Matthew Ian McKim Louder

Matthew Ian McKim Louder
Texas A&M University | TAMU · Department of Biology

Ph.D.
sitting down

About

30
Publications
4,431
Reads
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465
Citations
Citations since 2017
22 Research Items
437 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
Introduction
Additional affiliations
March 2020 - present
H. T. Harvey & Associates
Position
  • Ecologist
December 2018 - February 2019
The University of Tokyo
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2018 - November 2018
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
Avian obligate brood parasites, which rely solely on hosts to raise their young, should choose the highest quality hosts to maximize reproductive output. Brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) are extreme host generalists, yet female cowbirds could use information based on past reproductive outcomes to make egg-laying decisions thus minimizing fitn...
Article
Brood-parasitic offspring sexually (mis)imprinting on the foster parents is considered one of the greatest constraints to the evolution of interspecific avian brood parasitism. While most nonparasitic juvenile birds learn the behaviours and mate choice preferences from their own parents, social parasites must avoid misimprinting on their host speci...
Article
Full-text available
Auditory communication in humans and other animals frequently takes place in noisy environments with many co‐occurring signallers. Receivers are thus challenged to rapidly recognize salient auditory signals and filter out irrelevant sounds. Most bird species produce a variety of complex vocalizations that function to communicate with other members...
Article
How does a naive, young animal decide from which adults to learn behavior? Obligate brood parasitic birds, including brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater), face a particular challenge in learning species-specific behaviors; they lay their eggs in the nest of another species, and juveniles are raised without exposure to adult conspecifics. Neverthe...
Article
Full-text available
The recognition of and differential responses to salient stimuli are among the main drivers of behavioral plasticity, yet, how animals evolve and modulate functional responses to novel classes of antagonistic stimuli remain poorly understood. We studied free-living male red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) to test whether gene expression res...
Article
Full-text available
Movement of the embryo is essential for musculoskeletal development in vertebrates, yet little is known about whether, and why, species vary. Avian brood parasites exhibit feats of strength in early life as adaptations to exploit the hosts that rear them. We hypothesized that an increase in embryonic movement could allow brood parasites to develop...
Article
Full-text available
The zebra finch ( Taeniopygia guttata ) is a socially monogamous and colonial opportunistic breeder with pronounced sexual differences in singing and plumage coloration. Its natural history has led to it becoming a model species for research into sex differences in vocal communication, as well as behavioral, neural and genomic theories of imitative...
Article
Full-text available
Whole-genome sequencing projects are increasingly populating the tree of life and characterizing biodiversity1,2,3,4. Sparse taxon sampling has previously been proposed to confound phylogenetic inference5, and captures only a fraction of the genomic diversity. Here we report a substantial step towards the dense representation of avian phylogenetic...
Article
Full-text available
Avian obligate brood parasites do not provide parental care for their eggs and young, and may therefore serve as a strong model system to test predictions of evolutionary sex‐allocation theories, independent of parental modulation of primary sex ratios. However, none of the handful of previous studies examining offspring sex ratio in brood parasiti...
Article
Prolactin is often referred to as the “parental hormone” but there are examples in which prolactin and parental behavior are disconnected. One intriguing example is in avian obligate brood parasites; species exhibiting high circulating prolactin but no parental care. To understand this disconnect, we examined transcriptional and behavioral response...
Article
Full-text available
For the last 40 years, the study of cooperative breeding (CB) in birds has proceeded primarily in the context of discovering the ecological, geographic and behavioral drivers of helping. The advent of molecular tools in the early 1990s assisted in clarifying the relatedness of helpers to those helped; in some cases confirming predictions of kin sel...
Preprint
Full-text available
The recognition of and differential responses to salient stimuli are among the main drivers of behavioral plasticity, yet, how animals evolve and modulate functional responses to novel classes of antagonistic stimuli remain poorly understood. We studied free-living male red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) to test whether gene expression pat...
Article
Full-text available
Females are expected to have evolved to be more discriminatory in mate choice than males as a result of greater reproductive investment into larger gametes (eggs vs. sperm). In turn, males are predicted to be more promiscuous than females, showing both a larger variance in the number of mates and a greater increase in reproductive success with more...
