Matt Barnes

Matt Barnes
Shining Horizons Land Management / Northern Rockies Conservation Cooperative

M.S., Range Science
Reintegrating Wildness: an integral approach to rangeland stewardship and coexistence with large carnivores

About

34
Publications
16,854
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
682
Citations
Citations since 2017
7 Research Items
495 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
Introduction
I'm an integralist, applied ecologist, and conservationist, working on rangelands, primarily the working landscapes of the American West. I focus on synthesis, resolving debate about grazing management, and advancing coexistence with large carnivores that are potential predators of livestock. My ultimate interests are at the confluence of ecology, the human adventure, and consciousness.
Additional affiliations
October 2017 - July 2022
Northern Rockies Conservation Cooperative
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Reintegrating Wildness: an integral approach to rangeland stewardship and coexistence with large carnivores
January 2013 - December 2017
People and Carnivores
Position
  • Field and Research Coordinator
Description
  • Rangeland stewardship; coexistence with grizzly bears and gray wolves
April 2010 - present
Shining Horizons Land Management
Position
  • Owner and rangeland consultant
Description
  • Whole-systems resilience from the Great American Desert to the Land of Shining Mountains
Education
June 2000 - December 2002
Utah State University
Field of study
  • Range Science
August 1996 - May 2000
The University of Arizona
Field of study
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Science, Wildlife Ecology, Range Management

