Matt A White

Matt A White
University of New England (Australia) | UNE · Palaeoscience Research Centre

Doctor of Philosophy

About

103
Publications
17,894
Reads
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439
Citations
Introduction
Bachelor Degree in Earth Science (Hons). This research focused on geological mapping and sedimentology of Pleistocene megafauna deposits Nelson Bay Victoria, Australia. Masters Degree focused on describing the evolution of the theropod metatarsus with focus on the subarctometatarsus. PhD research focused on the revised skeletal description, range of motion and biological restoration of Australovenator wintonensis. The biological restoration and ROM was used in continuing footprint analysis.
Additional affiliations
December 2010 - April 2017
The University of Newcastle, Australia
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Completing PhD studies on Australia's most complete theropod dinosaur Australovenator wintonensis from the Winton Formation, central Queensland Australia.
January 2003 - January 2007
Deakin University
Position
  • Master's Student
Description
  • Completed Masters work on feathered dinosaurs from China investigating the unusual pedal structure referred to as the sub-arctometatarsus.
Education
January 1999 - December 2002
Deakin University
Field of study
  • Earth Science

Publications

Publications (103)
Article
Full-text available
Distinguishing the difference between theropod and ornithopod footprints has proved a difficult task due to their similarities. Herein our aim was to produce a method where a skeleton could be more closely matched to actual fossilised footprints. The reconstructed pes of the Australian Megaraptoran Australovenator wintonensis was utilised for this...
Article
Full-text available
The pedal range of motion in Australovenator wintonensis is investigated to determine what influence soft tissue had on range of motion in the foot. Fortunately, the theropod pes shares a close morphology with extant large cursorial birds. Therefore, to better understand the pedal range of motion of Australovenator, the pedal range of motion of Dro...
Article
Full-text available
The hypertrophied manual claws and modified manus of megaraptoran theropods represent an unusual morphological adaptation among carnivorous dinosaurs. The skeleton of Australovenator wintonensis from the Cenomanian of Australia is among the most complete of any megaraptorid. It presents the opportunity to examine the range of motion of its forearm...
Article
Full-text available
Megaraptorid theropods were an enigmatic group of medium-sized predatory dinosaurs, infamous for the hypertrophied claw on the first manual digit. Megaraptorid dentition is largely restricted to isolated teeth found in association with skeletal parts; however, the in situ maxillary dentition of Megaraptor was recently described. A newly discovered...
Article
Full-text available
We report new skeletal elements pertaining to the same individual which represents the holotype of Australovenator wintonensis, from the 'Matilda Site' in the Winton Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of western Queensland. The discovery of these new elements means that the hind limb of Australovenator is now the most completely understood hind limb amon...
Article
Full-text available
Ferrodraco lentoni, an anhanguerid from the Upper Cretaceous Winton Formation of northeast Australia, is the most complete Australian pterosaur described to date, represented by a partial cranium, incomplete cervical series and wing elements. Herein we present a comprehensive osteological description of Ferrodraco, as well as an emended diagnosis f...
Article
Full-text available
A second specimen of the Australian cimolodontan multituberculate Corriebaatar marywaltersae from the same loca�lity (Flat Rocks) as the holotype and previously only known specimen, reveals far more anatomical information about the species. The new specimen, composed of most of a dentary containing a complete p4 and alveoli for the lower incisor...
Article
Full-text available
