological processes to improve our understanding of network asse...
Preprint
Full-text available
Species interactions are influenced by the trait structure of local multi-trophic communities. However, it remains unclear whether mutualistic interactions in particular can drive trait patterns at the global scale, where climatic constraints and biogeographic processes gain importance. Here we evaluate global relationships between traits of frugiv...
Article
Full-text available
Aim The identification of the mechanisms determining spatial variation in biological diversity along elevational gradients is a central objective in ecology and biogeography. Here, we disentangle the direct and indirect effects of abiotic drivers (climatic conditions, and land use) and biotic drivers (vegetation structure and food resources) on fun...
Article
Full-text available
Many experiments have shown that biodiversity enhances ecosystem functioning. However, we have little understanding of how environmental heterogeneity shapes the effect of diversity on ecosystem functioning and to what extent this diversity effect is mediated by variation in species richness or species turnover. This knowledge is crucial to scaling...
Article
Given the current challenges of global change, e.g., through increasing temperatures and changes in habitat quality, it is essential to gain a better understanding of how species are linked to the conditions of their environment. Bats and birds fulfill crucial ecosystem functions as highly mobile long-distance seed dispersers, pollinators, and inse...
Preprint
Full-text available
Species interactions can propagate disturbances across space, though ecological and biogeographic boundaries may limit this spread. We tested whether large-scale ecological boundaries (ecoregions and biomes) and human disturbance gradients increase dissimilarity among ecological networks, while accounting for background spatial and elevational effe...
Article
Species differ in their resource use and their interactions with other species and, consequently, they fulfil different functional roles in ecological processes. Species with specialized functional roles (specialists) are considered important for communities because they often interact with species with which few other species interact, thereby con...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical mountain ecosystems are threatened by climate and land-use changes. Their diversity and complexity make projections how they respond to environmental changes challenging. A suitable way are trait-based approaches, by distinguishing between response traits that determine the resistance of species to environmental changes and effect traits t...
Article
Full-text available
Functional traits can determine pairwise species interactions, such as those between plants and pollinators. However, the effects of biogeography and evolutionary history on trait‐matching and trait‐mediated resource specialization remain poorly understood. We compiled a database of 93 mutualistic hummingbird‐plant networks (including 181 hummingbi...
Cover Page
Full-text available
The cover image is based on the Research Article: High levels of phenological asynchrony between specialized pollinators and plants with short flowering phases by Maglianesi et al. (2020), https://doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3162. Species phenology plays a key role in determining mutualist interactions, such as those between plants and pollinators, and spe...
Article
Species phenology plays a key role in determining mutualistic interactions, such as those between plants and pollinators. Notably, temporal synchrony shapes the patterns of interactions by influencing the probability of encounters between interacting partners; thus, species phenology greatly contributes to structuring ecological communities. In the...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Although patterns of biodiversity across the globe are well studied, there is still a controversial debate about the underlying mechanisms and their generality across biogeographic scales. In particular, it is unclear to what extent diversity patterns along environmental gradients are directly driven by abiotic factors, such as climate, or ind...
Article
Network approaches provide insight into the complex web of interspecific interactions that structure ecological communities. However, because data on the functional outcomes of ecological networks are very rarely available, the effect of network structure on ecosystem functions, such as seed dispersal, is largely unknown. Here, we develop a new app...
Article
Full-text available
Plant recruitment is a multi-stage process determining population dynamics and species distributions. Still, we have limited understanding of how the successive demographic processes depend on the environmental context across species’ distributional ranges. We conducted a large-scale transplant experiment to study recruitment of Pinus cembra over s...
Article
Full-text available
In pollination systems with a diverse community of floral visitors, qualitative and quantitative variations in pollination effectiveness can lead to a system in which higher effectiveness results from the synergetic contribution of multiple pollinators. By employing a series of field and laboratory experiments in the south Andes of Ecuador, we comp...
Article
Full-text available
In pollination systems with a diverse community of floral visitors, qualitative and quantitative variations in pollination effectiveness can lead to a system in which higher effectiveness results from the synergetic contribution of multiple pollinators. By employing a series of field and laboratory experiments in the south Andes of Ecuador, we comp...
Article
Anthropogenic disturbances are jeopardizing ecosystem functioning globally. Yet we know very little about the effect of human impacts on ecological processes derived from trophic interactions. By focusing on biodiversity components of consumer and resource organisms, such as the diversity of phylogenetic lineages and the diversity of traits that in...
Article
Full-text available
Downsizing of animal communities due to defaunation is prevalent in many ecosystems. Yet, we know little about its consequences for ecosystem functions such as seed dispersal. Here, we use eight seed-dispersal networks sampled across the Andes and simulate how downsizing of avian frugivores impacts structural network robustness and seed dispersal....
