Matthew Greer

Matthew Greer
Syracuse University | SU · Department of Anthropology

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4
Publications
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Citations

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
This article presents the results of a combined neutron activation analysis (NAA) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis of 243 locally made ceramic vessels from the northern Shenandoah Valley region of Virginia (USA). The goal of this study was to determine if the geochemical composition of lead glazes...
Article
Late-18th- to mid-19th-century British refined earthenwares are found the world over, yet these have rarely been analyzed using archaeometric techniques, and almost everything we know about differentiating and dating these ceramics comes from written documents. Through a preliminary LA-ICP-MS and SEM-EDS analysis of 25 refined earthenware glazes (f...
Article
Historical archaeologists working in the Middle Atlantic rarely use archaeometric techniques to source ceramics. Yet, there are several important research questions we can ask if we sourced more of our ceramics. This article presents the findings from a neutron activation analysis study that sourced 100 presumably locally-made vessels recovered fro...
Article
Full-text available
In the early nineteenth century, members of one household of the enslaved community at Virginia's Montpelier plantation buried their dog near the duplex they called home. This action, on its own, unfortunately does not speak directly to the broader experiences of Africans or their descendants forced into American bondage, or the specific experience...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
This is an ongoing archaeological project aimed at learning about the lives of enslaved Africans at Belle Grove Plantation in Frederick County, Virginia (USA). From 2015-2019 fieldwork focused primarily on excavating Belle Grove's main enslaved quartering site. In 2020 we shifted our focus to studying the broader plantation landscape and reanalyzing artifacts recovered from earlier excavations. Researchers associated with the project have focused primarily on analyzing faunal, ethnobotanical, and ceramic artifacts and using remote sensing techniques to locate landscape features. A variety of other artifacts and environmental samples are available for future studies.