Matthew Brett

Matthew Brett
Deakin University

About

21
Publications
2,020
Reads
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232
Citations
Citations since 2016
15 Research Items
221 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
In Australia, the Disability Discrimination Act and associated Educational Standards prevent educational institutions from treating people with disability less favourably than those without disability – directly or indirectly. However, people with disability are still subject to both economic and cultural disadvantage in Australian higher education...
Thesis
This dissertation defines the heredity of Australian higher education. Consistent with higher education and public policy literature, this heredity is embedded in an integrated higher education and public policy cycle, bridged by legislation. Financing legislation between 1850 and 2020 was examined demonstrating that legislatures have accommodated...
Article
Pitman, T., Brett, M., and Ellis, K. Three decades of misrecognition: defining people with disability in Australian higher education policy. Disability and Society. (accepted)
Technical Report
Harvey, A., Cakitaki, B., & Brett, M. (2018). Principles for equity in higher education performance funding. Report for the National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education Research. Melbourne: Centre for Higher Education Equity and Diversity Research, La Trobe University.
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report investigates the social demography, learning outcomes and educational experiences of students enrolled in two distinct modes of higher education delivery in Australia – university programs delivered through third party arrangements, and higher education courses delivered by non-university higher education institutions (NUHEIs). In short...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Australia’s future depends on all its people, whoever and wherever they are, being enabled to successfully engage in beneficial lifelong learning.
Chapter
This chapter positions the increase in the provision of pathway programs, including foundation and enabling programs, as a function of global trends shaping higher education and localised responses to social, economic, political and cultural factors. These localised responses play out against a broader global context, in which the increasing mobili...
Chapter
This chapter explores the use of enabling programs by Australian universities to improve participation and success for students historically underrepresented in the nation’s higher education system. It draws on empirical evidence from a national research project designed to undertake a review of current enabling programs offered by Australian highe...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Fellowship research sought to better understand how accountability for performance against equity policy goals and funding operates across the Australian higher education system. This entailed consideration of: how equity goals are defined; who defines equity goals; how equity goals are resourced; how performance against equity goals is monitor...
Chapter
Full-text available
Enabling programs are not-for-degree programs designed to provide the necessary academic and cultural scaffolding for students who do not meet the institution’s usual admissions criteria. The evidence from the study indicates that Indigenous enabling pathways provide an important and effective environment in which the students develop a sense of be...
Chapter
In 1990, the Australian Government published A Fair Chance for All, the first national framework for student equity in higher education. A Fair Chance for All declared that all Australians should have the opportunity to participate successfully in higher education, and that this objective could be met by ‘changing the balance of the student populat...
Chapter
People with a disability comprise one of the largest growing and most complex groups within higher education. A Fair Chance for All noted that people with disabilities tend to be treated as a homogeneous group, but that assistance needs to be carefully targeted to individuals. Access has risen since the Framework was introduced, and universities ha...
Book
This book examines twenty-five years of the Australian framework for student equity in higher education, A Fair Chance for All. Divided into two sections, the book reflects on the legacy of equity policy in higher education, the effectiveness of current approaches, and the likely challenges facing future policymakers. The first section explores the...
Chapter
This chapter explores the role of knowledge within Australian higher education policy with specific emphasis on student equity. The Australian higher education system is designed to pursue teaching-, research-, and equity-related objectives. Teaching- and research-related objectives are broadly and successfully fulfilled through policy and funding,...
Article
Full-text available
There has been a significant and consistent increase in the numbers and proportion of students disclosing disability at enrollment in Australian higher education. The growth in student numbers has paralleled the introduction and enhancement of legislative and policy instruments that enable their participation. Whilst significant changes are evident...
Conference Paper
An ecological understanding of disability is emerging in international and research contexts. The disability policy framework operating in the Australian higher education sector is grounded in medical and social models of disability. The World Health Organisation International Classification of Functioning (ICF) can be considered an ecological mode...
Conference Paper
Students with disabilities are one of the success stories of government equity policy over the previous decade. Access, participation, retention and success indicators have seen major improvements since data was first collected in the mid-nineties. This group however, is relatively absent from the first year experience and transition literatures. E...
Article
Full-text available
The call centre industry is a relatively new phenomenon within Australia. The sector has undergone a period of rapid growth and is estimated to be worth $2.5b with an annual growth rate of 25%. Previously in Australia only large companies such as airlines, telecommunications and banks established call centres. Advancements in telecommunications tec...
Article
Full-text available
The University of Melbourne has over a number of years developed a network of faculty contacts to assist in implementing supports for students with disabilities. The role of the Disability Contact Officer has evolved over time from being an additional administrative duty during examinations to a set of responsibilities now established in faculty st...

Network

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Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
This project will review the interaction of student equity with existing performance and accountability systems, and generate an Equity Performance and Accountability Framework. The Framework will facilitate the integration of student equity within new or revised performance and accountability mechanisms at a system and institutional level. The Framework will be stress tested by application within higher education policy reform processes and institutional settings.
Archived project
Funded as part of the Australian Government Department of Education and Training National Priorities Pool funding 2014 round, this project aimed to examine: i. the extent to which current enabling courses offered by Australian higher education providers are an effective means of increasing access to, participation and success in undergraduate courses for domestic students from disadvantaged groups; ii. the appropriateness of enabling courses as a pathway to university for disadvantaged groups compared to other pathways; iii. the variability in quality between enabling courses that impacts on their effectiveness for disadvantaged student groups; and iv. what, if any, particular practices or means of delivery should be incorporated into enabling courses to enhance their effectiveness for people from disadvantaged groups.