Matthew Cooper

Matthew Cooper
ETH Zurich | ETH Zürich · Department of Earth Sciences

PhD
Studing legacy of effects of land-use on forest restoration through soil analysis, carbon capture data & remote sensing

About

4
Publications
1,216
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12
Citations
Introduction
I am a PhD candidate working as a systems scientist addressing linkages between anthropogenic soil disturbances and tropical forest recovery mechanisms. My studies will utilise state-​of-the-art remote sensing techniques to bridge the gap between plot scale and landscape scale analyses of tropical forest carbon and vegetation dynamics. My specific focus lies in East Africa where I lived and worked for more than ten years in different ecological restoration projects (Kyaninga Forest Foundation).
Education
October 2016 - June 2019
Freie Universität Berlin
Field of study
  • Biodiversity, Evolution and Ecology

Publications

Publications (4)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The net primary productivity (NPP) of tropical forests is an important component of the global terrestrial carbon (C) cycle. The lack of field-based data, however, limits our mechanistic understanding of the drivers of NPP and C allocation. In consequence, the role of local edaphic factors for forest growth and C dynamics is unclear and introduces...
Article
Full-text available
The African Tropics are hotspots of modern-day land-use change and are, at the same time, of great relevance for the cycling of carbon (C) and nutrients between plants, soils and the atmosphere. However, the consequences of land conversion on biogeochemical cycles are still largely unknown as they are not studied in a landscape context that defines...
Preprint
Full-text available
The African Tropics are hotspots of modern-day land-use change and are, at the same time, of great relevance for the cycling of carbon (C) and nutrients between plants, soils and the atmosphere. However, the consequences of land conversion on biogeochemical cycles are still largely unknown as they are not studied in a landscape context that defines...
Data
Version 1.0 of the TropSOC database. Accompanying publication in ESSD currently under review, but available as a pre-print at: https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2021-73

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