Matthew William Jones

Matthew William Jones
University of East Anglia | UEA · Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research

PhD

About

28
Publications
22,756
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3,390
Citations

Publications

Publications (28)
Chapter
There are increasing concerns (and evolving agreements) over the emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere and it is consequently important to have accurate inventories of these emissions. With emphasis on the most important of the greenhouse gases, CO2, this chapter describes and gives examples of how inventories are prepared and discusses so...
Article
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Recent wildfire outbreaks around the world have prompted concern that climate change is increasing fire incidence, threatening human livelihood and biodiversity, and perpetuating climate change. Here, we review current understanding of the impacts of climate change on fire weather (weather conditions conducive to the ignition and spread of wildfire...
Article
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Regional land carbon budgets provide insights into the spatial distribution of the land uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide and can be used to evaluate carbon cycle models and to define baselines for land-based additional mitigation efforts. The scientific community has been involved in providing observation-based estimates of regional carbon budg...
Article
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Recently identified post-fire carbon fluxes indicate that, to understand whether global fires represent a net carbon source or sink, one must consider both terrestrial carbon retention through pyrogenic carbon production and carbon losses via multiple pathways. Here these legacy source and sink pathways are quantified using a CMIP6 land surface mod...
Article
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p>Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere in a changing climate is critical to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe and synthesize datasets...
Preprint
Full-text available
Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere in a changing climate is critical to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe and synthesize data sets...
Article
Full-text available
Five years after the adoption of the Paris Climate Agreement, growth in global CO2 emissions has begun to falter. The pervasive disruptions from the COVID-19 pandemic have radically altered the trajectory of global CO2 emissions. Contradictory effects of the post-COVID-19 investments in fossil fuel-based infrastructure and the recent strengthening...
Article
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Quantification of CO 2 fluxes at the Earth’s surface is required to evaluate the causes and drivers of observed increases in atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. Atmospheric inversion models disaggregate observed variations in atmospheric CO 2 concentration to variability in CO 2 emissions and sinks. They require prior constraints fossil CO 2 emissions...
Preprint
Full-text available
Wildfires generally result in biospheric recovery approximating the pre-disturbance state. However legacy carbon(C) gains and losses that have until now been overlooked in global-scale theory and modelling indicate that post-fire C gains through pyrogenic carbon (PyC) production, and losses via fire regime shifts, post-fire mortality, topsoil loss...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere in a changing climate – the “global carbon budget” – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we de...
Preprint
Full-text available
Regional land carbon budgets provide insights on the spatial distribution of the land uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and can be used to evaluate carbon cycle models and to define baselines for land-based additional mitigation efforts. The scientific community has been involved in providing observation-based estimates of regional carbon budge...
Article
Full-text available
Vegetation fires play an important role in global and regional carbon cycles. Due to climate warming and land use shifts, fire patterns are changing and fire impacts increasing in many of the world's regions. Reducing uncertainties in carbon budgeting calculations from fires is therefore fundamental to advance our current understanding and forecast...
Article
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Government policies during the COVID-19 pandemic have drastically altered patterns of energy demand around the world. Many international borders were closed and populations were confined to their homes, which reduced transport and changed consumption patterns. Here we compile government policies and activity data to estimate the decrease in CO2 emi...
Article
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An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
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Black carbon (BC) is a recalcitrant form of organic carbon (OC) produced by landscape fires. BC is an important component of the global carbon cycle because, compared to unburned biogenic OC, it is selectively conserved in terrestrial and oceanic pools. Here we show that the dissolved BC (DBC) content of dissolved OC (DOC) is twice greater in major...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere – the “global carbon budget” – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and m...
Article
Full-text available
Riverine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contains charcoal byproducts, termed black carbon (BC). To determine the significance of BC as a sink of atmospheric CO2 and reconcile budgets, the sources and fate of this large, slow-cycling and elusive carbon pool must be constrained. The Amazon River is a significant part of global BC cycling because it e...
Article
Full-text available
Landscape fires burn 3–5 million km2 of the Earth’s surface annually. They emit 2.2 Pg of carbon per year to the atmosphere, but also convert a significant fraction of the burned vegetation biomass into pyrogenic carbon. Pyrogenic carbon can be stored in terrestrial and marine pools for centuries to millennia and therefore its production can be con...
Article
Full-text available
Each year, tropical rivers export a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) flux to the global oceans that is equivalent to ~4% of the global land sink for atmospheric CO2. Among the most refractory fractions of terrigenous DOC is dissolved black carbon (DBC), which constitutes ~10% of the total flux and derives from the charcoal and soot (aerosol) produced...
Presentation
Open biomass fires affect 3-4.6 million km2 of the Earth’s surface annually. While the majority of the biomass carbon combusted is emitted as CO2, a nontrivial fraction (up to 28%) is converted to pyrogenic carbon (PyC). The enhanced resistance of PyC to mineralisation leads to part of it being preserved in terrestrial-marine stores, invoking a dra...
Article
Intensive soil tillage is a significant factor in soil organic matter decline in cultivated soils. Both cultivation abandonment and foregoing tillage have been encouraged in the past 30 years to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and soil erosion. However, the dynamic processes of soil organic carbon (SOC) in areas of either continuous cultivation or...
Presentation
Full-text available
Each year around 27 Tg of dissolved BC (DBC) is exported to the global oceans by rivers (Jaffé et al. 2013). Usually, this flux is thought to result from the degradation and mobilisation of BC from soil charcoal stocks in river catchments whilst the input of BC aerosol (soot) to river systems is assumed to be negligible. Global emissions inventorie...
Presentation
Full-text available
Open biomass burning affects 3-4.6 million km 2 globally per year, an area comparable to that of India. While the majority of the vegetation carbon stocks affected by fire are emitted as CO 2 and CO, a nontrivial fraction is converted to pyrogenic carbon (PyC) in the form of charcoal. PyC contains highly recalcitrant organic carbon forms which pers...
Poster
Full-text available
Quantitative ecosystem assessments of wildfires provide a method to assist in the design of the management response. We outline a suite of quantitative methods that will combine to create an overall assessment of the long and short term carbon budget alongside implications for ecosystem recovery estimates. During a fire carbon is released to the at...
Article
Full-text available
The fate of black carbon (BC), a stable form of thermally-altered organic carbon produced during biomass and fuel combustion, remains an area of uncertainty in the global carbon cycle. The transfer of photosynthetically-derived BC into extremely long-term oceanic storage is of particular significance, and rivers are the key linkage between terrestr...
Article
Full-text available
Black carbon (BC) is known to be a potential sink of carbon for the global carbon cycle, particularly if long-term ocean stores are reached. Fluvial transport to the oceans can occur through the dissolution of BC in river water. Evidence from the Paraiba do Sul river basin, Brazil suggests that river DBC concentration is related to charcoal formed...

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