Matthew Rampley

Matthew Rampley
Masaryk University | MUNI · Art History

Bachelor of Arts; PhD

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89
Publications
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (89)
Article
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Recent years have seen a notable growth of interest in the operations of affect and agency in art. Works of art are said to have agency, primarily through their impact on the affectivity of the spectator. This turn is an inflection of a wider phenomenon in the humanities, motivated by interest in the theory of affect. Although it has only recently...
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A book review of Christopher Wood, 'A History of Art History'. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2019. 459 pp. ISBN 978-0-691-15652-1.
Book
This important critical study of the history of public art museums in Austria-Hungary explores their place in the wider history of European museums and collecting, their role as public institutions, and their involvement in the complex cultural politics of the Habsburg Empire. Focusing on institutions in Vienna, Cracow, Prague, Zagreb, and Budapest...
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This article examines the work of the Austrian architect Clemens Holzmeister. A leading representative of Austrian architecture between the wars, and a significant figure in the i95os and i96os as teacher of the new generation of Austrian architects including Hans Hollein and Gustav Peichl, Holzmeister presents a perplexing image. In the i920s, he...
Book
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Liberalism, Nationalism and Design Reform in the Habsburg Empire is a study of museums of design and applied arts in Austria-Hungary from 1864 to 1914. The Museum for Art and Industry (now the Museum of Applied Arts) as well as its design school occupies a prominent place in the study. The book also gives equal attention to museums of design and a...
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This review offers a critical summary of Bredekamp’s Image Acts. Identifying Bredekamp’s theory of the image act as an attempt to provide a general Warburg theory of the image, it argues that despite the impressively wide-ranging and ambitious scope of the study, it is theoretically undetermined. Agency is a central term, but the book lacks a theor...
Article
Galleries and museums were key to the development of the public sphere in nineteenth-century Europe and America; museums of design and applied arts had an additional mission, namely, to promote economic competitiveness by improving the quality of design. This story is well known in relation to museums in London, Vienna, Berlin, and Paris. But what...
Article
Taylor Jeffrey . In Search of the Budapest Secession: The Artist Proletariat and Modernism's Rise in the Hungarian Art Market, 1800–1914. St. Helena, CA: Helena History Press, 2014. Pp. 260 + 107 b/w illus. - Volume 48 - Matthew Rampley
Research
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This is a review of John Onians’s study European Art: A Neuroarthistory. It argues that the project of neuroarthistory relies on fundamental methodological misconceptions and a simplistic understanding of neuroscience.
Article
T he artistic and cultural life of A ustria after World War I has often been presented in a gloomy light. As one contributor to a recent multivolume history of Austrian art commented, “the era between the two world wars is for long periods a time of indecision and fragmentation, of stagnation and loss of orientation … the 20 years of the First Repu...
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The standard narrative of the Vienna school of art history has cast its authors as cosmopolitan, progressive, and aesthetically liberal. Few have focused on the interrelation of the Vienna school and the cultural politics of Austria-Hungary. An exploration of the school's engagement with the Hapsburg Empire's cosmopolitan ideology of “unity in dive...
Book
Matthew Rampley’s The Vienna School of Art History is the first book in over seventy-five years to study in depth and in context the practices of art history from 1847, the year the first teaching position in the discipline was created, to 1918, the collapse of Austria-Hungary. It traces the emergence of art history as a discipline, the establishme...
Book
Reflection on the history and practice of art history has long been a major topic of research and scholarship, and this volume builds on this tradition by offering a critical survey of many of the major developments in the contemporary discipline, such as the impact of digital technologies, the rise of visual studies or new initiatives in conservat...
Book
The preservation of architectural monuments has played a key role in the formation of national identities from the nineteenth century to the present. The task of maintaining the collective memories and ideas of a shared heritage often focused on the historic built environment as the most visible sign of a link with the past. The meaning of such mon...
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At midday on Thursday, 1 May 1873, the Emperor Francis Joseph I officially opened the Fifth World's Fair in Vienna. Timed to coincide with the emperor's twenty-fifth anniversary, the fair aimed to confirm the status of Austria-Hungary as a major European power and as an advanced industrial and economic state. As the opening address of Archduke Karl...
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This essay examines the early history of the Vienna School of Art History. It focuses in particular on the role of Rudolf von Eitelberger in establishing the parameters of art-historical inquiry, and the ideological, social and political forces that shaped his ideas. It interprets Eitelberger and his contemporaries in the light of positivist defini...
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The Warburg method of a montage of images reflects his comprehension of culture as a space of memory, in which visual symbols (and not only) fulfil the function of a sui generis archive of contrasted reminiscences. In this aspect, his work can be compared to Benjamin's Passagenwerk, with Benjamin writing about the dialectic of that which is visible...
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This article considers Aby Warburg's political beliefs and the ways in which they informed his project of a cultural history of the image. It argues that as the member of a leading banking family in Hamburg, Warburg assimilated the social and political values of the German liberal bourgeoisie, which underpinned an ambivalent attitude towards his Je...