The Wapiti Formation of northwest Alberta and northeast British Columbia, Canada, preserves an Upper Cretaceous terrestrial vertebrate fauna that is latitudinally situated between those documented further north in Alaska and those from southern Alberta and the contiguous U.S.A. Therefore, the Wapiti Formation is important for identifying broad patt...
Article
Full-text available
Crocodylians are among Earth’s most successful hyper-carnivores, with their crocodyliform ancestors persisting since the Triassic. The diets of extinct crocodyliforms are typically inferred from distinctive bite-marks on fossil bone, which indicate that some species fed on contemporaneous dinosaurs. Nevertheless, the most direct dietary evidence (i...
Article
Full-text available
The Upper Cretaceous 'upper' Winton Formation of Queensland, Australia is world famous for hosting Dinosaur Stampede National Monument at Lark Quarry Conservation Park, a somewhat controversial tracksite that preserves thousands of tridactyl dinosaur tracks attributed to ornithopods and theropods. Herein, we describe the Snake Creek Tracksite, a ne...
Article
Fossil tracks should theoretically capture differences in pedal anatomy between growth stages of the same taxon, particularly those related to the soft tissue of the foot, providing a more realistic view of pedal ontogeny than skeletal material alone. However, recognizing these ontogenetic trajectories is complicated by the influence of preservatio...
Article
Full-text available
Classifying isolated vertebrate bones to a high level of taxonomic precision can be difficult. Many of Australia’s Cretaceous terrestrial vertebrate fossil-bearing deposits, for example, produce large numbers of isolated bones and very few associated or articulated skeletons. Identifying these often fragmentary remains beyond high-level taxonomic r...
Article
Late Cretaceous tracks attributable to deinonychosaurs in North America are rare, with only one occurrence of Menglongipus from Alaska and two possible, but indeterminate, occurrences reported from Mexico. Here we describe the first probable deinonychosaur tracks from Canada: a possible trackway and one isolated track on a single horizon from the U...
Article
Two enigmatic, poorly preserved specimens of mammalian upper molars have been recovered from the Eric the Red West locality in Victoria, Australia. They are two of the three known specimens of mammalian upper molars from the Mesozoic of Australia. The two are quite different from one another. One is likely to be a tribosphenic mammal, the other may...
Article
Full-text available
The holotype specimen of the megaraptorid Australovenator wintonensis, from the Upper Cretaceous Winton Formation (Rolling Downs Group, Eromanga Basin) of central Queensland, is the most complete non-avian theropod found in Australia to date. In fact, the holotype of A. wintonensis and isolated megaraptorid teeth (possibly referable to Australovena...
Article
Megaraptorid theropods thrived in South America and Australia during the mid-Cretaceous. Their Australian record is currently limited to the upper Barremian–lower Aptian upper Strzelecki Group and the upper Aptian–lower Albian Eumeralla Formation of Victoria, the Cenomanian Griman Creek Formation of New South Wales, and the Cenomanian–lowermost Tur...
Article
Full-text available
Digital dissection is a relatively new technique that has enabled scientists to gain a better understanding of vertebrate anatomy. It can be used to rapidly disseminate detailed, three-dimensional information in an easily accessible manner that reduces the need for destructive , traditional dissections. Here we present the results of a digital diss...
Data
Pedal phalanx II-3 Left pedal phalanx II-3 in: (A, B) Lateral; (C, D) Cranial; (E, F) Medial; (G, H) Ventral; (I, J) Proximal.
Data
Pedal phalanx III-1 Right pedal phalanx III-1 in: [b](A, B) Cranial; (C, D) Ventral; (E, F) Medial; (G, H) Lateral; (I, J) Proximal; (K, L) Distal. Left pedal phalanx in: (M, N) Cranial; (O, P) Ventral; (Q, R) Medial; (S, T) Lateral; (U, V) Proximal; (W, X) distal.
Data
Pedal phalanx III-3 Left pedal phalanx III-3 in: (A, B) Dorsal; (C, D) Medial; (E, F) Ventral; (G, H) Lateral; (I, J) Proximal; (K, L) Distal. Right pedal phalanx III-3 in: (M) Caudal; (N) Ventral; (O) Medial; (P) Lateral; (Q) Proximal; (R) Distal (R).
