Matthew Walls

Matthew Walls
The University of Calgary | HBI · Anthropology and Archaeology

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19
Publications
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Publications

Publications (19)
Article
In the lowlands and uplands of Central Europe, which were inhabited continuously from the very start of the Holocene to the present times, it is difficult to find territories suitable for investigation of natural baselines. For this reason, we picked the complicated rocky terrain of one upland area in NE Bohemia called Adrspach because, based on th...
Chapter
In Bohemia (western part of Czech Republic), known Mesolithic sites are located in a variety of landscape zones and natural settings. The extent of research on each of these landscapes and understandings of the relationships between them are quite variable. In this paper, we compare selected case studies from three different Bohemian landscape type...
Article
Full-text available
In a continuous, perfectly stratified sedimentary sequence which was discovered under a large sandstone overhang in northern Bohemia, Czech Republic, we analysed multiple biological remains, archaeological features and artefacts. This multi-proxy record has allowed us to examine the interactions between woodland and humans in a permanently wooded e...
Article
In the High Arctic, recent acceleration of geomorphological processes is having extreme impact on archaeological landscapes. In this paper, we consider implication for circumpolar archaeology, and focus analysis on a study area of critical importance to the local Inughuit community at Siorapaluk – a small settlement in Northwest Greenland. Using a...
Article
The purpose of this paper is to explore research frameworks for understanding the relationship between northern communities and environmental change, which present an alternative to the currently prevailing concept of resilience. We contribute to a growing literature that identifies a chief problem with resilience thinking— that despite much discus...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, I draw on postphenomenology and material engagement theory to consider the material and emergent character of sociality in Homo faber. I approach this through the context of the bow and arrow, which is a technology that has received recent attention in cognitive archeology as a proxy for assessing criteria that made early human cogni...
Article
6 Part article in Greenlandic language about the Morris Bay Kayak
Article
In this paper, we present results from a project to reanalyze the Morris Bay Kayak, which was discovered by Lauge Koch in Washington Land, northwest Greenland in 1921. This reanalysis is significant because the role of kayak hunting in Inughuit origins, development, and cultural transitions is poorly understood. Indeed, the subject is complicated b...
Chapter
Although fundamental to learning and making, the notion of creativity in university culture often implies an internalized and reflective cognitive process, resulting in something judged to be unique or even useful. This perspective is under challenge within anthropology, where there have been calls to see creativity as a situated, ordinary, and cen...
Article
This report re-examines the Morris Bay Kayak, which was discovered in Washington Land, Northwest Greenland in 1921. Kayaks rarely preserve archaeologically, and the find is especially significant because the closest Inuit group, the Inughuit, were thought to have lost the technology sometime before the nineteenth century. In this context, radiocarb...
Article
The chaîne opératoire is one of the most powerful tools that archaeologists can use to link artifacts and people through the physicality of skilled movement. In many applications, interpretations developed through the use of the chaîne opératoire are based on the idea that patterned gestures are guided by a representational or schematic knowledge t...
Article
Inuit kayaks are a hunting technology that requires a high degree of developed skill to operate. The practice involves special types of physical fitness, technical ability, social relationships and extensive environmental knowledge. Hunters must be able to work intuitively as a team, to recognize and react instantly to subtle environmental cues, an...
Article
Although the natural availability and quality of wood is variable across the Arctic, there is great continuity in how it was traditionally used. This article considers the value of wood to Arctic peoples and the criteria that would distinguish the utility of different pieces. The topic is explored in the case of kayak construction, one of the most...
Article
Inuit Elders from the West Coast of Hudson Bay, Canada remember the past to serve the present. This paper describes a mapping and oral history project that is gathering Elders' knowledge of the people, places, sites, and resources that populated their vast traditional territory. We discuss the Elders' conception of this work within the framework of...
Article
Full-text available
Visibility studies in archaeology have been criticized because they tend to emphasize the importance of vision over other senses. The burgeoning field of sensory anthropology argues that the relative significance of visual, olfactory, acoustic and haptic (touch) senses varies cross-culturally, and is a function of how human beings interact with the...

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