Matthew Pelowski

Matthew Pelowski
University of Vienna | UniWien · Fakultät für Psychologie

About

75
Publications
119,375
Reads
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1,393
Citations
Introduction
•••• Project Coordinator: Horizon2020 Framework Programme, SC6-TRANSFORMATIONS, Societal Challenges and the Arts. ARTIS (Art and Research on Transformations of Individuals and Society). •••• 2020 Berlyne Award for outstanding research by a junior scholar, APA Division 10, Society for the Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts. •••• 2016 Alexander Gottlieb Baumgarten Award for Outstanding Contributions of a Young Scientist, International Association of Empirical Aesthetics.
Additional affiliations
July 2015 - present
University of Vienna
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2014 - January 2015
University of Copenhagen
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2011 - December 2013
Nagoya University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (75)
Article
Full-text available
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating diagnosis with, however, potential for an extremely intriguing aesthetic component. Despite motor and cognitive deficits, an emerging collection of studies report a burst of visual artistic output and alterations in produced art in a subgroup of patients. This provides a unique window into the neurophysiolo...
Article
Full-text available
Sublime encounters provide a compelling example of the peaks of our shared emotional and cognitive experiences. For centuries, these have been a target for philosophy and, more recently, for psychology, with its renewed focus on profound or aesthetic events. The sublime has been theoretically connected to multiple contexts, from interactions with o...
Article
Full-text available
Teamwork is indispensable in human societies. However, due to the complexity of studying ecologically valid synchronous team actions, requiring multiple members and a range of subjective and objective measures, the mechanism underlying the impact of synchrony on team performance is still unclear. In this paper, we simultaneously measured groups of...
Article
Full-text available
Advertising plays a critical role in the commercial success of services and products. However, despite a long history of attempts to evaluate the efficacy of advertisements, actual objective, consistent means of assessing and antici- pating whether an advertisement might be effective and why it would be expected to translate to actual, desired purc...
Article
Full-text available
We present a unique opportunity to test the ability of artists to systematically evoke emotions in an audience via art and, transversely, for viewers to pick out intentions of the artist. This follows a recent article which had shown this connection using installation artworks by MFA student-artists. However, this earlier article had left open ques...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding consciousness is a major frontier in the natural sciences. However, given the nuanced and ambiguous sets of conditions regarding how and when consciousness appears to manifest, it is also one of the most elusive topics for investigation. In this context, we argue that research in empirical aesthetics—specifically on the experience of...
Article
Full-text available
When experienced in-person, engagement with art has been associated—in a growing body of evidence—with positive outcomes in wellbeing and mental health. This represents an exciting new field for psychology, curation, and health interventions, suggesting a widely-accessible, cost-effective, and non-pharmaceutical means of regulating factors such as...
Preprint
Full-text available
Embodied cognition claims that the way we move our body is central for experience. Exploring dimensions of bodily engagement should therefore also be central for understanding the experience of viewing and evaluating art. However, in both laboratory and in more ecologically-valid gallery studies, little attention has been paid to the actual ways vi...
Article
Full-text available
Art, as a prestigious cultural commodity, concerns aesthetic and monetary values, personal tastes, and social reputation in various social contexts-all of which are reflected in choices concerning our liking, or in other contexts, our actual willingness-to-pay for artworks. But, how do these different aspects interact in regard to the concept of so...
Article
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Digital images taken by mobile phones are the most frequent class of images created today. Due to their omnipresence and the many ways they are encountered, they require a specific focus in research. However, to date, there is no systematic compilation of the various factors that may determine our evaluations of such images, and thus no explanation...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, the authors report on how they joined in the exciting project to lay the theoretical foundations describing aesthetic experiences with artwork. Their 2017 paper was a culmination of meetings, later intense collaboration in Vienna’s empirical aesthetic research group, and the convergence of the models that the authors had independen...
Research Proposal
Full-text available
This review will consider all studies evaluating the effectiveness or efficacy of art viewing related to improving or supporting subjective wellbeing. The evaluation must be designed to include active art viewing, rather than just interventions that include proximity to art, i.e., the presence of art in a building or room without directly ensuring,...
Article
Full-text available
Consumer neuroscience—as a valuable complement to traditional, largely behavioral, research methods—is attracting increasing interest from researchers of marketing and consumer behavior. Although this field has made very important contributions, most consumer neuroscience studies to date have mainly focused on individuals' brain responses to simple...
