Matthew Kauffman

Matthew Kauffman
University of Wyoming | UW · Department of Zoology and Physiology

About

116
Publications
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Publications

Publications (116)
Technical Report
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Migration is widespread across taxonomic groups and increasingly recognized as fundamental to maintaining abundant wildlife populations and communities. Many ungulate herds migrate across the western United States to access food and avoid harsh environmental conditions. With the advent of global positioning system (GPS) collars, researchers can des...
Article
Utility‐scale solar energy (USSE) has become an efficient and cost‐effective form of renewable energy, with an expanding footprint into rangelands that provide important habitat for many wild ungulate populations. Using global positioning system data collected before and after construction, we documented the potential impacts of USSE on pronghorn (...
Article
Full-text available
Animal movement can mediate the ecological consequences of fragmentation; however, barriers such as fences, roads, and railways are becoming a pervasive threat to wildlife. Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) habitat in western North America has been fragmented by roads, railways, and fences. Although pronghorn are sensitive to barriers, neither the...
Article
Full-text available
In the face of climate change, wind energy represents an important alternative to oil and gas extraction to meet increasing energy demands, but it has the potential to disrupt wildlife populations. Because behavioral adjustments, such as altered habitat selection, are a primary way that long‐lived species respond to novel disturbances, we evaluated...
Article
Full-text available
Our understanding of ungulate migration is advancing rapidly due to innovations in modern animal tracking. Herein, we review and synthesize nearly seven decades of work on migration and other long-distance movements of wild ungulates. Although it has long been appreciated that ungulates migrate to enhance access to forage, recent contributions demo...
Article
Full-text available
The forage maturation hypothesis (FMH) states that energy intake for ungulates is maximised when forage biomass is at intermediate levels. Nevertheless, metabolic allometry and different digestive systems suggest that resource selection should vary across ungulate species. By combining GPS relocations with remotely sensed data on forage characteris...
Article
Full-text available
Maintaining functional connectivity is critical for the long‐term conservation of wildlife populations. Landscape genomics provides an opportunity to assess long‐term functional connectivity by relating environmental variables to spatial patterns of genomic variation resulting from generations of movement, dispersal and mating behaviors. Identifyin...
Article
Full-text available
Migration of ungulates (hooved mammals) is a fundamental ecological process that promotes abundant herds, whose effects cascade up and down terrestrial food webs. Migratory ungulates provide the prey base that maintains large carnivore and scavenger populations and underpins terrestrial biodiversity (fig. S1). When ungulates move in large aggregati...
Article
Full-text available
According to risk‐sensitive foraging theory, animals should make foraging decisions that balance nutritional costs and gains to promote fitness. Human disturbance is a form of perceived risk that can prompt avoidance of risky habitat over acquisition of food. Consequently, behavioral responses to perceived risk could induce nutritional costs. Popul...
Article
Full-text available
Birth timing is a key life‐history characteristic that influences fitness and population performance. For migratory animals, however, appropriately timing birth on one seasonal range may be constrained by events occurring during other parts of the migratory cycle. We investigated how the use of capital and income resources may facilitate flexibilit...
Article
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Sexual segregation has been intensely studied across diverse ecosystems and taxa, but studies are often limited to periods when animals occupy distinct seasonal ranges. Some avian and marine studies have revealed that habitat segregation, when sexes differ spatially or temporally in use of the physical landscape, is common during the migratory peri...
Article
Full-text available
Resource limitation at the population level is a function of forage quality and its abundance relative to its per capita availability, which in turn, determines nutritional condition of individuals. Effects of resource limitation on population dynamics in ungulates often occur through predictable and sequential changes in vital rates, which can ena...
Article
Full-text available
While the tendency to return to previously visited locations – termed ‘site fidelity’ – is common in animals, the cause of this behaviour is not well understood. One hypothesis is that site fidelity is shaped by an animal’s environment, such that animals living in landscapes with predictable resources have stronger site fidelity. Site fidelity may...
