Matthew Ware

Matthew Ware
Florida State University | FSU · Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science

PhD in Biological Oceanography

About

18
Publications
4,230
Reads
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171
Citations
Introduction
As a coastal ecologist within the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science at Florida State University and member of the FSU Marine Turtle Research, Ecology, and Conservation Group, I'm interested in the interactions between humans and coastal/nearshore ecosystems. My PhD research studied the effects of our beach- and species management actions on the incubating environment of sea turtles in the northern Gulf of Mexico. This included nest relocation and "Leave No Trace" ordinances using GIS, remote sensing, wave modeling, and in situ monitoring approaches. My past research and other interests includes coral reef restoration, population modeling, drone-based aerial surveys, and emerging camera technologies.
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - May 2019
Florida State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • EVR 1001: Introduction to Environmental Science Online and in-house Lab and lecture
Education
January 2016 - May 2019
Florida State University
Field of study
  • Biological Oceanography
August 2012 - July 2015
Nova Southeastern University
Field of study
  • Marine Biology and Marine Environmental Science
August 2008 - May 2012
Christopher Newport University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Population size estimates are key parameters used in assessments to evaluate and determine a species' conservation status. Typically, sea turtle population estimates are made from nesting beach surveys which capture only hatchling and adult female life stages and can display trends opposite of the full population. As such, in-water studies are crit...
Article
Full-text available
Population size estimates are key parameters used in assessments to evaluate and determine a species' conservation status. Typically, sea turtle population estimates are made from nesting beach surveys which capture only hatchling and adult female life stages and can display trends opposite of the full population. As such, in-water studies are crit...
Article
Full-text available
Wave wash-over poses a significant threat to sea turtle nests, with sustained exposure to waves potentially resulting in embryonic mortality and altered hatchling locomotor function, size, and sex ratios. Identifying where and under what conditions wave exposure becomes a problem, and deciding what action(s) to take (if any), is a common issue for...
Article
Management of imperiled species facing spatiotemporally dynamic threats is difficult. Systems thinking can inform their management by quantifying the impacts that they face. We apply systems thinking to the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGM) loggerhead (Caretta caretta) Recovery Unit (RU), one of the smallest subpopulations of loggerheads nesting in the...
Article
Full-text available
Point 1: Stereo-video camera systems (SVCSs) are a promising tool to remotely measure body size of wild animals without the need for animal handling. Here, we assessed the accuracy of SVCSs for measuring straight carapace length (SCL) of sea turtles. Point 2: To achieve this, we hand captured and measured 63 juvenile, subadult, and adult sea turtle...
Article
Sea turtles and boating activities often occur in shared waters. This is problematic because sea turtles are susceptible to vessel strikes since they spend significant portions of their lives in nearshore shallow water to breathe, reproduce, and feed. Targeted conservation strategies are needed to reduce vessel strikes on sea turtles, and successfu...
Article
Full-text available
Sea turtles migrate thousands of miles annually between foraging and breeding areas, carrying dozens of epibiont species with them on their journeys. Most sea turtle epibiont studies have focused on large-sized organisms, those visible to the naked eye. Here, we report previously undocumented levels of epibiont abundance and biodiversity for logger...
Article
Full-text available
Significant population declines in Acropora cervicornis and A. palmata began in the 1970s and now exceed over 90%. The losses were caused by a combination of coral disease and bleaching, with possible contributions from other stressors, including pollution and predation. Reproduction in the wild by fragment regeneration and sexual recruitment is in...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal environments provide critical ecosystem services but experience a number of threats including marine debris and abandoned beach equipment. To address this threat, municipalities have begun enacting policy measures such as Leave No Trace ordinances. The impact of these ordinances on coastal species management has not yet been established. To...
Article
Full-text available
Named storms can cause substantial impacts on the habitat and reproductive output of threatened species, such as marine turtles. To determine the impacts of named storms on marine turtles and inform management, it is necessary to determine the exposure of marine turtle nesting grounds to recent storm activities. To address this, remote sensing info...
Technical Report
Targeted conservation interventions (elements of conservation strategies or plans) are needed to reduce sea turtle vessel strikes in the southern Florida area. These must be determined in a way that include various data sets and perspectives in order to integrate the complex conservation and human dimensions-related issues implicated in boat strike...
Article
The inundation of foreshore and backshore coastal environments caused by wave runup or groundwater intrusion can be extremely detrimental for beach-dwelling organisms. For beach-nesting species, whose eggs require sufficient gas exchange with the surrounding environment for proper embryonic development, inundation for prolonged periods can result i...
Article
Sea turtle nest relocation is a management strategy commonly used to mitigate hatchling mortality, particularly that due to wave wash-over and tidal groundwater inundation. Relocation can alter the incubation environment, so there is concern regarding potential modifications to embryonic development. Several studies have explored the effects of rel...
Article
Full-text available
Sea turtle research has received substantial focus worldwide. However, research on the immature life stages of sea turtles is still relatively limited. The latter is of particular importance, given that a large proportion of sea turtle populations comprises immature individuals. We set out to identify knowledge gaps in immature sea turtle research,...
Article
Sea turtle eggs are at risk of inundation and erosion throughout their incubation. Inundation reduces gas exchange necessary for proper embryonic development with prolonged exposure resulting in mortality. Management actions such as nest relocation may reduce this threat; however, they are often undertaken with incomplete information (e.g., toleran...
Thesis
Full-text available
Over the last 40 years, the Caribbean has lost half of its live coral cover, mostly in the form of Acropora cervicornis and A. palmata, due to disease, bleaching from rising water temperatures, and other stressors. To help restore these corals to reefs in Florida, the Coral Restoration Foundation (CRF) created nearshore nurseries and transplanted o...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Despite spending the vast majority of their lives at sea, relatively little is known about sea turtle behavior, habitat preferences, population demographics, and threat exposure compared to their terrestrial activities. This project is an accumulation of work seeking to inform these information gaps, including through the use of novel technologies and modeling approaches.
Archived project
Nurseries hold high potential for supplying needed material for reef-scale coral reef restoration. However, long-term monitoring of these transplants is rarely conducted. This project aims to determine growth and survival parameters of outplanted nursery-raised staghorn coral (Acropora cervicornis) using photogrametric analysis and in situ experimentation.
Project
Determine the embryonic development and population-level implications of episodic inundation to incubating sea turtle nests and improve species management decisions using in situ monitoring and wave run-up modeling.