Matt Faw

Matt Faw

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3
Publications
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Citations
Introduction
Episodic Memory Model of Subjective Experience (EMMOSE): What we know as Subjective Experience is actually the first experiencing of a brand new episodic memory, still vivid and full of detail. The hippocampus is at the hub of all perceptual systems, and binds them into a coherent scene. The hippocampus also allows the perception of mind, as core network simulations utilize the hippocampal loop. 'Self' is just part of perception, rather than an agent that perceives.

Publications

Publications (3)
Article
Full-text available
Reply to: Behrendt R-P. Hippocampus as a wormhole: gateway to consciousness. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, e1446. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1446.
Article
Full-text available
We propose that the phenomenon known to neurologically intact people as 'Subjective Experience' is best understood as the activation of various sites in both extrinsic and intrinsic networks by a brand new episodic memory engram (i.e., a complex theta wave coding pattern originating from field CA1 of the hippocampus). Like a media news outlet, the...
Presentation
Full-text available
5 minute explainer video for EMMOSE, the Episodic Memory Model of Subjective Experience.

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
We have a published anatomical model of subjective experience, but when we introduce it to others, their question is inevitably: "but how does it answer the Hard Problem?"
After a few years of this, I'm not sure anyone actually agrees on what the Hard Problem really is, or what it would mean to "answer" it. Wikipedia mentions over 20 versions of the Hard Problem, many barely related to each other. I've even asked David Chalmers this directly, but he avoided giving a specific response.
So, Researchgate fellows, help me zero in on this question. What would it mean for an anatomical theory of subjective experience to "answer the Hard Problem of Consciousness"?
Question
Dear RG community,
We have published an anatomical model to explain the basis and purpose of subjective experience. https://bit.ly/2Vg7G4H  When we show it to others, however, their first question is always: "well, how does it answer the Hard Problem of consciousness?"
 
What would it mean for an anatomical model to 'answer the Hard Problem'? Can the Hard Problem even be answered by science, or is it only for philosophy?  Do we need to explain more than how experience works, and why the brain does it?

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