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This article considers debates over the cultural, economic and political role of design in late nineteenth-century Habsburg Austria through a critical examination of responses to the Museum of Art and Industry in Vienna. It examines the goals of the Museum, set against the socio-political matrix of Habsburg Central Europe and analyses competing vis...
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The work of Niklas Luhmann represents perhaps the last major body of social theory of the twentieth century. Beginning with Social Theory or Social Technology: What Does Systems Research Achieve? jointly published with Jürgen Habermas in 1971, Luhmann spent the following three decades up until his death in 1998 laying out the basis for a comprehens...
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This key text offers the most extensive outline of Aby Warburg's speculations about social memory, the origin of artistic expression and the psychological energies driving the history of European culture from classical antiquity onwards. According to Warburg, the conflicting responses to the legacy of classical antiquity directly informed the style...
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The problems presented by recognition of cultural difference and alterity have long been recognized as presenting substantial challenges to traditional assumptions about the scope and limits of art history. This article examines some of the arguments that have emerged in relation to this issue, focusing in particular on ways in which anthropology a...
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Art considered as a Social System. Observations on the Sociology of Niklas Luhmann This article examines the work of Niklas Luhmann, and in particular, his employment of systems theory to the sociology of art. His analysis of art as a social system offers powerful new ways of conceptualising artistic change through time, artistic autonomy, and the...
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The work of Max Dvořák has seldom enjoyed the acclaim accorded to that of his Viennese colleague Alois Riegl, or contemporaries such as Aby Warburg and Heinrich Wölfflin. This paper argues for a reconsideration of his work, in which his ‘art history as the history of ideas’ is seen both as a lens through which Dvořák conducted a sustained commentar...
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It has long been recognized that Aby Warburg played a central role, perhaps even he central role, in elevating the role of iconology in Art History. Having been traditionally regarded as an ancillary activity, iconological interpretation came to displace the concern with aesthetic form and style predominant in late nineteenth-century art historical...
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The work of Anselm Kiefer has often been regarded as problematic. Its fascination with Nazi history and German myth has been interpreted as reactionary political recidivism, and the coincidence of its rise to public prominence with a rightward shift in German politics only added to this suspicion. I argue that while Kiefer's work is problematic, it...
Book
The art historian Aby M. Warburg and the philosopher Walter Benjamin are widely respected as two of the most significant cultural theorists of the twentieth century. Their common interests in historiography, the function of collective memory, and the relation of modern society to earlier stages of human social existence, were important examples of...
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This paper argues for a reevaluation of Aby Warburg by attending to the theoretical concerns underpinning his study of the Renaissance. It argues that Warburg's oeuvre has an overarching perspective, namely, an engagement with the emergence of specifically "modern" culture based on rationalization and the "disenchantment" of nature. This suggests p...
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This paper argues for a reevaluation of Aby Warburg by attending to the theoretical concerns underpinning his study of the Renaissance. It argues that Warburg's oeuvre has an overarching perspective, namely, an engagement with the emergence of specifically “modern” culture based on rationalization and the “disenchantment” of nature. This suggests p...
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Since the renewal of critical interest in the intellectual origins of Art History, a growing body of scholarship has emerged within the last 30 or so years focusing on the writings of Alois Riegl.2 Yet while the importance of Riegl has been recognized, a significant problem nevertheless remains, namely, that of deciding how to approach the texts in...
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L'A. examine l'enracinement de la pensee du langage de Heidegger, telle qu'elle se conceptualise dans «Etre et Temps» a travers les notions de discours, bavardage, ce-qui-est-dit-dans la parole et ce-qui-est-exprime, dans ses oeuvres anterieures a «Etre et Temps» concernant la logique et la signification chez Duns Scot, ainsi que les problemes de l...
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1. vyd. Část. přeloženo z angličtiny Širokému publiku čtenářů, studentům vizuálních umění, dějin umění, masových médií, architektury a designu

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Projects (3)
Project
When new political elites and social structures emerge out of a historical rupture, how are art and architecture affected? In 1918 the political map of Central Europe was redrawn as a result of the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, marking a new era for the region. The project examines the impact of this political discontinuity in three of Austria-Hungary’s successor states: Austria, Hungary and Czechoslovakia. The project focuses on the contradictory ways in which artists and architects in Central Europe adapted to and tried to shape the new socio-political circumstances in the light of the past.
Project
The project examines the history of museums from the mid-nineteenth century to the collapse of the Empire in 1918. It is concerned in particular with the ways in which displays of art and design in museum were used to promote messages about political, social and cultural identity. Museums played an important role in the formation of states in Europe in the nineteenth century, and in Austria-Hungary they became drawn into the ethnic conflicts that marked the final decades of its existence. Hence, the project looks at museums not only in Vienna but in the other important political and cultural centres of the Empire, such as Budapest, Prague, Cracow and Zagreb.