Matthew T Kasson

Matthew T Kasson
West Virginia University | WVU · Division of Plant and Soil Sciences

Ph.D. Plant Pathology

About

71
Publications
25,923
Reads
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1,122
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2014 - present
West Virginia University
Position
  • Research Assistant
July 2012 - June 2014
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Position
  • Research Associate
August 2007 - June 2012
Pennsylvania State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2007 - June 2012
Pennsylvania State University
Field of study
  • Plant Pathology
May 2005 - August 2007
University of Maine
Field of study
  • Forestry
September 2003 - May 2005
University of Maine
Field of study
  • Forest Ecosystem Science

Publications

Publications (71)
Article
Millipedes (Diplopoda) are well known for their toxic or repellent defensive secretions. Here, we describe (6aR,10aS,10bR)-8,8-dimethyldodecahydropyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinoline [trans-anti-trans-deoxybuzonamine (1a)] and (rel-6aR,10aR,10bR)-8,8-dimethyldodecahydropyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinoline [trans-syn-cis-deoxybuzonamine (1b)], two isomers of deoxybuzon...
Article
The Ambrosia Fusarium Clade (AFC) is a monophyletic lineage within clade 3 of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) that currently comprises 19 genealogically exclusive species. These fungi are known or predicted to be farmed by adult female Euwallacea ambrosia beetles as a nutritional mutualism (Coleoptera: Scolytinae; Xyleborini). To date, o...
Article
Full-text available
Plant–pathogen interactions are often considered in a pairwise manner with minimal consideration of the impacts of the broader endophytic community on disease progression and/or outcomes for disease agents and hosts. Community interactions may be especially relevant in the context of disease complexes (i.e., interacting or functionally redundant ca...
Article
Many fungi transform host tissues to benefit their own reproduction. A recent study investigates a fungus that converts its plant host’s reproductive tissues into ornate flower mimics. These ‘pseudoflowers’ present complex cues that may enlist insects to facilitate fungal dispersal.
Preprint
Full-text available
Plant-pathogen interactions are often considered in a pairwise manner with minimal consideration of the impacts of the broader endophytic community on disease progression and/or outcomes for disease agents and hosts. Community interactions may be especially relevant in the context of disease complexes (i.e, interacting or functionally redundant cau...
Article
Full-text available
Of 1882 fungal species described in 2019, only 3.5% were animal-associated. This percentage is representative of the poor understanding we have of this group of fungi, which are ephemeral, sometimes inconspicuous, and difficult to access, while often requiring specialized methods for their study. Following a two-session symposium on animal-associat...
Article
Full-text available
Scientific communication is facilitated by a data-driven, scientifically sound taxonomy that considers the end-user's needs and established successful practice. Previously (Geiser et al. 2013; Phytopathology 103:400-408. 2013), the Fusarium community voiced near unanimous support for a concept of Fusarium that represented a clade comprising all agr...
Article
Full-text available
Social media is an increasingly important professional tool for scientists. In particular, scientists use their social media profiles to communicate science and build communities with like-minded scientists and nonscientists. These networks include journalists who can amplify social media science communication, disseminating it to new audiences on-...
Article
The Nectriaceae includes numerous canker pathogens. Due to the scarcity of ascomata on many hosts, comprehensive surveys are lacking. Here we characterize the diversity of perithecia-producing nectriaceous fungi across the central Appalachians in eastern North America. Nine species from eleven hosts were recovered including a novel Corinectria sp....
Article
Full-text available
Neonectria ditissima and N. faginata are canker pathogens involved in an insect-fungus disease complex of American beech (Fagus grandifolia) in North America commonly known as beech bark disease (BBD). In Europe, both N. ditissima and N. coccinea are involved in BBD on European beech (Fagus sylvatica). Field observations across the range of BBD ind...
Article
Full-text available
Symbiosis can facilitate the development of specialized organs in the host body to maintain relationships with beneficial microorganisms. To understand the developmental and genetic mechanisms by which such organs develop, it is critical to first investigate the morphology and developmental timing of these structures during the onset of host develo...
Article
In Mediterranean Europe and the United States, oak species (Quercus spp.) have been in various states of decline for the past several decades. Several insect pests and pathogens contribute to this decline to varying degrees including Phytophthora cinnamomi, Armillaria spp., various insect defoliators, and additionally in the U.S., the oak wilt path...