Article
For ungulates and other long‐lived species, life‐history theory predicts that nutritional reserves are allocated to reproduction in a state‐dependent manner because survival is highly conserved. Further, as per‐capita food abundance and nutritional reserves decline (i.e., density‐dependence intensifies), reproduction and recruitment become increasi...
Article
Animal populations face increased threats to mobility and access to critical habitat from a variety of human disturbances including roads, residential development, agriculture, and energy development. Disturbance from human hunting is known to alter habitat use in ungulates, but recent work suggests that hunting may also trigger the onset of migrat...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Across the western United States, many ungulate herds must migrate seasonally to access resources and avoid harsh winter conditions. Because these migration paths cover vast landscapes (in other words migration distances up to 150 miles [241 kilometers]), they are increasingly threatened by roads, fencing, subdivisions, and other development. Over...
Article
Resource tracking, where animals increase energy gain by moving to track phenological variation in resources across space, is emerging as a fundamental attribute of animal movement ecology. However, a theoretical framework to understand when and where resource tracking should occur, and how resource tracking should lead to emergent ecological patte...
Article
Despite the shared prediction that the width of a population's dietary niche expands as food becomes limiting, the Niche Variation Hypothesis (NVH) and Optimal Foraging Theory (OFT) offer contrasting views about how individuals alter diet selection when food is limited. Classical OFT predicts that dietary preferences do not change as food becomes l...
Article
Animals exhibit a diversity of movement tactics [1]. Tracking resources that change across space and time is predicted to be a fundamental driver of animal movement [2]. For example, some migratory ungulates (i.e., hooved mammals) closely track the progression of highly nutritious plant green-up, a phenomenon called “green-wave surfing” [3, 4, 5]....
Article
Full-text available
Information garnered from the capture and handling of free‐ranging animals helps advance understanding of wildlife ecology and can aid in decisions on wildlife management. Unfortunately, animals may experience increased levels of stress, injuries, and death resulting from captures (e.g., exertional myopathy, trauma). Partial sedation is a technique...
Article
Full-text available
To increase resource gain, many herbivores pace their migration with the flush of nutritious plant green‐up that progresses across the landscape (termed “green‐wave surfing”). Despite concerns about the effects of climate change on migratory species and the critical role of plant phenology in mediating the ability of ungulates to surf, little is kn...
Article
Full-text available
Accurately quantifying species’ area requirements is a prerequisite for effective area‐based conservation. This typically involves collecting tracking data on species of interest and then conducting home‐range analyses. Problematically, autocorrelation in tracking data can result in space needs being severely underestimated. Based on previous work,...
Article
For nearly 2 decades, the forests of the Rocky Mountains in the United States experienced a bark‐beetle (Dendoctronus ponderosae) epidemic. The number of dead and falling trees from this epidemic likely will affect how elk (Cervus canadensis) and hunters use the forest and their interactions. Downed trees potentially create a component of refuge ha...
Article
Full-text available
Animal migrations are ecologically, culturally, and economically important. Ungulate populations in many parts of Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas migrate long distances to access seasonally available resources, traversing vast landscapes in large numbers. Yet some migrations are declining, raising concerns among scientists and natural resour...
Article
Full-text available
Newly emerging plants provide the best forage for herbivores. To exploit this fleeting resource, migrating herbivores align their movements to surf the wave of spring green-up. With new technology to track migrating animals, the Green Wave Hypothesis has steadily gained empirical support across a diversity of migratory taxa. This hypothesis assumes...
Article
Full-text available
From fine‐scale foraging to broad‐scale migration, animal movement is shaped by the distribution of resources. There is mounting evidence, however, that learning and memory also guide movement. Although migratory mammals commonly track resource waves, how resource tracking and memory guide long‐distance migration has not been reconciled. We examine...
