Matthew A. Kolmann

Matthew A. Kolmann
University of Michigan | U-M · Museum of Paleontology

Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Michigan • Incoming Assistant Professor, University of Louisville

About

42
Publications
16,823
Reads
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404
Citations
Introduction
Using phylogenies generated from molecular data to examine trait (physiological, anatomical, behavioral) evolution in characiforms, needlefishes, puffers, rays, and other fishes. Particularly interested in the evolution of material and structural properties, complex feeding morphologies, and why there are so many damn fishes.
Additional affiliations
March 2020 - August 2020
University of Washington Seattle
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • Instructor for Research in Marine Biology (FHL 470) and co-instructor for the Functional Morphology & Ecology of Fishes - courses centered around student-driven research. Students learn CT, SEM, light microscopy & 3D printing, along with material testing and other engineering techniques. We use experimentation & modeling to explore the form, function, and behavior of fishes and other marine life.
January 2018 - January 2020
George Washington University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • I am an NSF PRFB recipient working at George Washington University on the evolutionary morphology and phylogenetics of piranhas, pacus, and their allies.
September 2016 - present
University of Washington Seattle
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • I teach Biology of Fishes (FHL305) and Research Methods in Marine Biology at Friday Harbor Labs.
Education
September 2016 - January 2018
University of Washington Friday Harbor Labs
Field of study
  • Functional morphology & biomechanics
September 2012 - September 2016
University of Toronto
Field of study
  • Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
September 2009 - September 2012
Florida State University
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences - Functional Morphology, Fisheries Ecology

