Matthew J Moscou

Matthew J Moscou
The Sainsbury Laboratory | TSL · Moscou Group

PhD in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

About

187
Publications
39,147
Reads
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5,418
Citations
Citations since 2016
91 Research Items
3384 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
Introduction
Matthew Moscou's group at The Sainsbury Laboratory focuses on understanding immunity in the grasses. Current themes in our research include dissecting the genetic architecture of nonhost resistance, tradeoffs between biotrophs and necrotrophs, seedling versus adult plant resistance, and suppression of resistance in polyploid genomes. The group uses genetics and bioinformatics to explore biology and solve long-standing puzzles in biology.
Additional affiliations
July 2014 - present
The Sainsbury Laboratory
Position
  • Group Leader
September 2010 - May 2015
Iowa State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
January 2001 - August 2005
University of California, Riverside
Position
  • Student

Publications

Publications (187)
Preprint
Full-text available
Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat immune receptors (NLRs) directly or indirectly recognize pathogen-secreted effector molecules to initiate plant defense. Recognition of multiple pathogens by a single NLR is rare and usually occurs via monitoring for changes to host proteins; few characterized NLRs have been shown to recognize multiple e...
Article
Full-text available
Key message Understanding the molecular network, including protein-protein interactions, of VRS5 provide new routes towards the identification of other key regulators of plant architecture in barley. Abstract The TCP transcriptional regulator TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1 (TB1) is a key regulator of plant architecture. In barley, an important cereal crop, H...
Article
In the evolution of land plants, the plant immune system has experienced expansion in immune receptor and signaling pathways. Lineage-specific expansions have been observed in diverse gene families that are potentially involved in immunity but lack causal association. Here, we show that Rps8 -mediated resistance in barley to the pathogen Puccinia s...
Article
Full-text available
Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia hordei, is an economically significant disease of barley, but only a few major resistance genes to P. hordei (Rph) have been cloned. In this study, gene Rph3 was isolated by positional cloning and confirmed by mutational analysis and transgenic complementation. The Rph3 gene, which originated from wild barley and was f...
Article
Full-text available
The wild relatives and progenitors of wheat have been widely used as sources of disease resistance (R) genes. Molecular identification and characterization of these R genes facilitates their manipulation and tracking in breeding programmes. Here, we develop a reference-quality genome assembly of the wild diploid wheat relative Aegilops sharonensis...
Article
Full-text available
Disease lesion mimic (DLM) or necrotic mutants display necrotic lesions in the absence of pathogen infections. They can show improved resistance to some pathogens and their molecular dissection can contribute to revealing components of plant defense pathways. Although forward-genetics strategies to find genes causal to mutant phenotypes are availab...
Preprint
Full-text available
The wild relatives and progenitors of wheat have been widely used as sources of disease resistance ( R ) genes. Molecular identification and characterization of these R genes facilitates their manipulation and tracking in breeding programmes. We developed a reference-quality genome assembly of the wild diploid wheat relative Aegilops sharonensis an...
Preprint
Full-text available
In the evolution of land plants, the plant immune system has experienced expansion in immune receptor and signaling pathways. Lineage-specific expansions have been observed in diverse gene families that are potentially involved in immunity, but lack causal association. Here, we show that Rps8-mediated resistance in barley to the fungal pathogen Puc...
Article
Full-text available
Crop losses caused by plant pathogens are a primary threat to stable food production. Stripe rust ( Puccinia striiformis ) is a fungal pathogen of cereal crops that causes significant, persistent yield loss. Stripe rust exhibits host species specificity, with lineages that have adapted to infect wheat and barley. While wheat stripe rust and barley...
Article
A subset of plant NLR immune receptors carry unconventional integrated domains in addition to their canonical domain architecture. One example is rice Pik-1 that comprises an integrated heavy metal-associated (HMA) domain. Here, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of Pik-1 and its NLR partner, Pik-2, and tested hypotheses about adaptive evolu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Host resistance is considered the most effective means to control plant diseases; however, individually deployed resistance genes are often rapidly overcome by pathogen adaptation. Combining multiple effective resistance genes is the optimal approach to durable resistance, but the lack of functional markers for resistance genes has hampered impleme...
Preprint
Full-text available
Barley is the fourth largest cereal crop grown worldwide, and essential for food and feed production. Phenotypically, the barley spike, which is unbranched, occurs in two main architectural shapes: two-rowed or six-rowed. In the 6-rowed cultivars, all three florets of the triple floret meristem develop into seeds while in 2-rowed lines only the cen...
Article
Full-text available