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
In this project, we—a rancher and a conservationist—applied low-stress approaches to herding and night-penning cattle at relativelyhigh stocking density (SD) within a rangeland pasture in a larger grazing rotation. We increased herd instinct, and we used SD to increase animal impact in a target area, with benefits for rangeland forage production. W...
Article
Full-text available
Livestock–large carnivore coexistence practitioners can be more effective by expanding from a direct focus on carnivores and predation-­prevention tools to the broader social-­ecological context of ranches and rural communities, especially livestock management. Ranchers can apply many of the same approaches that work for rangeland health and livest...
Article
Full-text available
The article focuses on the strategic grazing management for complex creative systems. Rangelands are complex systems because the dynamic relationships between their parts result in self-organization, emergent properties, and unpredictable behavior. The discrepancy has been noted by scientists who suggest that our profession must do a better job of...
Article
Full-text available
On the Ground Grazing capacity increased substantially and rangeland vegetation measurements improved after the Howell Ranch applied strategically planned and managed grazing. Increased capacity was realized from more spatially uniform grazing distribution and harvest efficiency rather than improving conditions over time. Dividing a ranch into padd...
Article
Full-text available
Matthew K. Barnes examines the case studies, experiences, and observations of the symposium presenters, including ranchers producing grassfed beef or genetics primarily on western rangelands, dairy-farming veterinarians, the AGA and the Southwest Grassfed Livestock Alliance in the American West. Richard Parry, a fourth-generation sheep rancher, sta...
Article
Full-text available
On the Ground •The inaugural Range Practicum incorporated practical, hands-on training and demonstrations into the SRM Annual Meeting and Training, contributing to its "new look" in 2020. The Range Practicum translated stockmanship, packing, horse training, and prescribed fire, as well as agency rangeland monitoring and soils training, into practi...
Article
Full-text available
Adopting a systems view and regenerative philosophy can indicate how to regenerate ecosystem function on commercial-scale agro-ecological landscapes. Adaptive multi-paddock grazing management is an example of an approach for grazinglands. Leading conservation farmers have achieved superior results in ecosystem improvement, productivity, soil carbon...
Article
Full-text available
In this article we argue that stockmanship is an integral—albeit over-looked and underappreciated— part of range management. Low stress herding has been used to improve grazing distribution on large rangeland landscapes with continuous, season-long, or other relatively extensive grazing management. However, it may be that its most powerful applicat...
Article
Full-text available
Range riders can improve grazing management for rangeland health, livestock production, and coexistence with wildlife, potentially including large carnivores, by applying strategic grazing management. In this project, practical conservationists partnered with progressive ranchers in western Montana to develop herding methods for strategic grazing m...
Article
On the Ground Landscapes are complex creative systems that are endlessly emerging, transforming, and vanishing as a result of ever-changing relationships among organisms and environments—soil, plants, herbivores, and human beings. In the process, all organisms are actively participating in creating environments; they aren't merely adapting to them....
Article
Full-text available
On the Ground By managing for more even animal distribution, ranch managers can increase the amount of forage accessible to livestock and raise their effective grazing capacity. Smaller paddocks and higher stocking density improve the distribution of grazing in each paddock. A landscape of many, smaller paddocks will spread grazing pressure more ev...
Article
Full-text available
Rangelands P lant community change is inevitable, and grazing management strongly affects how change occurs. Heavy or frequent defoliation reduces individual plant vigor and productivity. 1 Animal preferences for particular pasture locations and plant species reduce the benefits of moderate average stocking rates in continuously grazed paddocks wit...
Article
Full-text available
Rangelands P lant community change is inevitable, and grazing management strongly affects how change occurs. Heavy or frequent defoliation reduces individual plant vigor and productivity. 1 Animal preferences for particular pasture locations and plant species reduce the benefits of moderate average stocking rates in continuously grazed paddocks wit...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Grazing ecosystems are what scientists call complex adaptive systems: the whole is greater than the sum of the parts because of the relationships between the parts. The relationships form the web of life, so intricate that their individual and collective behaviors exhibit patterns that are beyond complicated: self-organization with emergent propert...
Article
Full-text available
Generations on the Land: A Conservation Legacy. By Joe Nick Patoski. 2011. Sand County Foundation/Texas A&M University Press, College Station, TX, USA. 136 p. US$25. hardcover. ISBN 978-1-60344-241-1.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Increased stocking density increases instantaneous grazing pressure, but does not necessarily reduce diet quality and nutrient intake. Animals’ ability to select quality over time and space is driven by stocking rate for that period of time, and can be changed through management. We modeled a hypothetical grazing cell as divided into increasing num...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Rotational stocking may reduce repeat grazing of preferred plants relative to more extensive grazing methods such as continuous stocking, thus increasing effective grazing capacity. We measured repeat defoliation and documented a shift in feeding choice over short grazing periods in small paddocks.At Cedar Mountain, Utah, during July-August, we sto...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Rotational stocking may reduce the selectivity of grazing animals relative to more extensive grazing methods such as continuous stocking, thus increasing grazing capacity. We tested the hypotheses that, as stocking density increased under intensive rotational stocking, grazing use would be distributed over a higher proportion of species, and the ti...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Greater and Gunnison sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus and C. minimus) forage in wet meadows adjacent to sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) rangelands. Both sage-grouse species are thought to require a higher proportion of forbs and associated insects in their diets than is usually available in either anthropogenic grass meadows or some sagebrush rang...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Pasture subdivision can increase control of the time and place grazing occurs, often resulting in more even distribution of utilization across a landscape over a grazing cycle, but more concentrated distribution within a grazing period. However, the assumption that paddock subdivision and increased stock density necessarily reduce selectivity, nutr...
Article
Full-text available
The claim that intensive rotational grazing (IRG) can sustain higher stocking rates can be partially explained by more even spatial distribution of grazing such that livestock consume forage from a greater proportion of a pasture. To test the hypothesis that utilization is more even at the higher stocking densities of smaller paddocks, mean absolut...
Chapter
Full-text available
The benefits of multi-paddock rotational grazing on commercial livestock enterpriseshave been evident for many years in many countries. Despite these observations and theresults of numerous studies of planned grazing deferment before the mid-1980s that showbenefit to species composition, most recent rangelands grazing studies suggest thatrotational...
Article
Full-text available
The New Ranch Handbook: A Guide to Restoring Western Rangelands. By Nathan F. Sayre. Edited by Barbara H. Johnson. 2001. The Quivira Coalition, 551 Cordova Road, #423, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501, USA. 102 + x p. US$10.00 (+3.00 S&H) paper. ISBN 0-9708264-0-0.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Resolution to the decades-long debate about multiple-paddock rotational grazing including Holistic planned grazing (both sides are right, but partial): creativity and adaptation in the context of real-world complexity. Symposium (2012) and a sponsored issue of Rangelands (2013).
Project
Application of rangeland stewardship, especially strategic grazing management and stockmanship, to reducing livestock predation risk, and thus to large carnivore conservation. Synthesis across rangeland management, livestock husbandry, wildlife management, predator-prey interactions, and behavioral ecology.
Project
Low-stress herding to apply strategic grazing management on a finer scale than feasible with only cross-fencing and rotational grazing. Increasing herd instinct, improving grazing distribution, and reducing vulnerability to predation.