Article
Full-text available
Parental care is critical for offspring survival in many species. However, parental behaviors have been lost in roughly 1% of avian species known as the obligate brood parasites. To shed light on molecular and neurobiological mechanisms mediating brood parasitic behavior, we compared brain gene expression patterns between two brood parasitic specie...
Article
Full-text available
Species recognition mediates the association of individuals with conspecifics. Learned cues often facilitate species recognition via early social experience with parents and siblings. Yet, in some songbirds, the production of species-typical vocalizations develops in the absence of early social experiences. Here, we investigate the auditory-evoked...
Article
Full-text available
Prenatal auditory stimulation is known to critically affect the development of acoustic preference and species recognition throughout ontogeny in birds. We focus our review on experimental studies that have used birds as model systems to explore the effects of prenatal auditory stimulation on the developing organism. To begin, we introduce concepts...
Preprint
Full-text available
Parental care for is critical for offspring survival in many species. However, parental behaviors have been lost in roughly 1% of avian species known as the obligate brood parasites. To shed light on molecular and neurobiological mechanisms mediating brood parasitic behavior, brain gene expression patterns between two brood parasitic species and on...
Article
Amongst an array of stimuli from countless species, animals must recognize salient signals, including those of their own species. In songbirds, behavioral tests have demonstrated that preferences for conspecific male songs are determined by both preexisting biases and social experience with a male 'tutor' during the sensitive period for learning. A...
Article
Obligate avian brood parasites are raised by heterospecific hosts and therefore, lack critical early exposure to relatives and other conspecifics. Yet, young brood parasites readily recognize and affiliate with others of their own species upon independence. One solution to this social recognition paradox is the ontogenetic password mechanism utiliz...
Article
Full-text available
In many territorial species, occasional movements beyond territory boundaries (extraterritorial forays) have been documented in many species. While many explanations for the occurrence of extraterritorial forays have been proposed, a logical and proposed function of extraterritorial forays is to engage in extra-pair copulations with extra-pair mate...
Preprint
Full-text available
The goal of educating the public about environmental and conservation issues is found in the mission statements of almost every zoo in the world. In order to effectively teach their visitors, zoos must understand how they are communicating with their public. In this study, we attempt to quantify how Sylvan Heights Bird Park (SHBP) communicates with...
Preprint
Full-text available
The goal of educating the public about environmental and conservation issues is found in the mission statements of almost every zoo in the world. In order to effectively teach their visitors, zoos must understand how they are communicating with their public. In this study, we attempt to quantify how Sylvan Heights Bird Park (SHBP) communicates with...
Preprint
Full-text available
The goal of educating the public about environmental and conservation issues is found in the mission statements of almost every zoo in the world. In order to effectively teach their visitors, zoos must understand how they are communicating with their public. In this study, we attempt to quantify how Sylvan Heights Bird Park (SHBP) communicates with...
Chapter
Chicks of avian brood parasites either cohabit with host nestlings (e.g., cowbirds, non-evictor cuckoos) or eventually eliminate their potential competitors and are raised as the sole inhabitants of the foster parents’ nest. This latter phenomenon, termed as direct killing, involves the young brood parasitic chick evicting all other eggs or hatchli...
Article
Full-text available
Host manipulation by parasites is generally regarded as a classic example of the extended phenotype, where selection favors parasite genes that adaptively alter their host’s phenotype. However, selection would simultaneously favor both hosts that recoup some fitness lost to infection (i.e., compensation) and the parasites that enhance transmission...
Article
Full-text available
Attempts to estimate and identify factors influencing first-year survival in passerines, survival between fledging and the first reproductive attempt (i.e. juvenile survival), have largely been confounded by natal dispersal, particularly in long-distance migratory passerines. We studied Prothonotary Warblers (Protonotaria citrea) breeding in nest b...
Data
Model selection to estimate transition probabilities for Prothonotary Warblers, Protonotaria citrea, in southern Illinois, USA, 2004–10. (DOCX)
Data
Model selection to estimate recapture probabilities for Prothonotary Warblers, Protonotaria citrea, in southern Illinois, USA, 2004–10. (DOCX)
Data
Probability (mean 1 SE) of transition between fledging and four distance categories for Prothonotary Warblers in southern Illinois, USA, 2004–2010. (TIFF)

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