Article
Full-text available
“The retention of the power of locomotion is of great importance in so far as the spread of the disease is concerned. It enables the insects not only before the abdomen has ruptured, but even after the fruiting layer has been exposed and, during the time the conidia are being discharged, to wander over the trees and distribute the spores in a far m...
Article
Full-text available
One of the main threats to forests in the Anthropocene are novel or altered interactions among trees, insects and fungi. To critically assess the contemporary research on bark beetles, their associated fungi, and their relationships with trees, the international Bark Beetle Mycobiome research coordination network has been formed. The network compri...
Article
Full-text available
The fungal genus Massospora (Zoopagomycota: Entomophthorales) includes more than a dozen obligate, sexually transmissible pathogenic species that infect cicadas (Hemiptera) worldwide. At least two species are known to produce psychoactive compounds during infection, which has garnered considerable interest for this enigmatic genus. As with many Ent...
Preprint
Full-text available
In Mediterranean Europe and the United States, oak species ( Quercus spp.) have been in various states of decline for the past several decades. Several insect pests and pathogens contribute to this decline to varying degrees including Phytophthora cinnamomi , Armillaria spp., various insect defoliators, and additionally in the U.S., the oak wilt pa...
Article
Our discovery of ergot alkaloids in fungi of the genus Metarhizium has agricultural and pharmaceutical implications. Ergot alkaloids produced by other fungi in the family Clavicipitaceae accumulate in forage grasses or grain crops; in this context they are considered toxins, though their presence also may deter or kill insect pests. Our data report...
Article
Ailanthus altissima, perhaps the best-known example of an entrenched invasive weed tree in North America, was introduced to the Eastern U.S. roughly 240 years ago. The biological control of A. altissima has been a topic of interest since the discovery of a destructive naturally occurring Verticillium wilt disease of A. altissima in 2002. After near...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Nectriaceae contains numerous canker pathogens. Due to scarcity of ascomata on many hosts, comprehensive surveys are lacking. Here we characterize the diversity of perithecia-producing nectriaceous fungi across the central Appalachians. Ten species from twelve hosts were recovered including a novel Corinectria sp. from Picea rubens . Neonectria...
Preprint
Neonectria ditissima and N. faginata are canker pathogens involved in an insect-fungus disease complex of American beech ( Fagus grandifolia ) commonly known as beech bark disease (BBD). In Europe, both N. ditissima and N. coccinea are involved in BBD on European beech ( Fagus sylvatica ). Field observations across the range of BBD indicate that ne...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Diplodia corticola (Dc) has emerged as an important canker pathogen of oaks in the United States with introductions to Maine, Massachusetts, West Virginia, Florida, and California since 2010. In 2014, symptomatic red oaks (Quercus rubra) were observed in Seneca State Forest (SSF), WV, exhibiting premature leaf drop with associated branch dieback, b...
Preprint
Full-text available
The fungal genus Massospora (Zoopagomycota: Entomophthorales) includes more than a dozen obligate, sexually transmissible pathogenic species that infect cicadas (Hemiptera) worldwide. At least two species are known to produce psychoactive compounds during infection, which has garnered considerable interest for this enigmatic genus. As with many Ent...
Article
Entomopathogenic fungi routinely kill their hosts before releasing infectious spores, but a few species keep insects alive while sporulating, which enhances dispersal. Transcriptomics- and metabolomics-based studies of entomopathogens with post-mortem dissemination from their parasitized hosts have unraveled infection processes and host responses....
Article
Fungivorous millipedes (subterclass Colobognatha) likely represent some of the earliest known mycophagous terrestrial arthropods, yet their fungal partners remain elusive. Here we describe relationships between fungi and the fungivorous millipede, Brachycybe lecontii. Their fungal community is surprisingly diverse, including 176 genera, 39 orders,...
Article
Full-text available
The Ambrosia Fusarium Clade (AFC) comprises at least 16 genealogically exclusive species-level lineages within clade 3 of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC). These fungi are either known or predicted to be farmed by Asian Euwallacea ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in the tribe Xyleborini as a source of nutrition. To...
