Matthew L. Richardson

Matthew L. Richardson
University of California, Irvine | UCI · Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery

PhD

About

11
Publications
1,626
Reads
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50
Citations
Citations since 2017
10 Research Items
50 Citations
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Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
To obtain combined behavioural and electrophysiological measures of pitch perception, we presented harmonic complexes, bandpass filtered to contain only high-numbered harmonics, to normal-hearing listeners. These stimuli resemble bandlimited pulse trains and convey pitch using a purely temporal code. A core set of conditions consisted of six stimul...
Article
Full-text available
We describe a scalp-recorded measure of tonotopic selectivity, the "cortical onset response" (COR) and compare the results between humans and cats. The COR results, in turn, were compared with psychophysical masked-detection thresholds obtained using similar stimuli and obtained from both species. The COR consisted of averaged responses elicited by...
Article
Full-text available
Cochlear implant (CI) users show limited sensitivity to the temporal pitch conveyed by electric stimulation, contributing to impaired perception of music and of speech in noise. Neurophysiological studies in cats suggest that this limitation is due, in part, to poor transmission of the temporal fine structure (TFS) by the brainstem pathways that ar...
Article
Full-text available
Animal studies have discovered that noise, even at levels that produce no permanent threshold shift, may cause cochlear damage and selective nerve degeneration. A hallmark of such damage, or synaptopathy, is recovered threshold but reduced suprathreshold amplitude for the auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave I. The objective of the present study...
Article
While noninvasive brain stimulation is convenient and cost effective, its utility is limited by the substantial distance between scalp electrodes and their intended neural targets in the head. The tympanic membrane, or eardrum, is a thin flap of skin deep in an orifice of the head that may serve as a port for improved efficiency of noninvasive stim...
Preprint
Full-text available
Rationale Electrophysiological studies show that nicotine enhances neural responses to characteristic frequency stimuli. Previous behavioral studies partially corroborate these findings in young adults, showing that nicotine selectively enhances auditory processing in difficult listening conditions. The present work extended previous work to includ...
Article
Full-text available
Tinnitus is a sound heard by 15% of the general population in the absence of any external sound. Because external sounds can sometimes mask tinnitus, tinnitus is assumed to affect the perception of external sounds, leading to hypotheses such as "tinnitus filling in the temporal gap"in animal models and "tinnitus inducing hearing difficulty"in human...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Electric stimulation is used to treat a number of neurologic disorders such as epilepsy and depression. However, delivering the required current to far-field neural targets is often ineffective because of current spread through low-impedance pathways. Here, the specific aims are to develop an empirical measure for current passing throu...
Article
Full-text available
Noninvasive transcranial electric stimulation is increasingly being used as an advantageous therapy alternative that may activate deep tissues while avoiding drug side-effects. However, not only is there limited evidence for activation of deep tissues by transcranial electric stimulation, its evoked human sensation is understudied and often dismiss...
Article
Full-text available
Noninvasive transcranial or minimally invasive transtympanic electric stimulation may offer a desirable treatment option for tinnitus because it can activate the deafferented auditory nerve fibers while posing little to no risk to hearing. Here, we built a flexible research interface to generate and control accurately charge-balanced current stimul...
Article
Full-text available
The effect of intensity on the effective bandwidth of auditory temporal processing is investigated. Thresholds for detecting sinusoidal amplitude-modulation of a 200-Hz wide band of noise centered at 1000 Hz are measured in the presence of a notched noise masker. The masker consists of two, 200-Hz wide, unmodulated bands of noise placed at frequenc...

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