Matthew W Herring

Matthew W Herring
Charles Darwin University | CDU

Doctor of Philosophy

About

17
Publications
1,100
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245
Citations

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Novel, agricultural habitats are increasingly recognised for the conservation opportunities they present. Ricefields show particular promise for waterbirds and 'wildlife-friendly' farming initiatives, but most work has focused on conspicuous, well-known species and the value of flooding harvested fields to provide non-breeding habitat. The Australa...
Article
Many species have adapted successfully to traditionally cultivated agricultural environments but, as production systems are intensified, this adaptation is reaching its limits. Conflicting facets of sustainability compound the problem. Here we describe how reductions in the use of water in rice fields is compromising the persistence of the largest...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife‐friendly produce shows promise in addressing the disconnect between consumers' choices and the loss of biodiversity from agriculture. However, the scope of programs and their contribution to conservation remain limited. An improved understanding of specific markets, combined with auspicious scenarios, could address this. In Australia's Mur...
Article
Effective incentive programs for farmers to conserve biodiversity on their properties are vital for sustainability. Most such programs have focussed on natural areas, like revegetating waterways, but novel agricultural habitats amplify the commitment required of farmers and the need for collaboration in the conservation process. The rice fields of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A summary of technology being used to study the endangered Australasian Bittern in Australia and New Zealand.
Article
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We document widespread use of rice fields by the globally endangered Australian Painted Snipe (Rostratula australis), highlighting the potential for ‘wildlife-friendly’ food production in Australia. A total of 44 Australian Painted Snipe from five of 93 surveyed rice field study sites, and an additional 43 Australian Painted Snipe from three other...
Article
In response to our paper testing whether mistletoe represents a keystone resource [[1][1]], Thomsen & Wernberg (TW) [[2][2]] integrated our experiment with previous work and introduced a novel hypothesis to explain how structural complexity influences community composition. While we share their
Article
The family Pygopodidae (flap-footed lizards) in Australia contains 41 species in seven genera (Aprasia, Delma, Pygopus, Lialis, Ophidiocephalus, Paradelma and Pletholax; Wilson & Swan, 2010). The genus Aprasia contains twelve slender, worm-like species, all of which have restricted geographical ranges and a tendency to burrow beneath rocks, logs an...
Article
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Various entities have been designated keystone resources, but few tests have been attempted and we are unaware of any experimental manipulations of purported keystone resources. Mistletoes (Loranthaceae) provide structural and nutritional resources within canopies, and their pervasive influence on diversity led to their designation as keystone reso...
Article
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Abstract Most of the original forest and woodland cover on the western slopes of New South Wales and the northern plains of Victoria has been cleared for agriculture (wheat, sheep and cattle) and what remains is highly fragmented and modified by a long history of disturbance. Over the past three decades, native eucalypt trees and shrubs have been p...
Article
Mistletoe is a prominent component of woodlands throughout south-eastern Australia. Unlike many woodland plants and animals that are becoming increasingly scarce, mistletoe has responded positively to habitat fragmentation and has become more abundant in many areas. These parasitic plants are widely regarded as introduced pests that kill trees and...
Article
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The Australian Painted Snipe Rostratula (benghalensis) australis is a striking wader of inland wetlands. Records from the Atlas of Australian Birds indicate that it has suffered a great decline since the 1950’s, particularly in its apparent former stronghold in the Murray-Darling Basin. The Australian Painted Snipe project was initiated by the Thre...
Article
Full-text available
The nationally threatened Pink-tailed Worm-lizard Aprasia parapulchella was first discovered on Nail Can Hill Flora Reserve in Albury during August 2002 (8 individuals) and subsequently, during September (1 individual) and October 2003 (58 individuals), representing one of the largest known populations in NSW. Animals were found sequestered beneath...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Empower rice farmers to conserve endangered Australasian Bitterns.