Article
Full-text available
Migration is an effective behavioral strategy for prolonging access to seasonal resources and may be a resilient strategy for ungulates experiencing changing climatic conditions. In the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), elk are the primary ungulate, with approximately 20,000 individuals migrating to exploit seasonal gradients in forage while als...
Article
Forests of the Rocky Mountains (USA and Canada) have experienced a large‐scale bark‐beetle (Dendoctronus ponderosae) epidemic that has led to widespread mortality of pine trees, followed by structural and compositional changes to the forest. The millions of dead trees resulting from this event likely have an effect on ecosystem processes, but curre...
Article
Home range estimation is routine practice in ecological research. While advances in animal tracking technology have increased our capacity to collect data to support home range analysis, these same advances have also resulted in increasingly autocorrelated data. Consequently the question of which home range estimator to use on modern, highly autoco...
Article
Full-text available
Vegetation green-up signals the timing of available nutritious plants and shrubs providing high-quality forage for ungulates. In this study, we characterized spatial and temporal patterns of spring phenology and explored how they were related to preceding temperature and moisture conditions. We tested correlations between late winter weather and in...
Article
Long‐distance migration by terrestrial mammals is a phenomenon critical to the persistence of populations, but such migrations are declining globally because of over‐harvest, habitat loss, and movement barriers. Increasingly, there is a need to improve existing routes, mitigate route segments affected by anthropogenic disturbance, and in some insta...
Article
Full-text available
Rapid climate and human land-use change may limit the ability of long-distance migratory herbivores to optimally track or ‘surf’ high-quality forage during spring green-up. Understanding how anthropogenic and environmental stressors influence migratory movements is of critical importance because of their potential to cause a mismatch between the ti...
Article
Ungulate migrations are assumed to stem from learning and cultural transmission of information regarding seasonal distribution of forage, but this hypothesis has not been tested empirically. We compared the migratory propensities of bighorn sheep and moose translocated into novel habitats with those of historical populations that had persisted for...
Article
Full-text available
A “landscape of fear” (LOF) is a map that describes continuous spatial variation in an animal's perception of predation risk. The relief on this map reflects, for example, places that an animal avoids to minimize risk. Although the LOF concept is a potentially unifying theme in ecology that is often invoked to explain the ecological and conservatio...
Article
Full-text available
Ungulates are key components in ecosystems and economically important for sport and subsistence harvest. Yet the relative importance of the effects of weather conditions, forage productivity, and carnivores on ungulates are not well understood. We examined changes in elk (Cervus canadensis) recruitment (indexed as age ratios) across 7 states and 3...
Article
Full-text available
Migratory ungulates are often exposed to anthropogenic infrastructure along their migration routes. Understanding the influence of such development on migratory behavior is critical to successful planning and conservation. Impermeable barriers have obvious and detrimental effects to migratory ungulate populations, but the influence of semi-permeabl...
Article
Full-text available
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint wer...
Article
Full-text available
Each spring, migratory herbivores around the world track or ‘surf’ green waves of newly emergent vegetation to distant summer or wet-season ranges. This foraging tactic may help explain the great abundance of migratory herbivores on many seasonal landscapes. However, the underlying fitness benefits of this life-history strategy remain poorly unders...
Preprint
Full-text available
A bstract A ‘landscape of fear’ (LOF) is a map that describes continuous spatial variation in an animal’s perception of predation risk. The relief on this map reflects, for example, places that an animal avoids to minimize risk. Although the LOF concept is a potential unifying theme in ecology that is often invoked to explain the ecological and con...
Article
Full-text available
Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), and moose (Alces alces shirasi) in North America. In southeastern Wyoming average annual CWD prevalence in mule deer exceeds 20% and appe...
Article
Full-text available
Disease models typically focus on temporal dynamics of infection, while often neglecting environmental processes that determine host movement. In many systems, however, temporal disease dynamics may be slow compared to the scale at which environmental conditions alter host space-use and accelerate disease transmission. Using a mechanistic movement...