Article
Full-text available
Horizontal transmission of virulence attenuating hypoviruses of Cryphonectria parasitica is restricted by an allorecognition system termed vegetative incompatibility (vic). A super donor formulation of two engineered C. parasitica strains (SD328/SD82) with gene disruptions at four of six vic loci transmitted hypovirus to strains in the laboratory i...
Article
Full-text available
Verticillium nonalfalfae , a cosmopolitan soil-borne phytopathogen, causes vascular wilt in agricultural crops and perennial woody plants. Select strains of V. nonalfalfae can cause lethal disease in the invasive tree Ailanthus altissima and several have since been utilized as a biological control (biocontrol) against this widespread invader. Here,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Fungivorous millipedes (subterclass Colobognatha) likely represent some of the earliest known mycophagous terrestrial arthropods, yet their fungal partners remain elusive. Here we describe relationships between fungi and the fungivorous millipede, Brachycybe lecontii . Their fungal community is surprisingly diverse with 176 genera, 39 orders, and f...
Article
Full-text available
Ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae) rely on a symbiosis with fungi for their nutrition. Symbiotic fungi are preserved and transported in specialized storage structures called mycangia. Although pivotal in the symbiosis, mycangia have been notoriously difficult to study, given their minute size and membranous st...
Preprint
Full-text available
Entomopathogenic fungi routinely kill their hosts before releasing infectious conidia, but select species keep their hosts alive while sporulating to enhance spore dispersal. Recent expression and metabolomics studies involving host-killing entomopathogens have helped unravel infection processes and host responses, yet the mechanisms underlying act...
Article
Full-text available
Ambrosia beetles in the subfamily Platypodinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) have been farming fungi for over 50 million y, yet they remain understudied and most of their fungal symbionts are unknown. We identified fungal communities associated with all four platypodine species native to the southeastern United States: Euplatypus compositus, Euplatyp...
Article
Full-text available
Species of Geosmithia are cosmopolitan but understudied fungi, and most are associated with phloem-feeding bark beetles on various woody hosts. We surveyed 207 bark and ambrosia beetles from 37 species in the eastern USA for associated fungi. The community is dominated by species in the G. pallida species complex (GPSC), and included several Geosmi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Diplodia corticola (Dc) has emerged as an important canker pathogen of oaks in the US with introductions to ME, MA, WV, FL, and CA since 2010. In 2014, symptomatic red oaks (Quercus rubra) were observed in Seneca State Forest (SSF), WV exhibiting premature leaf drop with associated branch dieback, bleeding cankers and mortality. Wood plugs were sam...
Article
Full-text available
Transgenic hypovirulent strains of Cryphonectria parasitica, the chestnut blight fungus, engineered to contain a chromosomally integrated full-length infectious cDNA copy of virulence-attenuating hypoviruses, differ from natural hypovirulent strains in the ability to transmit hypoviruses to ascospore progeny and with 100% efficiency through asexual...
Article
Full-text available
The success of some invasive tree species is attributed, in part, to high fecundity in the form of sexual propagules. If invasive trees produce more seed annually than co-occurring native trees, they will have a greater ability to disperse and establish across the landscape. In this study, seed production of female Ailanthus trees was investigated...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last decade, Diplodia corticola (Dc) has emerged as an important canker pathogen of oaks (Quercus spp.) in the U.S. (Aćimović et al. 2016, Dreaden et al. 2011, and Lynch et al. 2013) and Europe (Linaldeddu et al. 2013). In fall 2014, large overstory Q. rubra with premature leaf browning and drop, bleeding / sooty bark cankers, and associat...
Article
Full-text available
Euwallacea fornicatus (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is an emerging invasive tree pest, but its native distribution remains incompletely known because minimal records have been published from China. We report the distribution of E. fornicatus in China from records in the National Zoological Museum of China and from our own samples, includin...
Article
Ambrosia beetles and fungi represent an interesting and economically important symbiosis, but the vast majority of ambrosia fungi remain unexplored, hindering research, management of pathogens, and mitigation of invasive species. Beetles in the subtribe Premnobiini are one example of an entire beetle lineage whose fungal symbionts have never been s...
