• Home
  • Matthew Gwynfryn Thomas
Matthew Gwynfryn Thomas

Matthew Gwynfryn Thomas
British Red Cross · Insight and Improvement

BSc, MSc, PhD

About

18
Publications
3,226
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
100
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2016 - present
Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2016 - present
Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU)
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2012 - March 2014
University College London
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Taught Human Behavioural Ecology to 2nd year undergraduates and statistics to Masters students.
Education
January 2012 - January 2016
University College London
Field of study
  • Anthropology
October 2010 - July 2011
University College London
Field of study
  • Anthropology
October 2001 - June 2004
University of Southampton
Field of study
  • Computer Science

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Dwelling fires are attributable to the high public health burden of injury and mortality in England. The statistic shows that from 2010 to 2019, over 5,000 injuries and 200 deaths annually are caused by dwelling fires which accounts for around three-fourths of the total fire-related casualties. Therefore, it is necessary to explore the social risk...
Article
Aim System leadership is the requirement for a leader of a single organisation to operate on behalf of a wider system, rather than their individual organisation. The current policy landscape does not incentivise system leadership, as many national structures emphasise a focus on individual organisations. This study aims to understand how chief exec...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim: System leadership is the requirement for a leader of a single organisation to operate on behalf of a wider system, rather than their individual organisation. It is not clear to what extent the current policy landscape supports leaders in managing misalignment between the needs of their organisation and the wider system, as many national struct...
Article
Full-text available
Human children are frequently cared for by non-parental caregivers (alloparents), yet few studies have conducted systematic alternative hypothesis tests of why alloparents help. Here we explore whether predictions from kin selection, reciprocity, learning-to-mother and costly signalling hypotheses explain non-parental childcare among Agta hunter-ga...
Article
Full-text available
Pastoralists rely on networks of cooperating households containing relatives and others to help with production and various other daily activities. To understand how socioecological differences and commonalities affect different social networks, we compared cooperative decision-making using gift games for 755 people working in herding groups across...
Article
Full-text available
The relative importance of social evolution theories such as kin selection, direct reciprocity and need-based transfers in explaining real-world cooperation is the source of much debate. Previous field studies of cooperation in human communities have revealed variability in the extent to which each of these theories explains human sociality in diff...
Article
Full-text available
Cooperation evolves on social networks and is shaped, in part, by norms: beliefs and expectations about the behaviour of others or of oneself. Networks of cooperative social partners and associated norms are vital for pastoralists, such as Saami reindeer herders in northern Norway. However, little is known quantitatively about how norms structure p...
Data
Supplementary Information for ‘The narrow gap between norms and cooperative behaviour in a reindeer herding community‘
Article
Full-text available
Anthropologists have long argued that fear of victimization through witchcraft accusations promotes cooperation in small-scale societies1. Others have argued that witchcraft beliefs undermine trust and therefore reduce social cohesion2. However, there are very few, if any, quantified empirical examples demonstrating how witchcraft labels can struct...
Article
Full-text available
Many social interactions create a tension between individual and collective interests, known as social dilemmas. Pastoralists, whose livelihoods depend on cooperation within and between herding groups, face a range of social dilemmas in their daily lives. Evolutionary theory predicts that social dilemmas will be solved (i.e. individuals will cooper...
Article
Full-text available
Cooperative behaviors evolve by ultimately increasing the inclusive fitness of performers as well as recipients of those behaviors. Such increases can occur via direct or indirect fitness benefits, theoretically explained by reciprocal altruism and kin selection, respectively. However, humans are known for cooperating with individuals who are not n...
Article
Full-text available
Human reproductive patterns have been well studied but the mechanisms by which physiology, ecology and existing kin interact to affect the life history need quantification. Here, we create a model to investigate how age-specific interbirth intervals adapt to environmental and intrinsic mortality, and how birth patterns can be shaped by competition...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cooperative behaviours must ultimately increase the inclusive fitness of actors as well as recipients in order to evolve. At the proximate level, mechanisms for encouraging and maintaining cooperation include kin discrimination, limited dispersal as well as direct and indirect reciprocity, among others. Here, we aim to quantify the relative importa...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Humans lengthen their birth intervals with age and stop reproducing halfway through life. Despite this, human populations have rapidly expanded, even in high-mortality environments. Using a state-dependent dynamic model, we investigated how reproductive schedules adapt to mortality risk. Optimal pace of reproduction slows as siblings intensify comp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Across all cultures, people marry, disperse and reproduce. When these behaviours occur is, in part, determined by social norms and local ecological conditions. Which sex tends to leave their natal group and which sex stays emerges in a similar fashion. A consequence of sex-biased dispersal is that relatedness to one’s local group changes over time....

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The scope of this study is to define first the notion of human ecosystem as dependent on territories and/or system of networks, then to characterize the ecosystemic crisis by factors, dynamics and outputs and finally identify a frame of pragmatic approaches for specific responses.