Article
Full-text available
Interactions between species are influenced by different ecological mechanisms, such as morphological matching, phenological overlap and species abundances. How these mechanisms explain interaction frequencies across environmental gradients remains poorly understood. Consequently, we also know little about the mechanisms that drive the geographical...
Article
The species composition of local communities varies in space, and its similarity generally decreases with increasing geographic distance between communities, a phenomenon known as distance decay in similarity. It is, however, not known how changes in local species composition affect ecological processes, that is, whether they lead to differences in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Network approaches provide insight into the complex web of interspecific interactions that structure ecological communities. However, because data on the functional outcomes of ecological networks are very rarely available, the effect of network structure on ecosystem functions, such as seed dispersal, is largely unknown. Here, we develop a new app...
Article
Plant-animal interactions are fundamentally important in ecosystems, but have often been ignored by studies of climate-change impacts on biodiversity. Here, we present a trait-based framework for predicting the responses of interacting plants and animals to climate change. We distinguish three pathways along which climate change can impact interact...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change forces many species to move their ranges to higher latitudes or elevations. Resulting immigration or emigration of species might lead to functional changes, e.g., in the trait distribution and composition of ecological assemblages. Here, we combined approaches from biogeography (species distribution models; SDMs) and community ecolog...
Article
Full-text available
1. Ecologists have long suspected that species are more likely to interact if their traits match in a particular way. For example, a pollination interaction may be more likely if the proportions of a bee's tongue fit a plant's flower shape. Empirical estimates of the importance of trait-matching for determining species interactions, however, vary s...
Article
Full-text available
Human land use threatens global biodiversity and compromises multiple ecosystem functions critical to food production. Whether crop yield–related ecosystem services can be maintained by a few dominant species or rely on high richness remains unclear. Using a global database from 89 studies (with 1475 locations), we partition the relative importance...
Article
Full-text available
Human land use threatens global biodiversity and compromises multiple ecosystem functions critical to food production. Whether crop yield–related ecosystem services can be maintained by a few dominant species or rely on high richness remains unclear. Using a global database from 89 studies (with 1475 locations), we partition the relative importance...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Species in ecological communities are linked by biotic interactions. It is therefore important to simultaneously study the impacts of global warming on interdependent taxa from different trophic levels. Here, we quantify current and potential future associations of functional diversity (based on multiple traits) and functional identity (based o...
Preprint
Ecologists have long suspected that species are more likely to interact if their traits match in a particular way. For example, a pollination interaction may be particularly likely if the proportions of a bee's tongue match flower shape in a beneficial way. Empirical evidence for trait matching, however, varies significantly in strength among diffe...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies have investigated how habitat fragmentation affects the taxonomic and functional diversity of species assemblages. However, the joint effects of habitat fragmentation and environmental conditions on taxonomic and functional diversity, for instance across elevational gradients, have largely been neglected so far. In this study, we compa...
Article
Full-text available
Agriculture and the exploitation of natural resources have transformed tropical mountain ecosystems across the world, and the consequences of these transformations for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning are largely unknown1–3. Conclusions that are derived from studies in non-mountainous areas are not suitable for predicting the effects of land-...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human land use threatens global biodiversity and compromises multiple ecosystem functions critical to food production. Whether crop yield-related ecosystem services can be maintained by few abundant species or rely on high richness remains unclear. Using a global database from 89 crop systems, we partition the relative importance of abundance and s...
Article
Full-text available
Aim It is not yet clear whether similar mechanisms influence the assembly of ecological communities across different continents. Here, we investigated the functional and phylogenetic diversity of bird assemblages along elevational gradients in two biogeographic regions in order to identify how these are driven by biotic factors, such as food resour...
Article
Full-text available
Seed dispersal is an important ecosystem function, but it is contentious how structural and functional diversity of plant and bird communities are associated with seed-dispersal functions. We used structural equation models to test how structural (i.e., abundance, species richness) and functional diversity (i.e., functional dispersion and community...
Article
Front cover: The cover image of an Emerald toucanet (Aulacorhynchus prasinus) in El Bosque' Reserve, San Pedro de Vilcabamba, Ecuador is based on the Original Article Functional and phylogenetic diversity of bird assemblages are filtered by different biotic factors on tropical mountains by Dagmar M. Hanz et al., DOI: 10.1111/jbi.13489. Photo Credit...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Biogeographical comparisons of interaction networks help to elucidate differences in ecological communities and ecosystem functioning at large scales. Neotropical ecosystems have higher diversity and a different composition of frugivores and fleshy‐fruited plants compared with Afrotropical systems, but a lack of intercontinental comparisons lim...
Article
1.Partner choice in species interaction networks, e.g. between frugivorous birds and fruiting plants, is largely determined by matching of functional traits. However, the composition of functional traits in plant communities changes along land‐use gradients. Understanding how flexible consumers react to changes in the trait composition of resources...