Article
Full-text available
Most wood-boring insects compete with wood decaying basidiomycetes for woody biomass. One clade of ambrosia beetles gained access to rotten wood – an abundant resource unsuitable to most wood-boring insects – by evolving a farming-like mutualism with a white rot polypore. Here we show the mutualist of Ambrosiodmus/Ambrosiophilus, the polypore Flavo...
Article
Full-text available
Several species of the ambrosia beetle Euwallacea (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) cultivate Ambrosia Fusarium Clade (AFC) species in their galleries as a source of food. Like all other scolytine beetles in the tribe Xyleborini, Euwallacea are thought to be obligate mutualists with their fungal symbionts. Published diversification-time estim...
Article
Full-text available
Canker disease of prickly ash (Zanthoxylum bungeanum) has caused a decline in the production of this economically important spice in northern China in the past 25 y. To identify the etiological agent, 38 fungal isolates were recovered from symptomatic tissues from trees in five provinces in China. These isolates were identified by conducting BLASTN...
Article
Full-text available
Fusarium euwallaceae is a well-characterized fungal symbiont of the exotic ambrosia beetle Euwallacea sp. (polyphagous shot hole borer [PSHB]), together inciting Fusarium dieback on many host plants in Israel and California. Recent discoveries of additional fungal symbionts within ambrosia beetle mycangia suggest these fungi occur as communities. C...
Article
Asian Euwallacea ambrosia beetles vector Fusarium mutualists. The ambrosial fusaria are all members of the Ambrosia Fusarium Clade (AFC) within the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC). Several Euwallacea-Fusarium mutualists have been introduced into non-native regions and have caused varying degrees of damage to orchard, landscape and forest tre...
Article
Full-text available
Ambrosia symbiosis is an obligate, farming-like mutualism between wood-boring beetles and fungi. It evolved at least 11 times and includes many notorious invasive pests. All ambrosia beetles studied to date cultivate ascomycotan fungi: early colonizers of recently killed trees with poor wood digestion. Beetles in the widespread genus Ambrosiodmus,...
Article
Symptoms consistent with thatch collapse have been observed on golf courses in New Zealand and the United States. Symptoms include circular patches ranging from 8 to 46 cm in diameter, which result in a depression in golf turf stands of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), annual bluegrass (Poa annua), and browntop bentgrass (Agrostis capilla...
Article
Full-text available
Chestnut blight is a devastating disease of Castanea spp. Mycoviruses that reduce virulence (hypovirulence) of the causative agent, Cryphonectria parasitica, can be used to manage chestnut blight. However, vegetative incompatibility (vic) barriers that restrict anastomosis-mediated virus transmission hamper hypovirulence efficacy. In order to effec...
Article
The naturally occurring Verticillium nonalfalfae has been proposed as a biocontrol agent against the highly invasive Ailanthus altissima in the eastern U.S. We tested 71 non-target woody species for susceptibility to the potential biocontrol agent. In the field, only devil’s walkingstick (17% incidence) and striped maple (3%) acquired infections th...
Article
Colletotrichum fioriniae is a member of the large cosmopolitan C. acutatum species complex (2). Known agricultural hosts of C. acutatum include apple, European blueberry, grape, olive, papaya, and strawberry (2). In contrast, the life history of C. fioriniae ranges from an epizootic of certain scale insect populations to an endophyte of plants (3,4...
Article
Full-text available
Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a lethal disease caused by the fungus Geosmithia morbida (Tisserat, et al. 2009). The fungus is vectored by the walnut twig beetle (WTB; Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)), which carries the fungus as it tunnels beneath the bark, causing small cankers to form (Kolařik, et al. 2011). Repeated...
Article
Verticillium wilt, caused by Verticillium nonalfalfae, is currently killing tens of thousands of highly invasive Ailanthus altissima within the forests in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Virginia and is being considered as a biological control agent of Ailanthus. However, little is known about the pathogenicity and virulence of V. nonalfalfae isolates from...
Article
Verticillium wilt of the highly invasive tree-of-heaven [Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle], caused by Verticillium nonalfalfae Interbitzin et al. (1), formerly classified as V. albo-atrum Reinke and Berthold, has been reported in the United States from two states: Pennsylvania (2) and Virginia (3). Infected A. altissima in both states exhibited...
Article
Full-text available
Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle, commonly known as tree-of-heaven, is an invasive tree spe