Matthew A. Ladwig

Matthew A. Ladwig
Purdue University Northwest · Department of Biological Sciences

PhD

About

20
Publications
12,029
Reads
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221
Citations
Introduction
I am a kinesiologist who focuses on pediatric exercise and health psychology. The overall goal of my research is to understand why children become increasingly sedentary as they age. More specifically, I aim to identify and intervene on the neuro-bio-psycho-social mechanisms underlying the most dramatic decrease in physical activity that occurs proximal to adolescence. Ultimately, I hope to understand how to help children be more physically active across their lifespan.
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - August 2022
Penn State Hershey Medical Center and Penn State College of Medicine
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2015 - May 2019
Iowa State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
August 2013 - June 2015
Ball State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2015 - May 2019
Iowa State University
Field of study
  • Kinesiology - Emphases on Exercise Psychology & Pediatric Physical Activity Promotion
August 2013 - July 2015
Ball State University
Field of study
  • Double Major: Sport and Exercise Psychology & Cognitive and Social Processes
August 2008 - May 2013
Purdue University-Calumet
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
Apply It! 1. Always remember what the "prime objective" of any exercise or physical activity plan should be: encourage lifelong activity. Short-term adaptations (e.g., weight loss, fitness gains) should be considered secondary. 2. Between allowing clients to choose their own pace and deciding for them, prefer the former but monitor for extreme resp...
Article
Full-text available
The transition from childhood to adolescence is marked by a dramatic decrease in physical activity (PA). Physical education (PE) experiences may contribute to this change but remain underresearched. Using a retrospective survey, we examined whether memories of enjoyment or nonenjoyment of PE relate to present-day (adult) attitudes, intentions, PA,...
Article
Objectives: Physical education could play a role in attenuating the decline in physical activity during the childhood-to-adolescence transition and inspiring children to adopt a lifelong physical activity habit. While psychological theories (e.g., Self-Determination Theory, Achievement Goal Theory) offer pointers for desirable changes to practice n...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the myriad benefits associated with regular physical activity (PA), few American adults accrue sufficient weekly PA. Though “lack of time” is often cited as a correlate of physical inactivity, a growing body of evidence suggests that, perhaps more importantly, people allocate their limited leisure-time to activities they find more enjoyable...
Chapter
Full-text available
We provide guidance for the measurement of affective responses to exercise for practicing professionals. Affective responses include the pleasure and displeasure experienced before, during, and after acute bouts of exercise. Example vignettes at the beginning and end of the chapter provide illustrations of contrasting measurement approaches. In thi...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Few Americans accumulate enough physical activity (PA) to realize its benefits. Understanding how and why individuals use their discretionary time for different forms of PA could help identify and rectify issues that drive individuals away from certain physical activities, and leverage successful strategies to increase participation in...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility, acceptability, and short-term adherence to an adult outdoor group sport play program designed to maximize enjoyment that was modified to incorporate COVID-19 risk mitigation strategies. We enrolled 17 healthy, but sedentary, central Pennsylvania adults (mean age = 31.6 ± 7.3) without obe...
Article
The ability to distinguish between discrete emotions by monitoring autonomic or facial features has been an elusive "holy grail" for fields such as psychophysiology, affective computing, and human–computer interface design. However, cross-validated models are lacking, and contemporary theory suggests that emotions may lack distinct physiological or...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the inverse relationship between physical activity (PA) and physical function, few older adults achieve PA recommendations. In response to observations that “lack of time” underlies reduced PA among older adults, recent work suggests even short bouts of PA can improve health and fitness. In addition, because they are frequently visited by o...
Article
The study of how people feel when they exercise has been one of the main research directions within the field of exercise psychology since its inception. This chapter reviews the historical bases of research on the affective changes that accompany bouts of exercise. It provides a critical analysis of methodological elements that characterized early...
Conference Paper
Compulsory cardiorespiratory fitness testing, whether through incremental exercise to exhaustion (e.g., PACER test) or continuous vigorous exercise (e.g., the mile run), remain staples of physical education (PE) curricula. However, the benefits of such tests have been questioned. Although some children may enjoy these tests for their competitive as...
Chapter
This chapter provides methodological guidance for researchers interested in investigating the pleasures and displeasures that participants feel in response to exercise (termed ‘affective responses’). A conclusion often found in textbooks is that exercise makes people ‘feel better’ but this statement seems to contrast with the low rates of regular p...
Conference Paper
PURPOSE: The transition from childhood to adolescence is marked by a dramatic decrease in physical activity (PA). While many mediating factors have been suggested to explain this drop, one of the most influential may be the experiences children derive from physical education (PE). Scholars have been voicing concerns about the potential long-term im...
Article
Exercise or physical activity are recommended options within stepped-care treatment models for depression. However, few physicians present these options to patients, in part because of the impression that the supporting evidence is weak or inconsistent. We speculate that the coocurrence of “counter-messaging” and deficient critical appraisal may le...
Chapter
The promotion of physical activity and exercise has been a persistently challenging problem for industrialized societies. Traditionally, these behaviors have been conceptualized as resulting from the rational processing of information (e.g., regarding anticipated benefits, personal capabilities, sources of support). Therefore, attempts to change th...
Conference Paper
An important goal of physical education (PE) is to foster a lifelong tendency to be physically active. However, the abysmal physical activity (PA) rates in the United States make it apparent that exposure to PE as a child may not be beneficially influencing adult PA levels. In fact, for many, the traditional PE experience may have deleterious conse...
Thesis
Full-text available
Memories for affective experiences, especially those which occur at the peak and the end of them (see Fredrickson, 2000; Kahneman, Fredrickson, Schrieber, & Redelmeier, 1993), have been shown to be important in subsequent preference and decision-making. The aim of the current study was to examine whether a pre-workout warm-up could improve the exer...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between a pre-workout warm-up and psychological processes. Seventy-six (n=76) participants from a small, Midwestern college aged 18-25 were surveyed. Study primarily focused on the levels of enjoyment and motivation reported by warm-up users versus non-warm-up users. Additionally,...

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