Matthew William Fraser

Matthew William Fraser
University of Western Australia | UWA · Oceans Institute

PhD (Marine Science)

About

39
Publications
11,377
Reads
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841
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2016 - present
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Researcher
March 2012 - March 2016
University of Western Australia
Position
  • PhD Student
February 2011 - present
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Tutor/Lecturer
Description
  • Lectured and ran tutorials in: •Marine Systems •Field Techniques in Marine Science •Ecological Processes •Completed UWA's Postgraduate Teaching Internship in 2013. •Co-supervision of Masters and Honours students.

Publications

Publications (39)
Article
Full-text available
Seagrasses are globally recognized as bioindicators of marine eutrophication and contamination. Seagrasses also harbor a distinct root microbial community that largely reflects the conditions of the surrounding environment as well as the condition of the seagrass. Hence monitoring changes in the root microbial community could act as an additional b...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Nature-based methods use the creation or restoration of coastal habitats for hazard risk reduction. This can be done through restoring the habitat alone (“soft” approach), or in combination with hard structures that support habitat establishment (“hybrid” approaches). The need to develop, test and apply more sustainable techniques to mitigate the i...
Article
Full-text available
Cable bacteria are sulfide-oxidizing, filamentous bacteria which reduce toxic sulfide levels, suppress methane emissions, and drive nutrient and carbon cycling in sediments. Recently, cable bacteria have been found associated with roots of aquatic plants and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the extent to which cable bacteria are associated with aquati...
Article
Full-text available
Seagrass condition, resilience and ecosystem services are affected by the below-ground tissues (BGr) but these are rarely monitored. In this study we compiled historical data across northern Australia to investigate biomass allocation strategies in 13 tropical seagrass species. There was sufficient data to undertake statistical analysis for five sp...
Article
Seagrasses and lucinid bivalves inhabit highly reduced sediments with elevated sulphide concentrations. Lucinids house symbiotic bacteria (Ca. Thiodiazotropha) capable of oxidising sediment sulphide, and their presence in sediments has been proposed to promote seagrass growth by decreasing otherwise phytotoxic sulphide levels. However, vast and pro...
Article
Full-text available
Seagrasses are important marine ecosystems situated throughout the world’s coastlines. They are facing declines around the world due to global and local threats such as rising ocean temperatures, coastal development and pollution from sewage outfalls and agriculture. Efforts have been made to reduce seagrass loss through reducing local and regional...
Preprint
Full-text available
Seagrasses and lucinid bivalves inhabit highly reduced sediments with elevated sulphide concentrations. Lucinids house symbiotic bacteria (Ca. Thiodiazotropha) capable of oxidising sediment sulphide, and their presence in sediments has been proposed to promote seagrass growth by decreasing otherwise phytotoxic sulphide levels. However, vast and pro...
Article
The increased occurrence of extreme climate events, such as marine heatwaves (MHWs), has resulted in substantial ecological impacts worldwide. To date metrics of thermal stress within marine systems have focussed on coral communities, and less is known about measuring stress relevant to other primary producers, such as seagrasses. An extreme MHW oc...
Article
The development of early warning indicators that identify ecosystem stress is a priority for improving ecosystem management. As microbial communities respond rapidly to environmental disturbance, monitoring their composition could prove one such early indicator of environmental stress. We combined 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the seagrass root micro...
Article
Full-text available
A central question in contemporary ecology is how climate change will alter ecosystem structure and function across scales of space and time. Climate change has been shown to alter ecological patterns from individuals to ecosystems, often with negative implications for ecosystem functions and services. Furthermore, as climate change fuels more freq...
Article
Full-text available
The role of environmental-stress gradients in driving trophic processes like grazing, has potential to shape ecosystem responses to environmental change. In subtidal seagrass systems, however, the variation in top-down processes along stress gradients are poorly understood. We deployed herbivory assays using the five most common seagrass species of...
Data
Comprehensive list of fish species found in the Eastern embayment of Shark Bay, Western Australia. Table has been adapted from Travers and Potter (2002), Jackson et al. (2007), Belicka et al. (2012), Heithaus et al. (2012) and Walker et al. (2012). (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Sediment microorganisms can have profound influence on productivity and functioning of marine ecosystems through their critical roles in regulating biogeochemical processes. However, the identity of sediment microorganisms that mediate organic matter turnover and nutrient cycling in seagrass sediments is only poorly understood. Here, we used metage...
Data
Rarefaction plot of taxonomic profiles generated from seagrass sediments across Shark Bay.
Data
Changes in relative abundance of functional genes (annotated with SEED Subsystems database, level 2) between seagrass sediments in high salinity sites (>46‰, sites 7 and 9, white) and low salinity sites (<46‰, gray). Only putative functions that were significantly different between higher and lower salinity sites are shown, with corrected P-values...
Data
Changes in relative abundance of putative functions related to amino acids (annotated with SEED Subsystems database, level 3) between seagrass sediments (green) and microbial communities from other ecosystems (gray, Supplementary Table S4). Only putative functions that were significantly different are shown, with corrected P-values calculated using...
Data
Summary of metagenomic sequencing results for Shark Bay sediments. Number of base pairs, sequencing reads, annotated proteins and % predicted using the SEED subsystem database after quality control on the MG-RAST pipeline.
Data
Summary of metagenomes used to compare microbial communities in seagrass rhizosphere sediments to other ecosystems. All metagenomes are publicly available on the MG-RAST server.
Data
DistLM results (Stepwise selection, sequential tests using corrected Akaike’s Information Criteria as selection criteria) of taxonomic community data (class level) against nine potential predictor variables (9999 premutations).