Article
Full-text available
Glucocorticoids (GC) and triiodothyronine (T3) are two endocrine markers commonly used to quantify resource limitation, yet the relationships between these markers and the energetic state of animals has been studied primarily in small-bodied species in captivity. Free-ranging animals, however, adjust energy intake in accordance with their energy re...
Article
Full-text available
The persistence of many migratory ungulate populations worldwide is threatened due to anthropogenic impacts to seasonal ranges and migration routes. While many studies have linked migratory ungulate declines to migration disruption or loss, very few have explored the underlying factors that determine whether a population perishes or persists. In so...
Article
Full-text available
The Green Wave Hypothesis posits that herbivore migration manifests in response to waves of spring green-up (i.e. green-wave surfing). Nonetheless, empirical support for the Green Wave Hypothesis is mixed, and a framework for understanding variation in surfing is lacking. In a population of migratory mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), 31% surfed plan...
Article
Full-text available
Partial migration occurs across a variety of taxa and has important ecological and evolutionary consequences. Among ungulates, studies of partially migratory populations have allowed researchers to compare and contrast performance metrics of migrants versus residents and examine how environmental factors influence the relative abundance of each. Su...
Article
Aim Elucidating patterns in species responses to habitat fragmentation is an important focus of ecology and conservation, but studies are often geographically restricted, taxonomically narrow or use indirect measures of species vulnerability. We investigated predictors of species presence after fragmentation using data from studies around the world...
Article
Full-text available
Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an invariably fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk, and moose. Despite a 100% fatality rate, areas of high prevalence, and increasingly expanding geographic endemic areas, little is known about the population-level effects of CWD in deer. To investigate these effects, we...
Data
Causes of Mortality. Cause of mortality by sex and chronic wasting disease (CWD)-status of white-tailed deer captured, CWD-tested annually, radio-collared, and monitored by radio-telemetry on Deer Creek Drainage, southwest of Glenrock, WY (2003–2010). The χ2 analysis determined if CWD-positive deer were over-represented in mortality data based on 2...
Data
Study Area Map. The study area, including Deer Creek drainage and VR Ranch southwest of Glenrock, Wyoming where deer were captured, tested for chronic wasting disease, marked with radio transmitters, and tracked by radio telemetry (2003–2010). (TIF)
Data
Pregnancy Data Used in Analyses. (XLSX)
Data
Recruitment Data Used in Analyses. (XLSX)
Data
Incidence Data Used in Analyses. (XLSX)
Data
Leslie Matrix Population Model Sensitivity and Elasticity. Sensitivity and elasticity analysis of the 18 x 18 transition matrix, A, for the Leslie matrix population model for a chronic wasting disease (CWD)-endemic white-tailed deer population captured, CWD-tested annually, radio-collared, and monitored by radio-telemetry SW of Glenrock, WY (2003–2...
Data
Survival Data Used in Analyses. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
The green wave hypothesis (GWH) states that migrating animals should track or ‘surf’ high-quality forage at the leading edge of spring green-up. To index such high-quality forage, recent work proposed the instantaneous rate of green-up (IRG), i.e. rate of change in the normalized difference vegetation index over time. Despite this important advance...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past two decades, populations of Shiras moose (Alces alces shirasi) in western Wyoming have declined. Recent work on the Jackson herd in northwest Wyoming suggests that the 1988 Yellowstone fires and regional drought contributed to a considerable decline in calf recruitment, which coincided with the recovery of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past two decades, populations of Shiras moose (Alces alces shirasi) in western Wyoming have declined. Recent work on the Jackson herd in northwest Wyoming suggests that the 1988 Yellowstone fires and regional drought contributed to a considerable decline in calf recruitment, which coincided with the recovery of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos...
Article
Full-text available
Time can be a limiting constraint for consumers, particularly when resource phenology mediates foraging opportunity. Though a large body of research has explored how resource phenology influences trophic interactions, this work has focused on the topics of trophic mismatch or predator swamping, which typically occur over short periods, at small spa...