Preprint
Full-text available
When experienced in-person, engagement with art has been associated—in a growing body of evidence—with positive outcomes in wellbeing and mental health. This represents an exciting new field for psychology, curation, and health interventions, suggesting a widely-accessible, cost-effective, and non-pharmaceutical means of regulating factors such as...
Article
Full-text available
Art making is a promising prism through which to appreciate the nuanced relationship between cognition, goal-directed behavior and the changing brain in the context of neurodegenerative diseases. As an area for future exploration, the value of art therapy as a potent behavioral and ultimately neurochemical, intervention has exciting potential.
Chapter
Full-text available
In most people’s lives, aesthetic experiences are probably frequent and occur in multiple, often very different and idiosyncratic situations. Usually, aesthetic experience involves an episode with the experiencing person in a specific situation, stretched out over time, in which certain objects, their environment, and various constituting elements...
Article
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A rather well-accepted finding from museum studies is that repeated art viewing may be tied to reduced attention towards art as individuals see more-and-more stimuli. This attention decrease from repeated art viewing appears to be a basic consequence of interaction with media. Considering lab-based studies in empirical and psychological aesthetics...
Article
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Most people encounter art images as digital reproductions on a computer screen instead of as originals in a museum or gallery. With the development of digital technologies, high- resolution artworks can be accessed anywhere and anytime by a large number of viewers. Since these digital images depict the same content and are attributed to the same ar...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter discusses the general impact of context on the aesthetic experience. It is de­ signed to anticipate the other chapters’ discussions of context’s specific areas—the so­ cial, the physical or institutional, information and framing, museums, background or per­ sonality-related features. Here, the authors offer a more general consideration...
Article
Studies have routinely shown that individuals spend more time spontaneously looking at people or at mimetic scenes that they subsequently judge to be more aesthetically appealing. This “beauty demands longer looks” phenomenon is typically explained by biological relevance, personal utility, or other survival factors, with visual attraction often dr...
Article
Full-text available
The paper got accepted to Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts in Febuary 2020. Pre-print can be found here: 10.2139/ssrn.3434578 NOTE: that this is therefore also a provisiory file and not the final typeset article.
Article
Full-text available
The idea that simple visual elements such as colors and lines have specific, universal associations—for example red being warm—appears rather intuitive. Such associations have formed a basis for the description of artworks since the 18th century and are still fundamental to discourses on art today. Art historians might describe a painting where red...
Article
Full-text available
We investigate the potential for modulations in art assessment, involving either "bottom-up" artwork-derived visual features or more overt "top-down" considerations based on personal history or taste. Such changes-whereby individuals might come to relatively increase or decrease their liking of the same works of art-have been suggested in recent ar...
Preprint
Full-text available
The paper got accepted to Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts in Febuary 2020. Pre-print can be found here; 10.2139/ssrn.3434578 NOTE: that this is therefore also a provisiory file and not the final typeset article.
Article
Full-text available
We report two studies considering the potential for gallery lighting conditions to modulate appraisals and emotional experience with works of visual art. As recently documented in a number of papers, art appreciation represents a complex blend of formal artwork factors, personalities and backgrounds of viewers, and multiple aspects of context regar...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies have reported that repetitive assembly line tasks—an omnipresent aspect of our modern technological and consumer life—may result in fatigue, which may diminish workers' performance, cognitive processing, attention, and physical and mental health. However, such tasks have rarely been investigated in ecologically-valid empirical sett...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a cross-disciplinary project based on an experiment in eye-tracking and motion capture (Sainsbury’s Centre for Visual Arts), which aimed to study viewers’ movements around an iconic sculpture: Edgar Degas’s Little Dancer Aged Fourteen. The experiment studies how viewers respond to this three-dimensional artwork not only by looki...
Article
Full-text available
Humans appear naturally inclined to both broadcasting and to perceiving each other’s emotional experiences. Especially in the area of empathy or emotion contagion, studies have routinely documented our ability to respond to others’ affective states, often via faces or bodies. This can occur on an intellectual level of perceiving emotion signs or ca...
Article
Full-text available
Being interested in art and having knowledge about art are arguably central dimensions in art experience and two of the most important individual differences when assessing how people process or respond to art. Nonetheless, there is to date no reliable and validated measurement of these dimensions. In this paper, we present the Vienna Art Interest...
Preprint
Full-text available
An outstanding question in empirical aesthetics concerns whether negative emotions (e.g., fear, disgust) can improve aesthetic judgments of liking. Although negative emotions are sometimes linked with enjoyment in music or visual design/art, emotion priming studies have shown conflicting results, reporting both more negative and more positive asses...
