Matthew David Jones

Matthew David Jones
UNSW Sydney | UNSW · Exercise Physiology

PhD, MSc, BExPhys

About

52
Publications
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417
Citations

Publications

Publications (52)
Article
Full-text available
Objectives To evaluate (1) the feasibility of an audit-feedback intervention to facilitate sports science journal policy change, (2) the reliability of the Transparency of Research Underpinning Social Intervention Tiers (TRUST) policy evaluation form, and (3) the extent to which policies of sports science journals support transparent and open resea...
Article
Full-text available
Research must be well designed, properly conducted and clearly and transparently reported. Our independent medical research institute wanted a simple, generic tool to assess the quality of the research conducted by its researchers, with the goal of identifying areas that could be improved through targeted educational activities. Unfortunately, none...
Article
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Randomized clinical trials attempt to reduce bias and create similar groups at baseline to infer causal effects. In meta-analyses, baseline imbalance may threaten the validity of the treatment effects. This meta-epidemiological study examined baseline imbalance in comparisons of exercise and antihypertensive medicines. Baseline data for systolic bl...
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Objective: To explore the effectiveness of a modified fear hierarchy on measuring improvements in movement-associated fear in chronic low back pain. Methods: A modified 3-item fear hierarchy was created and implemented based on principles of graded exposure. This study was an exploratory analysis of the modified 3-item fear hierarchy from a larg...
Article
Background Contemporary management of chronic low back pain involves combined exercise and pain education. Currently, there is a gap in the literature for whether any exercise mode better pairs with pain education. The purpose of this study was to compare general callisthenic exercise with a powerlifting style programme, both paired with consistent...
Article
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Objectives: To explore how Australian exercise physiologists (EPs) utilise pain neuroscience education (PNE) in their management of patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: A semi-structured interview concerning a knee osteoarthritis vignette was designed to understand each participant's beliefs about physical activity, pain, injury and copin...
Article
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Objective To determine how well exercise interventions are reported in trials in health and disease. Design Overview of systematic reviews. Data sources PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and PsycINFO from inception until June 2021. Eligibility criteria Reviews of any health condition were included if they primarily assessed quality of exercise...
Article
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Background Resistance training is the gold standard exercise mode for accrual of lean muscle mass, but the isolated effect of resistance training on body fat is unknown.Objectives This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated resistance training for body composition outcomes in healthy adults. Our primary outcome was body fat percentage; secon...
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Introduction Clinician time and resources may be underutilised if the treatment they offer does not match patient expectations and attitudes. We developed a questionnaire (AxEL-Q) to guide clinicians toward elements of first-line care that are pertinent to their patients with low back pain. Methods We used guidance from the COSMIN consortium to de...
Article
Objectives This meta-analysis aims to investigate the efficacy and safety of medicines that target neurotrophic factors for low back pain (LBP) or sciatica. Methods We searched published and trial registry reports of randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of medicines that target neurotrophic factors to LBP or sciatica in seven databas...
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Pain is experienced by people with cancer during treatment and in survivorship. Exercise can have an acute hypoalgesic effect (exercise-induced hypoalgesia; EIH) in healthy individuals and some chronic pain states. However, EIH, and the moderating effect of exercise intensity, has not been investigated in cancer survivors. This study examined the e...
Article
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Introduction: Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is pain that has persisted for greater than three months. It is common and burdensome and represents a significant proportion of primary health presentations. For the majority of people with CLBP, a specific nociceptive contributor cannot be reliably identified, and the pain is categorised as 'non-specifi...
Article
Background and Aims This cross-sectional study evaluated the nature of pain curriculum being taught in accredited exercise physiology degrees across Australian universities and its perceived usefulness for preparing exercise physiologists to treat people with chronic pain. Materials & Methods Universities and graduates were asked about the nature...
Article
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Reductions in blood pressure (BP) induced by exercise training may be associated with the acute reduction in BP observed minutes to hours following an exercise session, termed post-exercise hypotension (PEH). However, the magnitude and time-course of PEH, including the optimal exercise characteristics to maximise it, are still unclear. Using a rand...
Article
High blood pressure (BP) is a global health challenge. Isometric resistance training (IRT) has demonstrated antihypertensive effects, but safety data are not available, thereby limiting its recommendation for clinical use. We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials comparing IRT to controls in adults with elevated BP (systolic...
Article
Progressive resistance training (PRT) and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) improve cardiometabolic health in older adults. Whether combination PRT+HIIT (COMB) provides similar or additional benefit is less clear. This systematic review with meta-analysis of controlled trials examined effects of PRT, HIIT and COMB compared to non-exercise con...
Article
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Objective To investigate the efficacy, acceptability, and safety of muscle relaxants for low back pain. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Medline, Embase, CINAHL, CENTRAL, ClinicalTrials.gov, clinicialtrialsregister.eu, and WHO ICTRP from inception to 23 February 2021. Eligibility criteria f...
Article
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Exercise and pain neuroscience education (PNE) have both been used as standalone treatments for chronic musculoskeletal pain. The evidence supporting PNE as an adjunct to exercise therapy is growing but remains unclear. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of combining PNE and exercise for patients with chr...
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High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is effective for generating positive cardiovascular health and fitness benefits. This study compared HIIT and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) for affective state and enjoyment in sedentary males with overweight or obesity. Twenty-eight participants performed stationary cycling for 6 weeks × 3 se...