Data
Pedal phalanx IV-4 Left pedal phalanx IV-4 in: (A, B) Cranial; (C, D) Ventral; (E, F) Medial; (G, H) Lateral; (I, J) Proximal; (K, L) Distal.
Data
Pedal phalanx I-1 measurements * Best estimate due to poor preservation. Measurements in mm.
Data
Pedal phalanx I-2 Left pedal phalanx I-2 in: (A, B) Caudal; (C, D) Ventral; (E, F) Medial; (G, H) Lateral; (I, J) Proximal. Right pedal phalanx I-2 in: (K) Caudal; (L) Ventral; (M) Medial; (N) Lateral (O) Proximal.
Data
Pedal phalanx II-1 Left pedal phalanx II-1 in: (A, B) Cranial; (C, D) Ventral; (E, F) Ventral; (G, H) Medial; (I, J) Proximal; (K, L) Distal.
Data
Pedal phalanx III-2 Left pedal phalanx III-2 in: (A, B) Caudal; (C, D) Ventral; (E, F) Medial; (G, H) Lateral; (I, J) Proximal; (K, L) Distal.
Data
Pedal phalanx III-4 Left pedal phalanx III-4 in: (A, B) Cranial; (C, D) Ventral; (E, F) Medial; (G, H) Lateral; (I, J) Proximal.
Data
Pedal phalanx IV-1 Left pedal phalanx IV-1 in: (A, B) Cranial; (C, D) Ventral; (E, F) Medial (G, H) Lateral; (I, J) Proximal; (K, L) Distal.
Data
Pedal phalanx IV-2 Left pedal phalanx IV-2 in: (A, B) Cranial; (C, D) Ventral; (E, F) Medial; (G, H) Lateral; (I, J) Proximal; (K, L) Distal.
Data
Pedal phalanx IV-5 Right pedal phalanx IV-5 in: (A, B) Cranial; (C, D) Ventral; (E, F) Medial (G, H) Lateral; (I, J) Proximal.
Data
Pedal phalanx I-1 Right pedal phalanx in: (A, B) Cranial; (C, D) Ventral; (E, F) Medial; (G, H) Lateral; (I, J) proximal; (K, L) distal.
Data
Pedal phalanx II-2 Left pedal phalanx II-2 in: (A, B) Cranial; (C, D) Ventral; (E, F) Medial (G, H) Lateral; (I, J) Proximal; (K, L) Distal.
Data
Pedal phalanx IV-3 Left pedal phalanx IV-3 in: (A, B) Cranial; (C, D) Ventral; (E, F) Medial; (G, H) Lateral; (I, J) Proximal; (K, L).
Data
Left dentary of Australovenator wintonensis AODF 604 The holotype left dentary of Australovenator wintonensis: (A, B) Dorsal; (C, D) Lingual; (E, G) Labial. Abbreviations: Mg, Meckelian groove; sym, symphysis. Scale bar = 10 cm.
Data
Left dentary of Australovenator wintonensis
Data
Full and reduced data sets. Full (i.e., all 20 taxa) and reduced taxadatasets
Data
Right dentary of Australovenator wintonensis The holotype AODF 604 right dentary of Australovenator wintonensis.
Data
Full-text available
Metatarsal IV (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Pedal phalanax I-2 (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Metatarsal I (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Metatarsal III (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Pedal phalanx III-4 (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Pedal phalanx IV-1 (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Pedal phalanx IV-2 (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Pedal phalanx IV-5 (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Pedal phalanx III-2 (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Pedal phalanx III-3 (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Pedal phalanx IV-3 (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Pedal phalanx II-2 (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Reconstructed metatarsus and pes. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Various comparisons of left metacarpal I of the Australovenator wintonensis holotype have been made with Rapator ornitholestoides. These specimenswere identified as being morphologically more similar than either was to that of the neovenatorid Megaraptor namunhuaiquii. Owing to thepoor preservation of A. wintonensis and R. ornitholestoides, distinc...
Article
Full-text available
New skeletal elements are reported of the holotype specimen Australovenator wintonensis, from the type locality, near Winton, central western Queensland. New elements include left and right humeri, right radius, right radiale, right distal carpal 1, near complete right metacarpal I, left manual phalanx II-1, left manual phalanx II-2, near complete...
Data
Radiale measurements. (DOC)
Data
Distal carpal 1 measurements. (DOC)
Data
Metacarpal 1 measurements. (DOC)
Data
Manual phalanx I-1 measurements. (DOC)
Data
Manual phalanx I-2 measurements. (DOC)
Data
Metacarpal II measurements. (DOC)