Article
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Installation art is one of the most important and provocative developments in the visual arts during the last half century and has become a key focus of artists and of contemporary museums. It is also seen as particularly challenging or even disliked by many viewers, and—due to its unique in situ, immersive setting—is equally regarded as difficult...
Article
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Drawing or otherwise making visual art is one of our most unique distinctions from other animals and acts as an empirical window into human perception, creativity, and thought. Despite its importance, art production has rarely been investigated in empirical studies, which have instead focused on realistic copying or comparison of those with differi...
Chapter
Recent developments in neuroaesthetics have heightened the need for causative approaches to more deeply understand the mechanism underlying perception, emotion, and aesthetic experiences. This has recently been the topic for empirical work, employing several causative methods for changing brain activity, as well as comparative assessments of indivi...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies have demonstrated that the neural basis of deception involves a network of regions including the medial frontal cortex (MFC), superior temporal sulcus (STS), temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), etc. However, to test the actual activity of the brain in the act of deceptive practice itself, existing studies have mainly adopted paradigms...
Article
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We connect the Distancing-Embracing model to theoretical and empirical evidence regarding empathy, which raises questions about the ordering and modulation of distancing in particular. Namely, distancing may not be a binary, continuously on/off process. Rather we suggest that changes in distancing as actualized via the relation between the individu...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, we review research on creativity with visual art, and, specifically, how this has been addressed within the psychology of art. We begin with a brief review of the history of psychology of art and the unique challenges associated with studying artistic creativity and expression. We then review current creativity studies that touch o...
Article
Full-text available
When an individual participates in empirical studies involving the visual arts, they most often are presented with a stream of images, shown on a computer, depicting reproductions of artworks by respected artists but which are often not known to the viewer. While art can of course be shown in presentia actuale-e.g., in the museum-this laboratory pa...
Article
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We review a relatively new method for studying the developing brain in children and infants with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Despite advances in behavioral screening and brain imaging, due to paradigms that do not easily allow for testing of awake, very young, and socially-engaged children—i.e., the social and the baby brain—the biological unde...
Article
Full-text available
We present a comprehensive review and theoretical discussion of factors that could impact our interaction with museum-based art. Art is an important stimulus that reveals core insights about human behavior and thought. Art perception is in fact often considered one of the few uniquely human phenomena whereby we process multiple types of information...
Article
Full-text available
Since the advent of the concept of empathy in the scientific literature, it has been hypothesized, although not necessarily empirically verified, that empathic processes are essential to aesthetic experiences of visual art. We tested how the ability to " feel into " (" Einfühlung ") emotional content—a central aspect of art empathy theories—affects...
Article
This paper has a rather audacious purpose: to present a comprehensive theory explaining, and further providing hypotheses for the empirical study of, the multiple ways by which people respond to art. Despite common agreement that interaction with art can be based on a compelling, and occasionally profound, psychological experience, the nature of th...
Article
We investigate neural and behavioral aspects of the interrelation between 'liking' and 'understanding' when both appraisals are made within one judgment task. Our goal was to explore questions regarding how these appraisals combine, and specifically whether there is an order-effect when both are employed in sequence. To this end, we tested a hypoth...
Article
Full-text available
We assess the impact of social and monetary contextual information on liking ratings of art. A group of art-naïve university students (N 187) was asked to rate a set of 90 paintings for liking, using a 7-point Likert-type scale. Before painting presentation, participants were primed either with information that a certain social group (fellow studen...
Article
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The last decade has witnessed a renaissance of empirical and psychological approaches to art study, especially regarding cognitive models of art processing experience. This new emphasis on modeling has often become the basis for our theoretical understanding of human interaction with art. Models also often define areas of focus and hypotheses for n...
Article
Birth registration and obtaining physical birth certificates impose major challenges in developing countries, with impact on child and community health, education, planning, and all levels of development. However despite initiatives, universal registration is elusive, leading to calls for new approaches to understanding the decisions of parents. In...
Conference Paper
We introduce ‘The interactive Audience Sensor Kit’ (TASK). This modular system of wirelessly networked sensors facilitates the augmentation of artistic performances, in particular, music events or visual art. It was conceived to enable low-level and low-cost audience interaction by offering a set of tracker-nodes to be arranged across the venue as...
Article
Full-text available
Driving a motor vehicle requires various cognitive functions to process surrounding information, to guide appropriate actions, and especially to respond to or integrate with numerous contextual and perceptual hindrances or risks. It is, thus, imperative to examine driving performance and road safety from a perspective of cognitive neuroscience, whi...