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Background Reductions in muscle size and strength occur with aging. These changes can be mitigated by participation in resistance training. At present, it is unknown if sex contributes to differences in adaptation to resistance training in older adults. Objective The aim of this systematic review was to determine if sex differences are apparent in...
Article
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Background Antidepressant medicines are used to manage symptoms of low back pain. The efficacy, acceptability, and safety of antidepressant medicines for low back pain (LBP) are not clear. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy, acceptability, and safety of antidepressant medicines for LBP. Methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Clinical...
Article
Background Exercise is recommended for the management of chronic low back pain (CLBP). Trialists have proposed numerous mechanisms to explain why exercise improves pain and function in people with CLBP, but these are yet to be synthesised. Objective To synthesise the proposed mechanisms of benefit for exercise in people with CLBP. Design Review....
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Background There is limited evidence for the comparative effectiveness of analgesic medicines for adults with low back pain. This systematic review and network meta-analysis aims to determine the analgesic effect, safety, acceptability, effect on function, and relative rank according to analgesic effect, safety, acceptability, and effect on functio...
Article
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Exercise and physical activity is recommended treatment for a wide range of chronic pain conditions. In addition to several well-documented effects on physical and mental health, 8 to 12 weeks of exercise therapy can induce clinically relevant reductions in pain. However, exercise can also induce hypoalgesia after as little as 1 session, which is c...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Low back pain (LBP) is the leading cause of years lived with disability worldwide. Most people with LBP receive the diagnosis of non-specific LBP or sciatica. Medications are commonly prescribed but have limited analgesic effects and are associated with adverse events. A novel treatment approach is to target neurotrophins such as nerve g...
Article
Full-text available
Background Low back pain (LBP) is the leading cause of years lived with disability worldwide. Most people with LBP receive the diagnosis of nonspecific LBP or sciatica. Medications are commonly prescribed but have limited analgesic effects and are associated with adverse events. A novel treatment approach is to target neurotrophins such as nerve gr...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Clinical guidelines for the non‐surgical management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend exercise and education. This study aimed to evaluate the extent to which accredited exercise physiologists (AEPs) deliver exercise and education for knee OA and how it aligns with clinical practice guidelines. Design Cross‐sectional survey. Method...
Article
Full-text available
Exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) is a reduction in pain that occurs during or following exercise. Randomised controlled studies published from 1980 to January 2020 that examined experimentally induced pain before and during/following a single bout of exercise in healthy individuals or people with chronic musculoskeletal pain were systematically r...
Article
Objective To review and assess the methodological quality of randomised controlled trials that test physical therapy interventions for low back pain. Study Design and Setting Systematic review of trials of physical therapy interventions to prevent or treat low back pain (of any duration or type) in participants of any age indexed on the Physiother...
Article
Objective: Investigate the association between physical activity and pain severity in individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Design: Cross-sectional; systematic review with meta-analyses. Methods: Thirty-one participants with knee osteoarthritis underwent assessment of symptoms via self-report questionnaires and quantitative sensory testing. Fo...
Article
The optimal exercise-training characteristics for reducing blood pressure (BP) are unclear. We investigated the effects of 6-weeks of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) on BP and aortic stiffness in males with overweight or obesity. Twenty-eight participants (18–45 years; BMI: 25–35 kg/m2) perfo...
Article
Objectives The hypoalgesic effects of exercise are well described, but there are conflicting findings for different modalities of pain; in particular for mechanical vs thermal noxious stimuli, which are the most commonly used in studies of exercise-induced hypoalgesia. The aims of this study were 1) to investigate the effect of aerobic exercise on...
Article
Purpose To investigate the chronic and acute effects of high‐intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate‐intensity continuous training (MICT) on pressure pain thresholds (PPT) in overweight males. Methods Twenty‐eight participants performed stationary cycling exercise 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Participants were randomly allocated to HIIT (...
Article
Perspective: This study shows that preceding a bout of exercise with pain education can alter pain responses after exercise. This finding has potential clinical implications for exercise prescription for people with chronic pain whereby pain education before exercise could be used to improve pain responses to that exercise.
Article
Purpose: Neural adaptations to strength training have long been recognized, but knowledge of mechanisms remains incomplete. Using novel techniques and a design which limited experimental bias, this study examined if 4 weeks of strength training alters voluntary activation and corticospinal transmission. Methods: Twenty-one subjects were randomiz...
Article
Animal studies have demonstrated an important role of peripheral mechanisms as contributors to exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH). Whether these same mechanisms contribute to EIH in humans is not known. In the current study, pain thresholds were assessed in healthy volunteers ( n = 36) before and after 5 min of high-intensity leg cycling exercise a...
Article
Full-text available
Exercise-induced hypoalgesia is well described, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials, laser evoked potentials, pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds. These were recorded before and after 3-min of isometric elbow flexion exercise at 40% o...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: In healthy individuals and people with chronic pain, an inverse association between physical activity level and pain has been reported. Associations between objectively measured fitness and pain have also been found in people with chronic pain, but it is not clear whether the same relations are apparent in healthy individuals. The purpo...
Article
Full-text available
The hypoalgesic effects of acute exercise are well documented. However, the effect of chronic exercise training on pain sensitivity is largely unknown. To examine the effect of aerobic exercise training on pain sensitivity in healthy individuals. Pressure pain threshold, ischemic pain tolerance and pain ratings during ischemia were assessed in 24 p...

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