Data
Summary of physical and biogeochemical data at each site. Depth, temperature, and salinity all averages over 5 CTD casts. Sediment organic matter, enzyme expressions, microbial P biomass, and seagrass P content are averages (n = 3 per site). DIP = dissolved inorganic phosphorus, BD = below detection.
Data
DistLM results (marginal tests) of taxonomic community data (class level) against nine potential predictor variables (9999 premutations).
Article
The presence of oxygen in seagrass tissues, which plays a role in preventing seagrass die-off, is partly regulated by environmental conditions. Here, we examined the relationship between oxygen (O2) in the rhizomes of Posidonia sinuosa and key environmental variables at Garden Island, Western Australia. We made in situ measurements of internal oxyg...
Article
Full-text available
Continued seagrass declines in ecosystems with improved water quality may be driven by sediment stressors. One of the most cited examples of a seagrass ecosystem with declines is Cockburn Sound, Western Australia, where 75% of seagrasses (2169 ha) were lost in the 1960s-1980s due to poor water quality. Water quality has subsequently improved in Coc...
Article
Full-text available
Dredging can have significant impacts on benthic marine organisms through mechanisms such as sedimentation and reduction in light availability as a result of increased suspension of sediments. Phototrophic marine organisms and those with limited mobility are particularly at risk from the effects of dredging. The potential impacts of dredging on ben...
Article
Full-text available
The transfer of organic material from one coastal environment to another can increase production in recipient habitats in a process known as spatial subsidy. Microorganisms drive the generation, transformation, and uptake of organic material in shallow coastal environments, but their significance in connecting coastal habitats through spatial subsi...
Article
Full-text available
Aims Seedling establishment is a crucial life history stage in seagrasses, yet factors that affect seedling health are poorly characterized. We investigated if organic matter (OM) additions to sediments provided nutritional benefits for seagrass seedlings through microbial degradation. Methods We tested the effects of sedimentary OM additions on P...
Article
Full-text available
In a recent paper by Thomson et al. (2014), vivipary is implied for the eastern Australian Zostera, Zostera nigricaulis (revised from Zostera tasmanica; Kuo 2005). However, the definition of vivipary (production of genetically distinct offspring resulting from sexual reproduction) needs to be fully explored in terms of the experimental claims by th...
Article
We investigated the phenology and spatial patterns in Halophila decipiens by assessing biomass, reproduction and seed density in ~400 grab samples collected across nine sites (8 to 14m water depth) between June 2011 and December 2012. Phenology correlated with light climate which is governed by the summer monsoon (wet period). During the wet period...
Article
Full-text available
Photosynthesis of most seagrass species seems to be limited by present concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Therefore, the ongoing increase in atmospheric CO2 could enhance seagrass photosynthesis and internal O2 supply, and potentially change species competition through differential responses to increasing CO2 availability among spe...
Article
Extreme climatic events can trigger abrupt and often lasting change in ecosystems via the reduction or elimination of foundation (i.e., habitat-forming) species. However, while the frequency/intensity of extreme events is predicted to increase under climate change, the impact of these events on many foundation species and the ecosystems they sup-po...
Article
Full-text available
Extreme climatic events will dictate the response of ecosystems to climate change, yet are understudied in marine ecosystems. The interaction of stressors from such events has the potential to amplify negative impacts and drive ecosystems into alternate states.Here, we show a drastic response of a temperate seagrass species (Amphibolis antarctica)...
Conference Paper
Marine ecosystems where habitat-forming species exist near their thermal tolerance limits are prone to temperature-related perturbations that cause dramatic shifts in community structure and function. In a global biodiversity hotspot in Western Australia, at the transition between temperate and tropical zones, we documented the rapid decline of the...
Article
Differences in phosphorus (P) availability can influence the ecology and physiology of seagrass communities; and are usually inferred from changes in the relative P content in seagrass leaves. Shark Bay is a subtropical marine embayment, with decreasing P concentrations in the water column and sediments from north to south across the entire embayme...
Article
Full-text available
This special issue on ‘Science for the management of subtropical embayments: examples from Shark Bay and Florida Bay’ is a valuable compilation of individual research outcomes from Florida Bay and Shark Bay from the past decade and addresses gaps in our scientific knowledge base in Shark Bay especially. Yet the compilation also demonstrates excelle...
Article
Full-text available
Sulfides in sediments and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) intrusion in plant tissues were investigated for six species of seagrass in Shark Bay, Western Australia, at two sites with elevated salinities of 42 and 45 psu. H2S intrusion ranged from <20% to 100% in roots and rhizomes, indicating a high degree of sulfide intrusion in some cases, although this di...
Article
Full-text available
The process of predation causes significant mortality in coral reef fishes immediately following settlement. However, much of what we know of predator identity is based on a small number of detailed studies. This study aims to identify the key predator of early juvenile coral reef fishes on Ningaloo Reef, North-Western Australia. Video cameras were...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Archived project
Project
Most plant trait-based research has targeted terrestrial plants, while an effect-response trait framework for marine vegetated ecosystems, particularly globally threatened but important seagrass meadows, is lacking. The aim of this project is to investigate the interplay between seagrass response and effect traits and their effects on the stability of seagrass meadows (i.e. ability to maintain primary production) during synergistic light reduction and elevated temperatures. In addition, the project addresses generalizability of the importance of seagrass effect traits for primary production at a global scale by comparing two temperate regions with high seagrass diversity: Australia and Finland.