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Evolutionary transitions between marine and freshwater ecosystems have occurred repeatedly throughout the phylogenetic history of fishes. The theory of ecological opportunity predicts that lineages that colonize species-poor regions will have greater potential for phenotypic diversification than lineages invading species-rich regions. Thus, transit...
Preprint
Brain anatomy provides key evidence for ray-finned fish relationships, but two key limitations obscure our understanding of neuroanatomical evolution in this major vertebrate group. First, the deepest branching living lineages are separated from the group's common ancestor by hundreds of millions of years, with indications that aspects of their bra...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract: Patterns of integration and modularity among organismal traits are prevalent across the tree of life, and at multiple scales of biological organization. Over the past several decades, researchers have studied these patterns at the developmental, and evolutionary levels. While their work has identified the potential drivers for these patte...
Article
Habitat transitions are key potential explanations for why some lineages have diversified and others have not - from Anolis lizards to Darwin's finches. The ecological ramifications of marine-to-freshwater transitions for fishes suggest evolutionary contingency: some lineages maintain their ancestral niches in novel habitats (niche conservatism), w...
Article
Full-text available
Hyperspectral data encode information from electromagnetic radiation (i.e., color) of any object in the form of a spectral signature; these data can then be used to distinguish among materials or even map whole landscapes. Although hyperspectral data have been mostly used to study landscape ecology, floral diversity and many other applications in t...
Article
The subfamily Potamotrygoninae, the only extant clade of elasmobranchs exclusive to freshwater environments, encompasses four genera and 38 species distributed across almost every major South American river basin. Despite their importance in the ornamental fish trade, the taxonomy and evolutionary relationships within potamotrygonines have not yet...
Article
Aim Paleogeographic changes have had profound effects on the evolution and diversity of the Neotropical biota. However, the influence of marine incursions on the origin, diversification, and distribution of fishes is still incompletely understood. We investigate the biogeographical and chronological patterns of diversification for the marine‐derive...
Article
The Amazon and neighboring South American river basins harbor the world's most diverse assemblages of freshwater fishes. One of the most prominent South American fish families is the Serrasalmidae (pacus and piranhas), found in nearly every continental basin. Serrasalmids are keystone ecological taxa, being some of the top riverine predators as wel...
Article
Biological armours are potent model systems for understanding the complex series of competing demands on protective exoskeletons; after all, armoured organisms are the product of millions of years of refined engineering under the harshest conditions. Fishes are no strangers to armour, with various types of armour plating common to the 400-500 Myr o...
Article
Full-text available
Synopsis The decreasing cost of acquiring computed tomographic (CT) data has fueled a global effort to digitize the anatomy of museum specimens. This effort has produced a wealth of open access digital three-dimensional (3D) models of anatomy available to anyone with access to the Internet. The potential applications of these data are broad, rangin...
Article
Full-text available
Given the conservation status and ecological, cultural, and commercial importance of chondrichthyan fishes, it is valuable to evaluate the extent to which research attention is spread across taxa and geographic locations and to assess the degree to which scientific research is appropriately addressing the challenges they face. Here we review trends...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat occupancy can have a profound influence on macroevolutionary dynamics, and a switch in major habitat type may alter the evolutionary trajectory of a lineage. In this study, we investigate how evolutionary transitions between marine and freshwater habitats affect macroevolutionary adaptive landscapes, using needlefishes (Belonidae) as a mode...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Amazon and neighboring South American river basins harbor the world's most diverse assemblages of freshwater fishes. One of the most prominent South American fish families are the Serrasalmidae (pacus and piranhas), found in nearly every continental basin. Serrasalmids are keystone ecological taxa, being some of the top riverine predators as we...
Article
Full-text available
We explored the macroevolutionary dynamics of miniaturisation in New World anchovies by integrating a time‐calibrated phylogeny, geometric morphometrics and phylogenetic comparative methods. We found that the paedomorphic species Amazonsprattus scintilla occupies a novel region of shape space, while the dwarf species Anchoviella manamensis has an o...
Article
Full-text available
Synopsis Evolutionary transitions between habitats have been catalysts for some of the most stunning examples of adaptive diversification, with novel niches and new resources providing ecological opportunity for such radiations. In aquatic animals, transitions from saltwater to freshwater habitats are rare, but occur often enough that in the Neotro...
Article
Full-text available
Tooth replacement in piranhas is unusual: all teeth on one side of the head are lost as a unit, then replaced simultaneously. We used histology and microCT to examine tooth-replacement modes across carnivorous piranhas and their herbivorous pacu cousins (Serrasalmidae) and then mapped replacement patterns onto a molecular phylogeny. Pacu teeth deve...
Article
Full-text available
Herbivorous fishes feed on stems, leaves, flowers, seeds, fruits, and nuts of diverse aquatic plants, as well as algae. Pacus are the herbivorous cousins of piranhas and consume a myriad of diets comprised of these plant products, but a few species are phytophages, herbivores that feed almost exclusively on rapids-dwelling (rheophilic) riverweed pl...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of sexually dimorphic traits is thought to have marked effects on underlying patterns of static allometry. These traits can negatively affect organismal survivability by creating trade-offs between trait size and performance. Here we use three-dimensional geometric morphometrics to study the static allometry of two species of sexually...
Article
Convergent evolution is at the forefront of many form-function studies. There are many examples of multiple independent lineages evolving a similar morphology in response to similar functional demands, providing a framework for testing hypotheses of form-function evolution. However, there are numerous clades with underappreciated convergence, in wh...
Article
Full-text available