Sequence assembly of large and repeat-rich plant genomes has been challenging, requiring substantial computational resources and often several complementary sequence assembly and genome mapping approaches. The recent development of fast and accurate long-read sequencing by circular consensus sequencing (CCS) on the PacBio platform may greatly incre...
Preprint
Full-text available
A subset of plant NLR immune receptors carry unconventional integrated domains in addition to their canonical domain architecture. One example is rice Pik-1 that comprises an integrated heavy metal-associated (HMA) domain. Here, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of Pik-1 and its NLR partner, Pik-2, and tested hypotheses about adaptive evolu...
Article
This article is part of the Top 10 Unanswered Questions in MPMI invited review series. Nonhost resistance is typically considered the ability of a plant species to repel all attempts of a pathogen species to colonize it and reproduce on it. Based on this common definition, nonhost resistance is presumed to be very durable and, thus, of great intere...
Article
The Xo1 locus in the heirloom rice variety Carolina Gold Select confers resistance to bacterial leaf streak and bacterial blight, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pvs. oryzicola and oryzae, respectively. Resistance is triggered by pathogen-delivered transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) independent of their ability to activate transcription an...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Xo1 locus in the heirloom rice variety Carolina Gold Select confers resistance to bacterial leaf streak and bacterial blight, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pvs. oryzicola and oryzae, respectively. Resistance is triggered by pathogen-delivered transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) independent of their ability to activate transcription, a...
Article
Full-text available
Stem rust is an important disease of wheat that can be controlled using resistance genes. The gene SuSr-D1 identified in cultivar ‘Canthatch’ suppresses stem rust resistance. SuSr-D1 mutants are resistant to several races of stem rust that are virulent on wild-type plants. Here we identify SuSr-D1 by sequencing flow-sorted chromosomes, mutagenesis,...
Article
Full-text available
The fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr) causes tan spot, a destructive foliar disease of wheat worldwide. The pathogen produces several necrotrophic effectors, which induce necrosis or chlorosis on susceptible wheat lines. Multiple races of Ptr have been identified, based on their ability to produce one or more of these effectors. Ptr has a w...
Article
Full-text available
Long-read sequencing facilitates assembly of complex genomic regions. In plants, loci containing nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NLR) disease resistance genes are an important example of such regions. NLR genes constitute one of the largest gene families in plants and are often clustered, evolving via duplication, contraction, and transpos...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Long-read sequencing facilitates assembly of complex genomic regions. In plants, loci containing nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NLR) disease resistance genes are an important example of such regions. NLR genes make up one of the largest gene families in plants and are often clustered, evolving via duplication, contraction, and...
Article
Full-text available
‘Speed breeding’ (SB) shortens the breeding cycle and accelerates crop research through rapid generation advancement. SB can be carried out in numerous ways, one of which involves extending the duration of plants’ daily exposure to light, combined with early seed harvest, to cycle quickly from seed to seed, thereby reducing the generation times for...
Article
Full-text available
Phytopathogens have a limited range of host plant species that they can successfully parasitise ie. that they are adapted for. Infection of plants by nonadapted pathogens often results in an active resistance response that is relatively poorly characterised because phenotypic variation in this response often does not exist within a plant species, o...
Article
Full-text available
Multilayered defense responses ensure that plants are hosts to only a few adapted pathogens in the environment. The host range of a plant pathogen depends on its ability to fully overcome plant defense barriers, with failure at any single step sufficient to prevent life cycle completion of the pathogen. Puccinia striiformis, the causal agent of str...
Data
Composite interval mapping of leaf browning (orange) and pCOL (purple) in response to the four P. striiformis isolates based on individual replicates in the ABR6 x Bd21 F4:5 families. Phenotypes of F4:5 families were scored at 14 dpi with P. striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) isolates 08/21 (A and B), 08/501 (C and D), and 11/08 (E and F), and P. str...
Data
Composite interval mapping of leaf browning and pCOL in response to P. striiformis f. sp. tritici isolate 08/21 in the Foz1 x Luc1 (A) and Luc1 x Jer1 (B) F2 populations. F2 lines were phenotyped for leaf browning at 14 dpi (magenta) and at 23 dpi (yellow), for pCOL at 23 dpi (green), and Luc1 x Jer1 F2:3 families were phenotyped at 14 dpi (orange)...
Data
Two cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS) markers used to genotype Foz1 x Luc1 and Luc1 x Jer1 F1 plants. Markers are adapted from Barbieri et al. 2012. (PDF)
Data
Candidate gene analysis in Yrr3 maximal two-LOD support interval. (XLSX)
Data
Comparison of Bradi4g24315 proteins. (PPTX)
Data
