Matt Lodder

Matt Lodder
University of Essex · School of Philosophy and Art History

Doctor of Philosophy

About

21
Publications
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Introduction
My research primarily concerns the application of art-historical methods to history of Western tattooing from the 17th century to the present day, with a principal focus on the professional era from the 1880s onwards. My expertise also extends to wider histories of body modification practices in the West. I have recently published work on feminist debates in pornography, and on the intersections of consent, culture and the law in queer subcultures in the 1970s, '80s and '90s.

Publications

Publications (21)
Chapter
Tattooing in the West has long been of great interest to scholars from a range of academic disciplines, including anthropology, criminology, and psychology, as well as to philosophers and theorists. In this chapter, I argue that these approaches are almost all flawed in various ways, as they develop their accounts on the back of historical sources...
Article
This article focuses on the work of enigmatic female gonzo director Mason, and examines her filmic negotiations of genre convention within the American pornographic industry. Close analyses of her films reveal a rich, textured set of filmic strategies which complicate conceptions of what mainstream gonzo pornography looks like and how it functions....
Chapter
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http://www.oxforddnb.com/public/dnb/100996.html Macdonald, Sutherland (1860–1942), tattoo artist, was born at Boundary Terrace, Leeds, Yorkshire, on 25 June 1860, the eldest child in the family of at least three sons and two daughters of Robert Macdonald (1821/2–1898), a private and later sergeant in the Royal Engineers, and his wife, Elizabeth né...
Chapter
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http://www.oxforddnb.com/public/dnb/100995.html Burchett, George (1872–1953), tattoo artist, was born George Burchett Davis at 9 Toronto Terrace, Brighton, Sussex, on 23 August 1872, the eldest son in the family of twelve children of George Burchett Davis (1849/50–1923), a journeyman french polisher who became a picture frame maker and later a sho...
Chapter
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A letter from influential San Francisco-based tattoo artist Ed Hardy to a homonymous counterpart in London, Lal Hardy, dated 5th March 1990, reads: I would like to get together and visit next time I’m in England. I’m very keen on the old time stuff as you know, and a few of the current artists. I do think the new old style is what will be happenin...
Chapter
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Nostalgia, the melancholy fondness for the past which seems to characterize much material and cultural revival, was once thought to be pathological—a literal disease, or psychiatric disorder. Swiss soldiers fighting as mercenaries abroad in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries were frequently afflicted with bouts of weeping, anorexia...
Book
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Revivalism in art, design and architecture is a foundational aspect of modernism, though it has often been overlooked. This volume seeks to investigate the diverse dimensions of revivalism, exploring its meanings and impacts across cultures and media between c.1850 and 1950. Bringing together case studies that highlight revivalism in fields as dive...
Article
The National Maritime Museum in Greenwich owns a 1941 portrait bust by Charles Thomas Wheeler of Captain George Elvey Creasy, the Director of Anti-Submarine Warfare and later Admiral of the Fleet. On the nape of his neck, carved into the bronze, is the depiction of a tattoo: a merman fighting a dragon covered in Nazi swastikas. From an account of t...
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This book review of Jon Reiter's 'George Burchett - King of Tattooists' discusses the revelation that Burchett's famous 'Memoirs of a Tattooist' was actually a posthumous confection of journalism and half-truth, and presents a newly enriched account of Burchett's life, work and legacy.
Article
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The interconnections between the worlds of tattooing and fine art have deep roots. One of the most popular performing tattooed ladies in London during the Victorian era was Emma de Burgh, one half of an American husband and- wife attraction, which toured the circuses and cabarets of Europe throughout the 1890s. Emma’s back was famously adorned with...
Chapter
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It is a simple truth that tattooing largely reflects the visual culture from which it emerges, at least in the West. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, European pilgrims to the Holy Lands were tattooed with the devotional iconographies of their faith (crosses, Christograms, images of Christ). At the turn of the nineteenth century, tradesme...
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The origins of Western tattooing: exploding a popular myth Anyone delving into the history books will read that tattooing was “discovered” or “rediscovered” by Captain James Cook on his voyages to Tahiti, New Zealand and the Pacific region in the 1770s – the practice having long since died out and faded from memory in Europe and America. This fact...
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In 1980 or thereabouts, Lal Hardy – a name now well-known to everyone involved in tattooing, but then just a brighteyed young punk in his early twenties – was strolling up North London’s Finchley Road towards Dennis Cockell’s shop, Exclusive Tattoo. Passing an Italian restaurant, he noticed a man sitting at a table by the window eating lunch with h...
Article
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One of the aspects of tattoo history that interests me is the way that tattoos have been viewed not just as designs on bodies, but as discrete art objects in their own right. Although it might seem extraordinary, there is a fascinating 20th century history of the collecting, purchasing and displaying of tattoos as if they were objets d’art like any...
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RE/Search Publications’ Modern Primitives (Vale and Juno 1989) changed countless lives, bringing what had been a localized and niche set of body modification practices, aesthetics and philosophies out of San Francisco to a global audience, dominating scholarly and popular discourse around body modification subculture for more than a decade afterwar...
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If you’ve ever seen an episode of Miami Ink, or its spinoff TV shows LA Ink and London Ink, you’ll doubtless be familiar with the accepted format for bringing tattoos to the TV screen: a monotonous series of identikit teary-eyed mothers and sombre pet-owners gravely expostulating (at some length) about the serious and sincerenarrative meanings behi...
Thesis
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This thesis is an investigation into the legitimacy and limits of the term “body art” in its vernacular sense, wherein it refers to methods of decorating or ornamenting the body, such as tattooing or piercing. Though the term is widely used and widely understood, it has rarely appeared in any writing which takes an explicitly arthistorical or art‐c...
Chapter
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Encyclopedia entries: "Branding", "Ear Cropping", "Subdermal Implants", "Subincision of the Penis", "Suspension", "Teeth Filing", "Tongue Splitting"

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