Durophagous predators consume hard‐shelled prey such as bivalves, gastropods, and large crustaceans, typically by crushing the mineralized exoskeleton. This is costly from the point of view of the bite forces involved, handling times, and the stresses inflicted on the predator's skeleton. It is not uncommon for durophagous taxa to display an ontoge...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of sexually dimorphic traits is thought to have marked effects on underlying patterns of static allom-etry. These traits can negatively affect organismal survivability by creating trade-offs between trait size and performance. Here we use three-dimensional geometric morphometrics to study the static allometry of two species of sexuall...
Article
Full-text available
The serrasalmids: piranhas, pacus, and their relatives, are ubiquitous Neotropical fishes with diverse diets, ecologies, and behaviors. Serrasalmids have a bony, serrated keel which lines the underbellies of these fishes, the structure for which the family is named. We examined the diversity and structure of the keel in piranhas and allies using mi...
Article
Full-text available
Animal performance is tightly linked to morphological function, whereby changes in size and performance can influence niche dynamics over ontogeny. To understand how growth affects feeding performance, we examined how bite force over ontogeny differed between two populations of durophagous stingrays, Rhinoptera bonasus (from the Chesapeake Bay and...
Article
Full-text available
Although rare within the context of 30 000 species of extant fishes, scale-feeding as an ecological strategy has evolved repeatedly across the teleost tree of life. Scalefeeding (lepidophagous) fishes are diverse in terms of their ecology, behaviour, and specialized morphologies for grazing on scales and mucus of sympatric species. Despite this div...
Preprint
Full-text available
The evolution of sexual weaponry is thought to have marked effects on the underlying static allometry that builds them. These weapons can negatively affect organismal survivability by creating trade-offs between trait size and performance. Here we use three-dimensional geometric morphometrics to study the static allometry of two species of sexually...
Article
Full-text available
A fundamental challenge for both sustainable fisheries and biodiversity protection in the Neotropics is the accurate determination of species identity. The biodiversity of the coastal sharks of Guyana is poorly understood, but these species are subject to both artisanal fishing as well as harvesting by industrialized offshore fleets. To determine w...
Article
Full-text available
The various configurations of the jaws, anterior branchial arches and neurocranium provide some of the fundamental synapomorphies, distinguishing the major lineages of sharks, rays and ratfishes. For the Neotropical freshwater stingrays (family Potamotrygonidae), putatively unique skeletal elements, the angular cartilages, are intermediate between...
Article
Full-text available
The planktivorous mobulid rays are a sister group to, and descended from, rhinopterid and myliobatid rays that possess a dentition showing adaptations consistent with a specialized durophagous diet. Within the Paleocene and Eocene, there are several taxa that display dentitions apparently transitional between these extreme trophic modalities, in pa...
Article
It emerges that a dogfish shark's spine becomes stiffer as the fish swims faster, enabling the animal to swim efficiently at different speeds. The finding could also provide inspiration for the design of robotic biomaterials.
Article
Full-text available
Chewing, characterized by shearing jaw motions and high-crowned molar teeth, is considered an evolutionary innovation that spurred dietary diversification and evolutionary radiation of mammals. Complex prey-processing behaviours have been thought to be lacking in fishes and other vertebrates, despite the fact that many of these animals feed on toug...
Article
Full-text available
Three complete mitochondrial genomes of South American electric fishes (Gymnotiformes), derived from high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), are reported herein. We report the complete mitochondrial genome of the bluntnose knifefish Brachyhypopomus n.sp. VERD, determined from newly sequenced data. We also provide the complete mitochondrial genome...
Article
Full-text available
Chewing, characterized by shearing jaw motions and high-crowned molar teeth, is considered an evolutionary innovation that spurred dietary diversification and evolutionary radiation of mammals. Complex prey-processing behaviours have been thought to be lacking in fishes and other vertebrates, despite the fact that many of these animals feed on toug...
Article
Full-text available
Chewing, characterized by shearing jaw motions and high-crowned molar teeth, is considered an evolutionary innovation that spurred dietary diversification and evolutionary radiation of mammals. Complex prey-processing behaviours have been thought to be lacking in fishes and other vertebrates, despite the fact that many of these animals feed on toug...
Chapter
Full-text available
Twenty-four sites near two camps, (one near the Kusad Mountain, and the other in the Parabara area) in the southern Rupununi savannah region of Guyana, were sampled between 20 October and 6 November 2013 by an international team of researchers and local fishermen. We recorded 168 fish species (114 from sites near Kusad Mountain, 85 from the Parabar...
Article
Full-text available
All stingrays in the family Myliobatidae are durophagous, consuming bivalves and gastropods, as well as decapod crustaceans. Durophagous rays have rigid jaws, flat teeth that interlock to form pavement-like tooth plates, and large muscles which generate bite forces capable of fracturing stiff biological composites (e.g., mollusk shell). The relativ...
Article
Growth affects the performance of structure, so the pattern of growth must influence the role of a structure and an organism. Because animal performance is linked to morphological specialization, ontogenetic change in size may influence an organism's biological role. High bite force generation is presumably selected for in durophagous taxa. Therefo...
Article
Chondrichthyans (sharks, batoids, and chimaeras) have simple feeding mechanisms owing to their relatively few cranial skeletal elements. However, the indirect association of the jaws to the cranium (euhyostylic jaw suspension) has resulted in myriad cranial muscle rearrangements of both the hyoid and mandibular elements. We examined the cranial mus...
Conference Paper
The cownose ray is a source of controversy and increasing media attention due to interactions with commercial fisheries and on-bottom aquaculture operations for bivalves such as oysters, clams, and bay scallops. Claims of increases in the population of cownose rays coupled with increases in damage to shellfish culture, grow-out, and restoration ope...
Article
Organismal performance changes over ontogeny as the musculoskeletal systems underlying animal behavior grow in relative size and shape. As performance is a determinant of feeding ecology, ontogenetic changes in the former can influence the latter. The horn shark Heterodontus francisci consumes hard-shelled benthic invertebrates, which may be proble...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
- find new ways to apply CT tech to biomechanics, anatomy, systematics - communicate new techniques to diverse researchers
Project
- Evolutionary feeding biomechanics in pacus and piranhas (Serrasalmidae) - functional coordination among oral & pharyngeal jaws - interaction of biological materials