Region of synteny on wheat chromosome 4 that maintains some gene collinearity with non-NLR genes present at the Brachypodium Yrr2 locus. (PPTX)
Data
Location of co-linear wheat sequences with homology to Brachypodium genes present at the Yrr1 locus. (PPTX)
Data
Yrr1 SNP haplotype analysis and Pst infection phenotypes. (XLSX)
Data
Genes annotated in the Brachypodium v3.1 genome that are present at the Yrr2 locus. (XLSX)
Data
Frequency distribution and correlation of leaf browning and pCOL phenotypes in the ABR6 x Bd21 F4:5 population inoculated with several isolates of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici. Distribution of leaf browning (A, D, G, and J) and pCOL (B, E, H, and K) and the correlation between these two phenotypes (C, F, I, and L) in the F4:5 families averaged acr...
Data
Linkage groups of Foz1 x Luc1 genetic map. Cumulative cM distances and SNP marker names are shown to the left and right of each chromosome, respectively. cM distance at the F2 stage was estimated using the Kosambi function. SNP marker names consist of the corresponding chromosome and physical position in the Bd21 reference genome (version 3). (PDF)
Data
Support intervals determined by interval mapping of the pCOL phenotypes and corresponding physical positions in the Bd21 reference genome. (XLSX)
Data
Gene identifiers for the annotated canonical resistance genes shown in Fig 5. (XLSX)
Data
KASP primers for the Foz1 x Luc1 and Luc1 x Jer1 genetic maps. (XLSX)
Data
Coding sequences of annotated B. distachyon reference genes in the Yrr1 and Yrr3 intervals converted into the ABR6, Luc1, and Jer1 genotypes. (FA)
Data
Neighbor joining phylogenetic tree showing two distinct haplotypes exist at the Yrr1 locus. (PPTX)
Data
Linkage groups of Luc1 x Jer1 genetic map. Cumulative cM distances and SNP marker names are shown to the left and right of each chromosome, respectively. cM distance at the F2 stage was estimated using the Kosambi function. SNP marker names consist of the corresponding chromosome and physical position in the Bd21 reference genome (version 3). (PDF)
Data
QTLs from composite interval mapping of individual replicates in the ABR6 x Bd21 F4:5 population. (PDF)
Data
Significant QTLs from two-dimensional QTL analysis using leaf browning and percent colonization phenotypes for diverse P. striiformis isolates and B. distachyon populations. (XLSX)
Data
Candidate gene analysis in Yrr1 maximal two-LOD support interval. (XLSX)
Data
Leaf browning and pCOL phenotype data for the ABR6 x Bd21 F4:5 families. (XLSX)
Data
Pst infection phenotypes and segregation ratios of F5 families from F4 plants 93 and 56. (PPTX)
Data
PCR sequencing markers at the Yrr1 locus. (DOCX)
Data
Genes annotated in the Brachypodium v3.1 genome that are present at the Yrr1 locus. (XLSX)
Data
SNPs present in 11 genes at the Yrr1 locus in a panel of Brachypodium accession. (XLSX)
Data
Frequency distribution and correlation of leaf browning and pCOL phenotypes in the Foz1 x Luc1 and Luc1 x Jer1 F2 populations inoculated with P. striiformis f. sp. tritici isolate 08/21. Leaf browning phenotypes were collected at 14 dpi (A and E) and at 23 dpi (B and F), and pCOL phenotypes were collected at 23 dpi (C and G). Correlation between le...
Data
Two-way recombination fraction plots for the Foz1 x Luc1 F2 population (A) and the Luc1 x Jer1 F2 population (B). (PDF)
Data
Segregation distortion in the Foz1 x Luc1 (A) and the Luc1 x Jer1 (B) F2 populations. For each marker of the genetic maps, the frequencies of F2 individuals with homozygous maternal genotypes (solid magenta lines), homozygous paternal genotypes (dashed green lines), or heterozygous genotypes (solid black lines) were calculated (scale on left). Data...
Data
Phylogenetic tree of P. striiformis isolates using maximum likelihood. DNA or RNA indicate genome or transcriptome sequencing. Tree branches represent nucleotide substitution rates (per million sites) and bootstrap values above 70 (based on 1,000 replicates) are shown. (PDF)
Data
Structural variation and gene expression information for the annotated canonical resistance genes shown in Fig 5. (XLSX)
Data
Leaf browning and pCOL phenotype data for the Foz1 x Luc1 and Luc1 x Jer1 F2 populations. (XLSX)
Data
Phenotypic segregation of Yrr1 amongst BdTR10h x Tek-4 progeny. (PPTX)
Data
Pst analysis of F3 families from critical recombinant F2 plants. (PPTX)
Data
Comparison of Bradi4g24366 between Brachypodium accessions. (XLSX)
Data
Source of resequencing reads for a diverse panel of B. distachyon accessions. (DOCX)
Data
Pseudogenes excluded from the Yrr1 haplotype analysis. (XLSX)
Preprint
Full-text available
To meet the challenge of feeding a growing population, breeders and scientists are continuously looking for ways to increase genetic gain in crop breeding. One way this can be achieved is through 'speed breeding' (SB), which shortens the breeding cycle and accelerates research studies through rapid generation advancement. The SB method can be carri...
Article
Oat crown rust caused by Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae is the most destructive foliar disease of cultivated oat. Characterization of genetic factors controlling resistance responses to Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae in non-host species could provide new resources for developing disease protection strategies in oat. We examined symptom developmen...
Preprint
Oat crown rust caused by Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae is the most destructive foliar disease of cultivated oat. Characterization of genetic factors controlling resistance responses to Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae in non-host species could provide new resources for developing disease protection strategies in oat. We examined symptom developmen...